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Farmall

Help with slip rolls

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Just picked up this nice slip roll by Berkroy.  Have no idea of capacity or ability of them.  Does anyone have any info on them?  The rolls are about 12 inches wide. 

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Never used one but if I had it I'd put a hand crank handle on it and give it a go. Could roll some wire into rings in the notches on the side. 

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Was going to add a handle.    Just wondering what the capacity might be.    Reckon I'll figure it by testing.  

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The easiest way that would get you close is to look at other slip rolls that are close to the dimensions of yours and see what the capacity is on them. Not exact but will get you in the ball park.

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I'm  not a HVAC or sheet metal guy but am familiar with slip rolls at least to a degree. I took a look around online and hand crank rolls from 10" - 50" tend to be good up to 20 ga. You can roll heavier than they're rated for IF you make multiple passes but that's pretty dicy unless you're good.

This one doesn't appear to be made for hand cranking and powered rolls are usually rated for thicker stock. This would be a good time to pick up test stock starting at 20 ga. and increasing thickness a gauge at a time.

You want to turn the roll in one continuous motion, start and stop on the crank makes for hinky rolling and the thicker the stock the harder it is to  keep the motion continuous and smooth.

Frosty The Lucky.

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Ratings are pretty meaningless in slip rolls.  Claims are made which are so optimized in terms of starting material that any real-world material you choose might not form readily, though of the rated gauge.

That's easy to see on the stomp shears---where the ratings are generally for dead soft sheet and the stated rating is for half-width or (sometimes far) less.  A little harder on slip rolls where it's more about finesse and tweaking to form the materials.

So...skip worrying about it--just give it a shot with some pieces of varying thickness as you can acquire them.  Most likely, it's rated for 20 or 22 gauge as Frosty mentioned. And remember, about every 2 gauges you go up roughly doubles the stiffness (that's not an engineering assertion, it's a broad generalization)  so what seems like a small numerical change might be a huge formability change.

 

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Thank you both.  Exactly what I was looking for.  A starting point.  Now, as Frosty would say - I’m going to roll with it and circle back with findings. I’ll be careful not to slip these

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I found a reference to an add that listed capacity of the 36" model (R-636) as 22 Ga. and the 24" model (R-624) as 20 Ga., so I'd guess you might be able to roll at least 20 Ga steel with it, maybe just a bit heavier.

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