Buzzkill

Liability question

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I encouraged my kids to climb the tree in our front yard. I would not allow a neighbor's kid to do likewise without their parent being there and agreeing and supervising their child.

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Senor Stevens,

Thanks.

It helps to have the right spelling before commencing a search.

SLAG.

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On 11/10/2017 at 1:50 PM, Buzzkill said:

This is where I struggle a bit.  I was driving tractors in the fields before my age was in double digits.  I bought my first (non-running) motorcycle at 12 and fixed it.  In my mid teens I reloaded my own shotgun shells. Model rocketry was a short-lived hobby for me because it led to building my own rocket motors, which led to becoming fascinated with large booms.  And yes, my parents were aware of all these activities.  By the time I was in high school I had driven bulldozers, combines, articulated log skidders, dump trucks - pretty much anything that had a motor and could move that I had access to.

I said all that to say this:  My personal experiences at that age or earlier make it hard for me to see a couple pounds of blunt steel and wood in the hands of a teenager under adult supervision as some prohibitively dangerous event.  I recognize though that I was not "normal" and that the world has changed a bit since then.   We've gotten entirely too soft imho.

Same here in the 50s I could walk down the street to my favorite squirrel woods with my rifle over my shoulder, at ten years old, and no one would bat an eye and drive the tractor or ride my motor cycle around town.

However that was a different era and it wouldn't happen today without the police and social services getting involved.

 

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Buzz: There are prop companies that not only make stage swords but have insurance we could only dream of carrying. Just because you make it without point or edge doesn't mean it's not a formidable weapon. You HAVE whacked yourself with a piece of 1/4" x 1 1/2" +/- bar. Yes? It doesn't take much of a blow on edge to do damage, pressure cuts and bone bruises are ugly and painful.

Let a company that makes props make them. Donate $ to the cause, it'll make you feel good and help the production.

Frosty The Lucky.

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A lot of good advice has been provided.

As someone who has for a number of years, and many years ago, built sets for both school and community productions, my experience is that even adult actors will find a way to hurt themselves in unexpected ways.  In no way, based on past experience, would I provide any actor, adult or child, with a sword.  Twist a balloon into a sword and the kid will immediately start waving it around and likely hitting people with it.  I am not a lawyer,  but legal advice that I received from a lawyer was that absolutely no release form will protect a person from being sued.... period.   

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I always wonder about people that have to have their guess work opinion heard even when it contradicts the lawyer that had already posted legal facts.  

I felt this had to be heard also, and a big thanks for your non-billable time Slag.

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The actor with the gun was Jon Erik Hexum. I liked the show. He was on the donor list and several body parts were used to save other lives....something I intend to do.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jon-Erik_Hexum

 

As to swords on stage....use polished round bar with rounded tip or synthetic and have them make a "ching" should when they hit. A dime edge is an edge in my opinion.

Chris Lambert about lost a finger on Highlander II when Michael Ironsides hit him.

My guess is that the students will clang them together in earnest when they are alone and they will do so with any material so best to get them something that will be softer.

 

Ric

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Thanks for all the advice.  The play is over.  I did give the SLO to the director, but we agreed it would not be used in the combat scenes.  It was more or less just scenery in the long run, so I put a fair amount of time into something that I probably could have done in about a quarter as much time.  On the other hand it did give me some experience with techniques I would use to make a real sword.

Here's what it looked like.  It's about 25 inches from guard to tip and about 33 overall.  The handle is just wood (not even sure what kind) that I stained.  Everything else is steel.

SLO.JPG.4d022f454f76b02ff5c2d129a09c76bf.JPG

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Slag said it all.  I work in the legal field (paralegal) and liability easily follows the deepest pockets.  Just defending a frivolous lawsuit will set you back several thousand dollars.  The other thing that is being thrown out in this thread is SSO.  That's not going to save you. Buzzkill a jury will look at what the reasonable man believes it is and the average guy or gal will call it a sword.  Imagine trying to explain to a jury in a wrongful death lawsuit that your creation was a SSO even though it partially beheaded someone just through blunt force and weight of the blade. 

In LOTR, a lot of the action swords had light blades made of aluminum so they were not swinging around spring steel blades carrying a ton more mass so if someone did have an oops it might be a bruise or tiny cut, not a huge contusion wound  or loss of a limb. 

I personally think it's ridiculous that the maker of anything is held liable for the user's stupidity, but it is the world we live in.  Just be careful Buzzkill, I'd hate to see some parent sue you and ruin your year. 

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2 hours ago, MC Hammer said:

I personally think it's ridiculous that the maker of anything is held liable for the user's stupidity, but it is the world we live in.  Just be careful Buzzkill, I'd hate to see some parent sue you and ruin your year. 

Agreed.  How far back do you go?  The guy who made the SLO?  The company who turned the steel into the leaf spring? The business that produced the steel in the first place?  The people who mined the ore for the steel?

Like I said though, the play is done and it went without incident.   I spoke with the director at some length and was comfortable that she understood it is not a toy and access to it needed to be controlled by her.   I understand that it still could have come back to haunt me, but I do have a stubborn streak and although I was obviously concerned enough to post the question on here, I still refuse to allow fear of what may possibly happen in the worst scenario prevent me from doing anything.  My general theory is don't live in fear of everything, but don't make yourself an easy target either.

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