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A list of 100 valuable hacks


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Hmmm. Some very useful ideas there ... and a few pretty dodgy ones too! I never knew you could cut PVC pipe with a piece of string. Now I'll have to try that and see if it works.

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Aus,

I thought the PVC pipe idea a little odd. But I had recently seen it somewhere else. iirc that source mentioned that the cutting was done by friction.

I suspect that it would require a fair amount of string.

Let me know how it works out.

Happy Australia Day to you and everyone else Down Under.

Regards,

SLAG.

from 'Up Above".

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Slag, I had to try that doubtful trick about cutting PVC pipe with a piece of string. Surprisingly, I could see how it works. I used a length of builders line (or several actually) to cut through a 40mm pipe. I also found a quicker method: an old steel cable from a motorcycle clutch. The friction created actually melts the pipe rather than cuts. And you don't want to touch the wire during the process.

Cheers and thanks for the Australia Day wishes.  It was a work day for me as we always have a lot of visitors to the forge on this day.

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Cutting PVC with a string is darned easy when you have the right string and don't need a perfectly straight end.  Works like a charm and is a lot faster on sewer pipe than a hand saw in the field.  I compared to an actual saw specifically designed for large PVC pipe and a string---string was generally more than twice as fast.  The only thing to watch out for is hesitating:  Since you are melting the cut on the PVC, if you stop for a second it will solidify and grab the string.

It's a necessity in some cases to be able to use a string---I recently had a problem with some PVC conduit that had the wire already through it but needed to be cut.  A saw would have possibly damaged the wire and it would have been impossible to push the wire end back down the conduit to clear the saw.  Additionally, there was a conduit clamp holding the piece to a metal post just 2 inches below the cut area so no back clearance.  I ran a string around the backside, did the yanking, and cut the offending expansion joint off without any wire damage or having to remove the clamp.  Zip zip, back in business with a new expansion joint and weather-proof box welded on the end.

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Kozzy,

Great information.

Are certain kinds of string better than others?

I suspect that almost any string would work in the field.

I love this site. There are so many knowlegeable people here with a vast stock of information and all manner of experience.

SLAG.

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1 hour ago, SLAG said:

Are certain kinds of string better than others?

SLAG.

Every time I've tried it, I simply grabbed what I had hand for string. I did have one that had problems and tended to break but others I tried all worked fine.  I have no clue what the actual materials were...other than it even worked with a cotton string.  I have some kevlar stunt kite string (spectra) that I should toss in the back of the tool box as an actual "tool" for this.  That stuff is known to friction cut remarkably well.

Long strokes so the string itself cools off a bit while out of the cut....basically nearly full arm and not just little wiggles.

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