Derek Melton

I'm getting a flypress!

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I just bought a Denbigh #4, it's on the way to me now. It's a tad crusty as far as paint is concerned but it's mechanically sound. It does need a counterweight ball added, which is being shipped with it (a large ball bearing I believe)  I'm not sure how the counterweight should be mounted, I assume it's just a ball with a tapered hole in the middle?  Anyone have any experience with "The Denbigh" presses? Anything to be aware of? I plan to tear it down, clean/strip and re-paint it. The table is a bit narrow but has a large plate with mounting holes to be secured to the floor.

 

So far, this year I've added some great tools to the shop including a much nicer Swedish anvil, an Inline treadle hammer and now the Denbigh flypress.  Super excited!

 

 

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A cracking press. I quite literally grew up using a Denbigh No. 4, making parts for my Dad. It's still in daily use today and he must have had it at least 20 years.

The Denbigh's arm is cast, the posts for the ball weights were not only tapered but octagonal. If your ball isn't original you might have a heck of a time trying to get it to fit.
All the best
Andy

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JHCC   
23 minutes ago, Everything Mac said:

A cracking press.

Especially for walnuts.

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Smoggy   

"...It does need a counterweight ball added, which is being shipped with it (a large ball bearing I believe)  I'm not sure how the counterweight should be mounted, ..."

It basically just sits on the upturned arm ends to add inertial weight, if you need more weight you can add any suitable heavy lump,  barbell weights being an obvious and relatively easy option. Just make sure it's not going to smack you on the bonce as you trun it!

You can hammer lead into shape for extra weight.

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As mentioned shape is not very important. As for fit you just want it to not "rattle" in use.  Can you forge a pipe down to fit the prong and then cast the lead around that? (or bend sheetmetal to form the socket, or leave a larger hole and bed it in epoxy, (grease the prong so it's removable---or wrap it in cling wrap or aluminum foil.)

I will not suggest casting the lead in place as I am a bit touchy about cast iron and thermal shocks...(though with a proper preheat and slow cool....)

My screw press has about a 42" toroid for inertia with depending handles---I like to slip some foam pipe insulation on them to decrease the thwappage (technical term!) when I do get my head in their way...

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I would most likely remove the top arm bar and make a cast of plaster or something else. I wouldn't wanna try and cast it in place either. Talk about awkward! ;)

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As mentioned shape is not very important. As for fit you just want it to not "rattle" in use.  Can you forge a pipe down to fit the prong and then cast the lead around that? (or bend sheetmetal to form the socket, or leave a larger hole and bed it in epoxy, (grease the prong so it's removable---or wrap it in cling wrap or aluminum foil.)

I will not suggest casting the lead in place as I am a bit touchy about cast iron and thermal shocks...(though with a proper preheat and slow cool....)

Now to go wild!  If you are just getting round balls to modify into weights---build claw shaped holders for them that slip onto the prongs!

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Smoggy   

If you really want to cast a lead weight, just make an open mold with a smaller than needed central hole (core), if any at all, easy enough to enlarge and reprofile once cast for a nice sug fit. Looks like your press has square taper tangs so disc or cylinder of lead with sutable diameter round hole would tap into place nicely/

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The material I have is 26lb bricks of pure lead that were removed from a power plant. Since it's pure, it should cast and form easily. Any idea what the weight of the original ball weights on a Denbigh 4 would have been?

IMG_2304.JPG

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BeaverNZ   

I have a number two Norton fly press and the arm that the weights goes on is on an octagonal taper the just requiers a blow with a soft hammer to release it off so you can easily put the arms in a conveniant place to reduce the thwapage to an aceptable level (you can move to eight different positionson the spindle) Cheers Beaver

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BTW are those bricks "cold"?  They used to take the bricks from the radiation labs and set them on the roof of the building for several years to "cool off" when they started getting a bit too "warm"...

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One of the best tools in the shop if you have an innovative mind and make a bit of effort with tooling........Ultimately saves you swinging that hammer and limits the millage your putting up on your shoulder.

Great find, great tool.....wishing you Sir your very good health to enjoy.

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