PCornett

Rusted Buffalo Forge 616 alive again "now how do I get this part out.?"

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First off, this pic was grabbed off net cause I am at work and cant find a pic on any device I have with me. 

Now, after five years I have finally gotten the $15 auction find 616 free and spinning. Unfortunately, the top threaded bar and collar( that control the vertical motion) have rusted somewhat so I will have to get new ones machined. Problem is I cant get the collar that connects to the drill shaft to move. Is there something I am missing or am I just not using my manly muscles? 

 

drill.jpg

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By not move, do you mean the shaft wont move? Up & down, around . . ?

Frosty The Lucky.

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TP, even w/o muscles I broke it but I think that was more due to the drill sitting out in a field for years and rusting from inside out...

Frosty, the collar that moves up and down the threaded rod is chipping out from rust on the inside. Looks great on outside but chips away up at top where the wheel is attached. I need to remove that collar to get a new one machined.

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This is where getting more mature helps a lot.  Having a full time+ job and other responsibilities, (I had to hold my youngest grandson yesterday while his mother did some stuff---till his grandmother came and stole him away...very polite little one; didn't even pull my beard---unlike his mother and his Aunt who managed to grab it and pull before they were an hour old!)  means that things tend to sit from weekend to weekend and there is a lot of processes that do better with increased time.

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TP, even w/o muscles I broke it but I think that was more due to the drill sitting out in a field for years and rusting from inside out...

Frosty, the collar that moves up and down the threaded rod is chipping out from rust on the inside. Looks great on outside but chips away up at top where the wheel is attached. I need to remove that collar to get a new one machined.

IMG_20180403_123752.jpg

IMG_20180403_123802.jpg

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At some point it's easier and cheaper to just get another one in better shape...

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Don't know if you got it out yet, but when I was cleaning mine up, I put a tapered punch through that clip on it and hammered it through the opening. As the cross section of taper under the clip got larger, it started the clip moving out.  Once broken free, I just put another piece of flat metal underneath and repeated until the clip came out.

If yours is out, great.  If not this post might help the next guy with the problem.

 

Daguy

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How did you get the handwheel off the threaded piece,  it seems to be an interferance fit, there is a grub screw which I have taken out. My handwheel has partially slid up the threaded collar, it was like that when I aquired it.  The piece below with the u shaped pin, I just used a pair of vice grips and tapped it out. be aware there is a retaining groove in the mainshaft where this pin should go when replaced.  I have tried some heat on the wheel but maybe not enough. 

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 Thomas, borrowed my nieghbours pulley puller a little heat from a propane torch, and lo removed the hand wheel. Have now swapped out the threaded cylinder it was mounted on and have replaced it with one from a wrecked buffalo drill,  and have remounted it with new grub screws. The shoulder underneath the old one was nearly gone, so this one has a good sized  shoulder to take the upward thrust. Thanks for the suggestion. 

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Lots of specialized tools out there that a lot of people are not aware of that can make a difficult job easy.  (I was once remodeling our 100 year old house's kitchen and astounded a friend who was also remodeling a house.  You see I knew about a drywall jack---place a sheet of drywall on it. flip it to horizontal then wheel it in place and raise it up snug against the ceiling and we had TALL ceilings! I also knew that drywall was easily available in longer lengths than the standard 4'x8' so my ceiling only had beveled side joints to mud. Turned a multi-person unpleasant job to a simple 1 man job.)

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You are dead right about that piece of gear, we have a 110 year old timber house and I helped the tradesmen put up mini orb ( coated fine corrugated iron) up for a new ceiling  and what a pig of a job that was by hand, and we have 13' ceilings. 

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