Steve Heseltine

Can anyone help with any info on my newly purchased anvil please?

Recommended Posts

I'm in the final tuning stages of my gas forge. I had the tank and acquired an old treadmill from the trash to make the stand.  I think I have $100 in the forge or somewhere around there.  On my next one, I'll make the front mouse hole big enough so I can reach my whole arm all the way in for application of the various coatings.   I think it will do what I want.  some progress is found in my "another newbie" in gas forges.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 minute ago, MotoMike said:

I had the tank and acquired an old treadmill from the trash to make the stand.

Be very careful: the last thing you want is for your forge to run away from you.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
6 minutes ago, JHCC said:

Be very careful: the last thing you want is for your forge to run away from you.

I was trying to figure out a way to incorporate the tread so I could give my legs a workout at the same time, but ultimately opted for making it stationary. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

See, if you were going with solid fuel, you could use that workout to power your blower.

By the way, if you still have the motor and controls, a number of folks here have used treadmill motors to power grinders, metal-cutting bandsaws, and the like. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

A firebrick forge would likely be the cheapest/most flexible option to get up and running quickly. 

The light white bricks for the sides/roof and a hard split firebrick for the floor. 

Few bits of angle iron welded together for the top of it to hold the burner and you can change the forge shape/size depending on what you're doing. 

There's a company called vitcas which sell grade 26 bricks (Resistant to 1430oC (2600oF).)  for £2.40 each. Think it's about 15 for mainland delivery, and they have a load of other stuff like castle refractory, kiln wash, etc. 

Failing that, pottery suppliers usually carry similar products if you have one local 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 12/6/2017 at 4:36 AM, JHCC said:

No, but I fake it well!

Mostly just knowing where to look.

Oh BABY that's my philosophy! It's more important to know where to find the knowledge you seek than know it. This is one reason we recommend you spend some time reading the section(s) of Iforge related to the subject you're interested in. After a little reading you should have a  good enough handle on whatever it is to ask good questions, understand the answers and look up specifics.

If you'll do some reading in "Forges 101" and "Burners 101" you'll find a number of discussions Re. finding refractories in countries other than the USA, English sources are mentioned a few times. Whatever you do, DO NOT make your own refractory liner. Plaster of Paris and ANYTHING are not only bad refractories they can be outright dangerous and Portland Cement concrete is worse! Home brew refractories CAN be made but it's a major hassle when the good stuff is available, even shipping is cheaper than home made. 

Try searching for the material not brand name and NEVER search for the application. For example, "ceramic blanket refractory" and "water set high alumina castable refractory." The second search term is how I found Kast-O-Lite 30 and it's available locally. Well within 55 miles, call it 90 km. The company has a number of high alumina castables but a little time on the phone made my second purchase the golden product. They also service furnaces, "HVAC" so have scrap Kaowool by the dumpster, building codes say they MUST use new material off the roll so any trimmings get thrown out. I haven't purchased Kaowool in 30 years and have a 50 gl. lawn trash bag full in the shop.

The telephone is a much better device for finding things like this than internet searches. The net will give you phone numbers after which you talk to the receptionist who knows more about the business than the owner. If the company you call doesn't carry what you need most times they know who does and will happily give you the number.

Talking to PEOPLE is far more useful than sifting through what marketing software wants to sell you. "Here are some items you might be interested in!"

Once you get started keep us in the loop, curmudgeons are actually helpful folk. 

Frosty The Lucky.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Steve,

A couple of things.........As others have said, consider not starting with bladesmithing.  The skills needed to make nice blades are learned by making small things first like hooks.  You learn to taper and draw out metal and scroll, etc.  All these little things teach you valuable skills that I'm told help later in making blades.  You won't regret easing into it and you won't have to learn simple things later on such as scrolling  a knife guard.  Imagine spending a few years perfecting blade making and then struggling to make the scrolled guard on a Bowie knife that a customer ordered. 

The other thing is that I think starting out with a gas forge is a good idea.  I did, and I spend way more time forging than having to learn to move metal AND maintain a good coal fire.  I think I'll likely build a coal forge someday for my shop and learn it because it has some super great advantages, but right now I enjoy working two projects at once without worrying the one in the forge is going to burn up on me.  I personally wouldn't try building one as a first project.  They aren't hard to do as you will read on this forum, but again, why not buy one where the bugs have been worked out of the design and you can just hook it up to start forging.  You will have better success.  Your anvil and your forge are the two biggest investments you'll make.  Notice I said investments.  By purchasing a good anvil and forge (gas) you put yourself in a much better position than the guy teetering away on a piece of track with a cobbled up one burner forge.  Sure, if that's all you can do it's better than not forging, but if you have the means to buy good equipment to start do it.  It may take longer to start and get where you want to be, but you'll be glad you took the time to acquire tongs, hammers, a good anvil, and a good working forge.  

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now