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paradox1559

Ol' rusty build

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I have finally started building my guided helve hammer. I'm very limited in my funds, so I have to work with what I have. I am not trying to win any beauty contests, I'm just trying to get by until I find a proper hammer.

Nothing is welded yet, I think the base is too wide in the current picture.

0910171615a.jpg

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I realise the anvil post needs to weigh more than the hammer. However I can't afford a solid hunk of steel. Is there a temporary alternative that I could find in a scrap yard? Perhaps an I-beam?

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marcusb   

I would use that steel in the hammer frame and not a large base. The hammer will need to be bolted down anyways. I know little giants have hollow anvils, my 50 pound did, and i have heard other brands do to. Obviously a solid anvil is best but LG's have moved lots of metal with hollow ones. 

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marcusb   

Pour an inertia block. I have my hammer bolted down on a dirt floor shop. I left the form boards on it to protect the edges. It will also help with an under weight anvil.

 

 

IMG_2978.JPG

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How much concrete did you use? How deep is it? I'm currently unemployed so money is Extreamly tight, I'm just lucky I know my local scrap yard so well.(I really wish they would hire me)

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You said "pipe in a pipe" wouldn't that be to light? Or is it acceptable to fill it with sand?

I've finally managed to cut my section or track to make dies. I think I'm gonna leave the vertical pieces and drill through them so the track can be bolted down without obstructing the hammer surface. 

Thoughts? 

15058283038262111540237.jpg

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CMS3900   

People usually use a piece of solid bar inside a pipe.  Pipe in a Pipe would work if you filled it with something I suppose.  A lot of these type of hammers I have seen have no UHMW or bushing material. They just stay well oiled and run steel on steel. The life expectancy of the hammer isn't long enough to worry about things wearing out.

I wouldn't worry about a concrete pad under it for starters. If it's on a dirt floor drive a stake in around it to keep from moving and try it. 

Also, that is a good idea on the dies to make them bolt on. RR track dies are more of a drawing die and you will probably find in the future that flat dies are much more useful and want to swap them out as resources become available.

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I have another foot of track that I plan to mill into a flat surface.

Plasma cutter aside, the pieces I have cut out took a lot of patience. Particularly the track surface.

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If you use a 4"+ square of 1/2" and weld the rail head die diagonal you have room for two bolts on the plate and the stock is now worked diagonal and long stuff clears the upright post. A slot and wedges would work as well, but carving it out would he a pita

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If you use a 4"+ square of 1/2" and weld the rail head die diagonal you have room for two bolts on the plate and the stock is now worked diagonal and long stuff clears the upright post. A slot and wedges would work as well, but carving it out would he a pita

I thought about that, I figured track was a bit tricky to weld though.

These dies are 6", should they be smaller?

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How wide a stock are you planning on working? How big is the hammer and anvil? Side loading will cause wear and stress. The with of the anvil or hammer is about right. The diagonal sets are usualy profiled to provide two working surfaces look at stormcrow's hammer and the knives he turns out. . 

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If you use a 4"+ square of 1/2" and weld the rail head die diagonal you have room for two bolts on the plate and the stock is now worked diagonal and long stuff clears the upright post. A slot and wedges would work as well, but carving it out would he a pita

You could get those countersunk bolt heads and weld them in place from the top. Bolting them that way (nut on the bottom) you don't have to worry about your work hitting bolts not that you should have to worry with it too much anyway. 

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