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Restless after work today, so I poked at the anvil a bit, careful to avoid grinders. Had an amiable co-worker with a sledge take a closer look at a crack that opened up on the underside of the horn... looks like a(nother) failed forge weld to me! Top picture shows coarse crystals where my weld broke apart; I'm inclined to think not enough preheat combined with the nature of the impurities present in the material. Thoughts?

Also, thank you all for your thoughts, kind wishes, and anvil-leaning.

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On 2/1/2018 at 6:00 PM, Exo313 said:

Excessive useless quote removed

I made an anvil only a 55 pounder for my welding shop class project.  Made it out of a piece of Railroad track.  Yes anvils grinding+grinding= more grinding, and more grinding.  Of course Im not going to be making another one since I sold it.  I'm out right buying my new one.

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I picked up a spool of Stoody 965-g 2 years ago for topping what will be my 250# homemade anvil. I will be using stoody buildup at around 3/8" thick under it first and then top with 3/8"-1/2" of the 965.  I tested the 965 by tig welding 3/16" thick topping over a 2" wide 1" thick flat bar stood on edge and then beating it relentlessly in a safe protected manner with a hard hammer. It didn't chip or deform. I use this little block to cold form stuff sometimes and it doesn't mark it at all. I can tell you that it is file hard and doesn't chip or deform. It is very similar to A2 in composition but at half the carbon content so it is very tough. Since you can tig a bead of it on things and it air hardens it is kinda handy to have some lengths straightened out just for little repairs where you want a hard spot for some reason or a hard tip on a tool. I am hoping to get my anvil setup this spring and since I haven't done this yet or proven it over time I can't actually recommend it yet but since I do stop here and read stuff from time to time I caught this and thought I would add to it. I have on hand also stoody 19 stick rods and stoody 101hc I think and those work good for abrasive things like excavators or in my case used on post hole digging attachments but absolutely no good for an anvil as they check or crack and will be very unsafe.  Since the 965 is so hard though I would recommend some actual "buildup"  layer under it that is designed for it. The stoody buildup wire I have air cools to the upper 20's rockwell C where as the 7018 will probably be in the teens somewhere. I believe also the 965 is recommended to not be over 1/2" thick since it gets too stressed in the continual layers. Hope this helps.

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I can see why, now, that people do not recommend 7018 on anvils. That stuff deforms like playdough when you hit it. I have three, 5 pound blocks of solid 7018 weld metal that I made in the run up to certification for L.A. City, Building and Safety. Those were just practice beads. But for a structure, elasticity is a good thing.

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No it looks granular rather than fibrous; of course remember due to recycling by busheling it's possible to have a piece with both types visible on the end. (I had a rod like that which I would carry around as an example as it showed both types side by side...)

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  • 3 weeks later...

Well, update that isn't much of an update:

My life got kind of crazy. Father in law ended up in the hospital (But is doing better now). Then my wife lost her job. Then I got the flu-turned-bronchitis and missed a bunch of work. When I had been there I didn't feel like sticking around later to continue the rebuild. 

If I'm feeling good tonight I might try tacking 'er up and start on welding the horn back on. We'll see.

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  • 1 month later...

No pictures yet, but layer 1 of 2 using Stoody 965 APG is complete

 I'm seeing a significant increase in rebound after 1 layer, but I'm thinking a second layer thick will get it right where I want it. Two is the max for this wire anyway. 

Anyone have thoughts on hardfacing the horn and step? I don't necessarily see a downside, apart from the extra work. 

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