Sanderson Iron

Enamel Coating

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The old glass porcelain enamels?  May be out of the country.  Back in the 1980's I worked on the line at Whirlpool and they had *1* line that still did a real porcelain enamel coating on refrigerators for hospitals and labs. As I recall it was one of their first lines to be sent to Mexico due to labor/health/safety laws in the USA.  I'll try searching when I'm in Mexico Monday (and so automatically get the Mexican searches)

Now for quite small items; many art departments at colleges and universities may offer an enameling class---a friend of mine teaches one as part of their jewelry making classes.

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Greetings Joel, 

        You might try several coats of powder paint to get the desired look. Depending on the. Element and it’s nooks and crannies it might just work for you.  Just a thought. 

Forge on and make beautiful things 

Jim

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On 1/13/2018 at 9:51 AM, ThomasPowers said:

The old glass porcelain enamels? 

Yes, the glass enamel coating is what I mean.  Thank you, Thomas.  I guess I can mail parts to Mexico just as easily as anywhere else, though there is the ethical/nationalistic/patriotic idea of keeping it in the States. 

On 1/13/2018 at 10:08 AM, Jim Coke said:

        You might try several coats of powder paint to get the desired look. Depending on the Element and it’s nooks and crannies it might just work for you.  Just a thought. 

Thank you, Jim.  I don't know why, but there 's something about paint that I just can't quite accept.  I can't put my finger on it.  Why would a glass coating be better?  I haven't defined it for myself.   I've heard it said that you can't even tell the difference between porcelain/enamel and a good powder coat.   

I just got some parts back from a place in Illinois, and they're just terrible--actively flaking off as it sat on the table, sending shards of glass to the beyond.   Maybe it's not a good idea at all, I don't know; but I'd like to try another place before I give up on the idea.  

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what metal are you wanting to be enameled?  Choosing the right enamel to match the metal's properties makes a difference too.  I once was trying to follow Theophilus' instructions for enamelling and I had a lot of trouble with spalling too until finally I succeeded using the glass from a '40's? truck brake lense I had dug out of the spoil banks along the river...

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16 hours ago, ThomasPowers said:

what metal are you wanting to be enameled?  Choosing the right enamel to match the metal's properties makes a difference too. 

It's 1018 in 16 and 11 gauge.  (At least I was told it's 1018.)  This guy coated it first in the wrong color, then in the color I wanted on top of the first color after I corrected him, and anywhere it has two coats, it's popping off.  Some other sample parts with a single first coat, and the back of the parts I need, are not popping.  I'm annoyed that he messed it up so badly.  Maybe I should give him another chance, but he took two and half months to do what he did, wrong, so how long to get it right?  I've got a show this piece is supposed to be in the end of this month.  I guess I'll make new parts and leave them iron for it.  But I want to find the answer for other pieces. I think it has potential, though maybe Jim is right and I should try powder coating.  Hmmmm....

 

 

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Greetings Joel,

       I still think more than one coat of powder coating will give a quality look . I think it would be much stronger and retain its finish with a little flex factor..  My friend about 2 miles from me has a complete professional powder coat system so we can try some samples when you come up in the spring if you wish.

Forge on and make beautiful things 

Jim

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Sounds like a good idea, Jim.  I bet it would be more flexible, wouldn't it?  I'll make new parts for this piece, but since the show is coming right up, I'll probably have to leave this table with plain steel for now.  Thank you very much for the offer to take me over to your friend's place.  If I saw the process I'd understand it better and probably accept it more.  

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Powder coating uses static charges to hold plastic or epoxy particles on the part. It is then cured in an oven to melt the powder. No need for multiple coats as the process works better with thicker coats unless you want it to orange peal.

It’s the plastic version of enameling. The only common solvent that will touch it is acetone, it can be burned off or sand blasted if nesisary. 

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Much of this has to do with the size, shape, and small nooks and crannies of your project.

Larger parts that have been sent out to be professionally powder coated to better withstand the elements look good when they come back. Problem was that any bump or abrasion would compromise the powder coating and moisture would get under the coating and start the base metal to rust. This would start small and then get progressively larger.There was NO WAY to repair the damage short of removing the powder coating (sand blasting), starting over, and applying a new finish. I have seen this same issue on store bought items either in the store (new) or after they have been in use for a while. Look at some of the lawn furniture etc.that is being thrown away.

Paint may not be to your liking appearance wise, but you expect it to last the lifetime of a car. And it can be repaired if the finish is scratched or damaged. 

 

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Plated parts can also be powder coated as well. This is common in automotive and motorcycle parts. This helps mediate the problem of corrosion under the coating. For an art piece it certainly can be made to look like a thick enamel coating

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