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Super Strength Concrete post anvil base?


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Hello, recently I have come across a 900 mm long 4.5" solid round of already heat treated 4140 for a very good price and brought it home but I have no idea how I'm actually going to use it as a anvil. I was thinking of building a wooden pyramid like structure about 750 mm tall, 500 wide and 250 wide at top with the pyramid top cut off placing the anvil inside and filling it with super strength fastcrete (30 MPA fast setting concrete). 

Would this be any good? If I stand it upright the 900 mm is right at my knuckle height also any additional idea as to getting it upright? Preferably without buying a engine hoist?

 

Thank you in advance.

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I have no experience with use of concrete in anvil bases. Take a look at this thread for some ideas. I made an anvil similar to what you're describing with a metal support with the anvil attached to it with clamps. The all contraption is stationary and bolted to the floor. 

 

 

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I think a wooden structure alone would work, and make for a move-able stand. I have heard of cement sleeve post anvils for LONG  stock before but have never seen one personally. I wouldn't like  the idea of having to bust the thing up if i ever wanted to rebuild tho. If you are going to go cement perhaps a 55 gal. barrel would be a better "shell" than wood. That would allow you to move it as well. 

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I made my anvil with an 8lb sledge hammer head and nine lengths of 4x4 lumber. Cut the wood to the same length, strap them together, carve out a tight hole for the anvil, and beat in the anvil.

The only problem I have found so far is that in bounces around a bit when I start really getting down on it. Check out my thread about my shop for pics.

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The consensus on concrete anvil bases generally seems to be NO, not a good idea. The vibration of the hammer blows can cause cracking and chipping, leading to instability at best and catastrophic failure at worst. 

You'd be much better off making your pyramidal wood shell, standing the anvil vertically inside, and filling up the space with sharp sand (the kind made for construction from crushed rock, not the stuff that you pick up from a riverbed or beach). That will hold the anvil solidly, and you can also adjust the height by increasing or decreasing the amount of sand under the bottom end of your anvil. It also has the advantage of being relatively easy to disassemble and move.

That said, 900 mm (~35") of 4-1/2" round heat-treated 4140 should make you a very good anvil. Good find, and good luck! Make sure you post pictures on the improvised anvils thread linked above!

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4.5" diameter 35" long is about 158 pounds of good steel and only really needs a wooden stand to steady it in a vertical orientation.   Wooden "Tail Fins"  held on with large hose clamps would probably work if I was using it.   

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i've got a big old pile of offcuts from doing a project that are all about 8" square. If it were me i'd buy a 4.5" hole saw and just slam centered holes through them, then slide them down over the anvil for a nice snug fit, screwing together every few layers with the screws offset every other. if it was too tippy some tail fins like TP said. but thats mostly because my wife has been yelling at me to burn off that pile for a year of so :lol:

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6 minutes ago, JHCC said:

Sure, but then what do you do with the circular cutouts?

make frisbees on my lathe for my other hobby, disc golf! and by that i mean finally have an excuse to buy the lathe i want. 

there's actually a market for mini metal or wood lathe spun frisbees, as silly as that sounds. because in competition disc golf a miniature frisbee is used to mark your place so you dont step on nice frisbees and so you get an extra 8-12" closer to the hole (the "mini" is placed in front of the edge closest to the hole). cheap plastic ones are given away free all the time, but people like the look of a good wood spun one. when i say market though, i mean 5-10$ max for what amounts to more than that in hourly work by a long shot. not a money making endeavor haha. 

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4 hours ago, Charcold said:

i've got a big old pile of offcuts from doing a project that are all about 8" square. If it were me i'd buy a 4.5" hole saw and just slam centered holes through them, then slide them down over the anvil for a nice snug fit, screwing together every few layers with the screws offset every other. if it was too tippy some tail fins like TP said. but thats mostly because my wife has been yelling at me to burn off that pile for a year of so :lol:

I like this idea best seems relatively simple... Only wood I can get is something like treated pine however would that work?

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Start with a square hole that's 4.5" to 5 " and build out.  I didn't have enough scrap the right length so I glued everything together and then set the post and put sand in to solid up and quiet the post/anvil and fill the voids.  It's solid and very quiet.  

 

JHCC 

kinda startled me with that pic.  Still my main anvil.

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