Jump to content
I Forge Iron

New Member


Recommended Posts

Hello!

I'm new to the forum, just joined 15 minutes ago lol...

I am new to Blacksmithing but love everything I have done so far. I have completed a couple classes at the heritage museum closed to me and at the local college.

Also did a 3 day bladesmithing class in Camp Verde, AZ a few weeks ago with ABS Mater Ray Rybar.

Currently working on acquiring my own tools and getting shop space set up.

Right now this will be a hobby or side job? But I have plans to move to Hawaii in about three years.

My wife and I purchased land there earlier this year on the Big Island, 20 Acres. So we will be working on building a house and a shop in the next couple years before moving.

I will add some pictures of the tools I have gotten so far.

 

2x72.jpg2 x 72 grinder from Ameribrade

anvil.jpg 200lb anvil from Pieh tools and the stand I built myself

forge.jpgMy vintage forge I bought about 45-50 years old in the process of restoring it now

post vise.jpg

a post vise I got

surface grinder.JPG

and old Boyar-Schultz surface grinder

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Welcome aboard, (not sure what to call you) glad to have you.

You've got quite the kit already, the forge is kind of iffy though, in my opinion. It's going to cost a bunch to ship to Hawaii and I THINK you're gong to have to ship coal too. Darned expensive beginning to end. Charcoal has been used in forges and furnaces for millenia longer than coal and from what I hear coconut shell is an excellent source. Check out the "side blast" forge as they're better suited to charcoal AND they work a treat for coal. Check out the JABOD forge for one that you won't have to ship  from the mainland. ;) The 55 forge is another example of using what's available to make a good working forge, it's also easy to set up as a side blast.

Don't get too carried away buying tools till you have some time and experience, most of us have lots of dust collectors we bought thinking they would be THE thing and it turned out. Not for us. A couple basic smooth faced hammers but don't get heavy ones yet, I find 2lb. is a good weight. Heavy enough to do serious work but not so heavy they tire you too quickly, injure joints or make your mistakes permanent too quickly.

When you're beginning you may not realize you're getting tired, some of the cues are kind of subtle. When you're tired it's easier to make mistakes which extends the learning curve and worse it makes correcting mistakes harder. Learning to correct the inevitable mistakes is an important skills set. Worse you forget proper techniques and can do damage to your joints without realizing it. Believe me a 2lb. hammer will move metal and do less damage. The guys swinging big honkin hammers are often doing it just because. Sure there a lot of guys who do it safely but they have the experience AND muscle conditioning. Proper conditioning isn't just about being strong, it's the right muscles in the right condition that's important, then you have to use them the way they're designed.

Frosty The Lucky.

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

19 hours ago, Frosty said:

Welcome aboard, (not sure what to call you) glad to have you.

Frosty The Lucky.

 

Hello,

My name is Jason, The forge is gas not coal.

When I do ship to Hawaii I will most likely be buying a shipping container, not using UPS or anything like that.

I will have everything including cars and Motorcycle to ship in addition to more equipment that I buy between now and then.

I'm sure it's going to cost a pretty penny but it's a one time thing lol...

Thanks for the Welcome!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

38 minutes ago, DaHawaiianViking said:

The forge is gas not coal

Some of those older gas forges are quite robustly built, but as a consequence can be extremely inefficient.  Depending on your eventual goals for forging, this forge may not be worth restoring and shipping.  It doesn't look like any of the older commercial forges that I'm familiar with, and may have been a home built, or limited production model.  Hard to tell the scale from the photo, but his looks like a monster, suited to a production shop or school.

Looks like you have some very impressive kit otherwise.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

That type of forge is a REAL GAS HOG; I assume gas is expensive over there like everything else?  So buying/making a more efficient forge for doing things like blades would probably pay for it self in almost no time at all.  Also is that forge set up for propane or natural gas and if natural gas do you have access to that in Hawaii?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

4 minutes ago, Latticino said:

Some of those older gas forges are quite robustly built, but as a consequence can be extremely inefficient.  Depending on your eventual goals for forging, this forge may not be worth restoring and shipping.  It doesn't look like any of the older commercial forges that I'm familiar with, and may have been a home built, or limited production model.  Hard to tell the scale from the photo, but his looks like a monster, suited to a production shop or school.

Looks like you have some very impressive kit otherwise.

the forge is about 33" square on the top surface.

it is mostly working space though. The actual fire box area or "inner" forge area is 8"x9"x12"

I like the flexibility of it because the top fire bricks can be arranged for a larger or smaller oven space.

It was a manufactured forge, made by Wheeler Forge in Westminster, CA. This was the workhorse forge for many shops in the 60s and 70s with most still in use today.

as far as weight and shipping to Hawaii I'm not to concerned as it will be a shipping container.

11 minutes ago, ThomasPowers said:

That type of forge is a REAL GAS HOG; I assume gas is expensive over there like everything else?  So buying/making a more efficient forge for doing things like blades would probably pay for it self in almost no time at all.  Also is that forge set up for propane or natural gas and if natural gas do you have access to that in Hawaii?

I was told it could run on propane or natural gas, costs over there are comparable, maybe even cheaper than where I am now lol...

I'm sure I will have multiple forges in the future, different sizes for different size jobs.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

If it's jetted you will need to resize the jets/orifices for the fuel used if it is not the same; it may be easier to do while you are still here.  I remember gasoline selling for 32 cents a gallon  for years in the 1960's.  It's still a gas hog with very different fuel prices.  If your move is still several years in the future---fire it up and see how much it costs to run!  I budget about US$2 an hour for my forge and can run off a BBQ grill bottle. (of course efficiency will go up with my next re-line...)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

×
×
  • Create New...