Mike89

Hay-Budden anvil a good deal?

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Im new here (First post). I have been blacksmithing blades for about 4 months and my rail section is not cutting it for me anymore, I found a local guy selling a heybudden 120lb anvil for $475. I know Hay-Budden's are good but is that price too much?

anvil  106.jpg

Mod note: Link to sales site removed.

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Hi, @Mike89. Welcome aboard! 

Without knowing where you are, it's hard to answer that question -- anvil prices can vary widely, depending on location. Please add yours in your profile settings, and while you're at it, please go over to the "Introduce Yourself" section and let us know who you are (just make sure to READ THIS FIRST).

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I will update my profile now, but for sake of this post, Im in St. Louis MO. From my research I cannot find many anvils for sale in my area, there is a 215lb 23" long one for sale thats around $800 and thats it.

 

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It looks to be in excellent shape. It's a tool that will last you a lifetime. 

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Good Morning, Mike

A bird in your hand is worth more than two in the Bush. It is not unrealistic. You can always play the barter game when you go and look at it, take cash, but leave some bills in your other pocket. Put $ 350.00-375.00 on top of the anvil and say negative things about the nicks and about it being ONLY a Hay-Bud. As you dicker, bring out a $20.00 bill, one at a time. Some people play this game, some don't. If you really want it, you will own it. If you think it is too much for your bank book, be prepared to walk away from it.

Hay-Bud's are excellent Anvils.

Neil

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Also read up on the TPAAAT about finding the anvils that are not for sale if you need to spend less money.

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Well I was not fast enough, I did however manage to find a nice chunk of 4140 tool steel, its 12-1/2 x 9-1/2 x 4". weighs in at 118lbs and I have access to a heat treat guy who can harden it. Ive been looking at Emerson anvils and found they use 4140 and heat treat to 48-50Rc, so I figure if I can get this chunk to that hardness I should have a anvil that will do exactly what I need it to do.

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A large chunk of drop will be a big improvement from your rail anvil. If your local craiglist is anything like mine the reason you can't find any anvils for sale except for a few is they go fast. The only ones left up there are the 5-6$/lb ones on my local, and they stay there a long time. Anything in the 1-4$/lb range goes FAST by me up here in WI. 

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Mike: You don't need to harden the 4140 plate to make a good anvil it might not be successful and cost quite a bit. On edge it'll give you a lot of depth of rebound making it really effective moving metal. Laying it flat is a mistake there isn't anything you're going to need that much area for. Honest a large face is attractive but you'll only really use an area just a little larger than the hammer face. If it comes to truing up a long piece you can do it easily on a vertical face. Honest, been there done it. 

Use the plate while you're plying the TPAAAT, selling products, those things you think of as practice projects. Well they are but while you're polishing your skills and BANKING product sales you're shopping for an anvil that'll put a smile on your face. Don't get in a hurry and don't turn your back on a new anvil, brand new tools are a nice thing.

Frosty The Lucky.

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20 minutes ago, Frosty said:

Mike: You don't need to harden the 4140 plate to make a good anvil it might not be successful and cost quite a bit. On edge it'll give you a lot of depth of rebound making it really effective moving metal. Laying it flat is a mistake there isn't anything you're going to need that much area for. Honest a large face is attractive but you'll only really use an area just a little larger than the hammer face. If it comes to truing up a long piece you can do it easily on a vertical face. Honest, been there done it. 

Use the plate while you're plying the TPAAAT, selling products, those things you think of as practice projects. Well they are but while you're polishing your skills and BANKING product sales you're shopping for an anvil that'll put a smile on your face. Don't get in a hurry and don't turn your back on a new anvil, brand new tools are a nice thing.

Frosty The Lucky.

I was planning on setting it on its side, and using the 4 x 9-1/2" as my striking face. but thank you for letting me know about not needing hardened.

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Sounds like you're on the right track or maybe I should say the same one I'm on. ;) You might want to check out Brian Brazeals version of an anvil made from a piece of steel plate. I don't recall the name of the thread or what he calls it but it's an excellent concept. I'm sure someone will be along with the name or better yet to a link to Brian's anvil posts.

Frosty The Lucky.

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The other surface I've seen from Brazeale and Steele is the "striker plate". Mild steel plate with a hardy hole for striking with something like a heavy sledge so that mishits aren't as dangerous. I have come upon a 2 inch thick piece of round mild steel about 16 inches in diameter that I am currently trying to find a way to make a hardy hole in that I will use as a striker to go along with the london pattern anvil I picked up today.

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Mike89, 

Is it a professional heat treater you know? What did they quote you?

If it’s cheap enough I’d get it hardened, but that’s just me. Definitely not required, but it’s a deep hardening steel that you can take advantage of. Something you can’t do with mild steel plate anvil, and the hardened anvils rebound does lessen your fatigue.

4140 heat treated with professional equipment and methods can get you to 55rc or higher.

Id orient they way you wanted and Frosty suggested (that mass under your hammer helps keep it immobile so energy goes into your work and not driving the anvil away from the hammer). Definitely grind 3” of that face into a nice radius for moving metal faster, simalar to Brian’s. It could be be a simple or compound radius depending on what you want. You could even grind different radii or semicircle and V swage on the edge 180* opposite, make your anvil stand so the block drops down in a trough to secure it. 

Lets say you paid $75 for the steel, and $125 for heat treating- you will have a fantastic, efficient (with great rebound) anvil. It’s whole face is sweet spot, unlike any othe 110 lb anvil, especially a farriers model. 

Also if you want a hardy holder and you can weld, you can get chain sprocket hubs forsquare shafts with 3/4, 7/8, 1, 1 1/4” square bores. Either weld them to heavy wall pipe, or find a heavy pipe the minor ID can fit in. Bolt it in place and you could actually have replaceable holders to fit any hardy shank size. Some times you can find those hubs online as cheap as $5.

Whatever path you take, congratulations on s great new anvil. I’m sure that even once you acquire a commercial anvil with horn and hardy hole you will still use this one a lot.

All the best

Steve

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Thomas Power's Applied Anvil Acquisition Technique.

In short, tell everyone (yes, everyone) that you are searching for an anvil and one will come your way. Proven to work!

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