Jclonts82

notching cutting edge insert

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I have seen some examples of forge welding the cutting edge (HC) into lower carbon, WI, or pattern welded body. Many times I have seen (the cursed youtube) the inserted edge notched every 1/2 - 1" or so with a chisel before being inserted for the weld. Why is this? Are we introducing more surface area to weld? allowing flex room for the insert to bend better to match the body? 

I'm wanting to eventually give making some axes a go, and am researching beforehand. 

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I don't know specifically what you referring to; but traditionally you nick an insert to lock it in place so it doesn't have as great a tendency to "squirt out" when you go to weld it.  But as I said not knowing which videos you are referring to I can tell if that is the case for your question.

Can you tell me if the origami lightening bolts are a necessary part of sword forging like I saw on a video on youtube?

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Quick search for examples yielded this.  The  typed description on this video mirrors what TP described above. "Teeth are cut into a high carbon bit which will anchor it into the soft iron axe body for forge welding."

ironically searching for this example is the first time I found an explanation/reason for the notches. Unfortunately the majority of my 'research time' is limited to while at work, and the comp has no sound so I can't follow commentary, I can only watch or read.

I'm simply curious if there are other reasons for doing it. 

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I've also wondered if this is necessary.  Theoretically, if the forge weld was done properly there should be no need for this step.  Plus, it might introduce open pockets inside the steel. 

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i do that when welding edges in. If I don't then there is A) a very good chance that it will slip out whilst heating and turning in the forge and B ) when the weld is struck the first time everything is slippery and the HC piece flies out!  It all saves a lot of juggling and hoping things don't slip out of alignment before he weld is made

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I can see that, I just wonder about creating a void?

For my purposes, I think I would just tack weld the top and bottom. MAYBE one tack in the middle to keep things from moving too much, while still allowing enough movement for the blows to push together any imperfect surfaces and fill spaces on the two welding surfaces. 

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from my experience those tac welds look bad when its finished so I disagree,  I strongly suggest one learns to wire it and do it that way

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Wouldn't you be able to grind through them easily while profiling? That could also depend on the depth of penetration on the weld.

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