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Seax Question

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What most folk think of as a "suit of armor" is often 16th century jousting armor.  That said, when someone with money went to an armorer to get a set of armor there were usually parts that could be added or removed.  For example, the helmet that would actually be worn in combat had a fairly open face because limited vision in a battle is not a good thing and for better ventilation.  For jousting, a visor with much more limited vision and heavier plates would be added.  A small vision slit works if all you have to see is your oncoming opponent.  the same is true of the rest of the armor, various plates would be added for the joust.

The same set of armor configured for the joust could be much heavier than it would be for actual military service.

Because it was thought very cool to have pieces of armor fly off at impact some pieces of armor were spring loaded so that if the opponent hit the target just right pieces would fly high into the air.

I have seen a person wearing a full set of historically correct plate armor turn a cartwheel.  Hardly so limiting to need a crane to mount a horse. 

 

"By hammer and hand all arts do stand."

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I don't like Hollywood movies about Vikings: too much seax and violence.

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9 hours ago, George N. M. said:

I have seen a person wearing a full set of historically correct plate armor turn a cartwheel. 

 

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There is a story of William the Marshall (13th century) dancing with the ladies in full armor while waiting for a tournament to start.  He may have said, "You'll have to pardon my dancing, I'm a bit rusty."

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Mr. G. N. M. ,

Stated that William the Marshall danced in full armor.

SLAG  says,

SIGH !

Gone are the good old days.

Perhaps in my next carnation.

SLAG.

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3 hours ago, George N. M. said:

There is a story of William the Marshall (13th century) dancing with the ladies in full armor

That's interesting -- what was he wearing?

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Now everyone at work is looking at me! 

(I think William the Marshal could wear anything he wanted to. I know I would not have been eager to face him on the tourney or battle field(s)!)

And of course the Ladies in Armour brings up Elanor of Aquitaine when she accompanied Louis on crusade as well as Joan of Arc.

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