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I have a friend who is an ER Doctor and she swears by one of those hot paraffin wax tanks for the hands.  I'm looking for one as soon as lockdown is over and fleamarkets are back!

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We do talk about "accelerating bequests" in my line of work, but that's about donors giving a portion of their ultimate gift during their lifetime (and thus seeing its philanthropic impact while they're still around to appreciate it and be appreciated themselves) rather than being hastened towards their respective ends.

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Just figured since I just joined I'd add to the menagerie of Impro Anvils. I was lucky my girlfriend's grandad had acquired a Railtrack Anvil on his farm, not sure what it was used for but it's definitely usable. Only had one day to play around with it, had to resurface it a bit as it had pitted and rusted quite a bit from not being used and being in the elements for so long. I modified it a little bit but after perusing the forums I read hard 90 edges aren't the best so that portion I'll try to modify and soften those just a touch. Added a round shoulder to half the length of it though, felt pretty proud for not having too much experience with angle grinders.

Before:

40372295_Anvil1.jpg.1a064cd77a2ac24d0f245950fc3aedb4.jpg

After:

1713416253_Anvil2.jpg.f7cbee134eae80d0b26924e39748cab5.jpg

Modified Edge about halfway:

246739609_Anvil3.jpg.b39040c9c12d6e043c1175dc5b79fd5f.jpg

It was inherited so if there's any additional mods or anything that's relatively easy let me know, I was formulating a plan in my head to somehow dull the ring, found some vise-grip clamps helped as a temporary solution. Thinking a chain wrapped around the neck of the track and turnbuckled may do the trick.

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Well as it’s inherited suggesting cutting it off the stand and reoriantating it might not be well received. More solid mass under the anvil is good. As it is now it’s good for sheet stock but not great as an anvil. 

Mounting it so that it’s vertical instead of horizontal is best, the smaller striking face is not a problem, and then the web and flange can be modified to provide tooling

 

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If its inherited nature prevents you from making any substantial modifications, then burying the stand in a box of sand (say to halfway up the web) would help with the ringing.

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  • 4 weeks later...
  • 3 weeks later...

Hi all. My first post, but i have spent a couple hundred hours lurking/reading. I am a total rookie, i have only ever banged hot steel in a vise to make "minor" changes, using an o/a torch for heat. (The males on my dads side of the family are all mechanics/machinists/welders or some combination, actually my grandfather is also a millright and tells storys of straightening/"pre-warping"? the 4'+ sawmill blades. He is probably the last member of my family to "properly" use a "real" anvil) 

I just want to say that this one thread has pushed me over the edge, (i already knew about jabod's) i now will be banging hot steel within the week (weather permitting) With a 2lb ball peen and an old 10lb sledge hammer head. The rest of my first sessions will probably be "primitive" as well, wood fuel, and lung power. If im lucky i will have a raised jabod by then, and i might find an old matress pump kicking around somewhere on the property.

P.s. i will be sure to post pics of whatever mounting system i figure out for my "anvil". As well as any other "anvils" i collect and use. (Already started the TPAAAP but not holding out for a good deal on what would most likely be a ferriers anvil, it wont be hard to get heavier pieces of good steel in these parts, or from family once the provincial borders are properly opened up again)

 

Also..  There should be a section just for beginners to put stickys like this in, it might seem a little less daunting for other beginners if they didnt have to search around the forum or use google to find the good stuff like this and the jabod. Or even just a stickied post that links all the good beginner stuff. It is easy to forget that forging doesnt have to be "hightech" and costly.

 

Blacksmithing stickies are click here

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Welcome aboard... There is a good thread Read This First, that has a lot of tips about getting the best out of the forum It's up in the blue banner and as a sticky in most sub forums. Don't know if you have seen it but you probably have seen my posts about it in other threads. Most first posts like yours go into the Introduce Yourself sub forum. There is a sub forum about Show Me Your Anvil Stands and there are some good ideas about mounting sledge hammer heads in it.

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Welcome; sounds like you have a proper background to get into this!  I have been smithing on an allowance for 39 years now and it's amazing what you can buy on the cheap---if you keep your eyes open---CONSTANT VIGILANCE!----and are willing to talk with people.

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Welcome aboard K, glad to have you. Looks like you're going to fit right in here even if you DID read a while before jumping in. Making enough air for a forge is actually pretty easy though NOT making too much can be a problem.

Frosty The Lucky.

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  • 2 weeks later...

You have a good start on it there. How about, re-stacking the lumber into a solid glue lam post, then shifting the rail to the center of the post.  Then a couple lengths of steel strip stock, say 1/4" x 2" drilled for 2-3 screw holes along the length.  You want the screw holes about 1/2 way between the edge of the rail flange and the edge of the wood block. Using a couple three lag screws the plates become clamps that will keep the rail from going anywhere. 

Frosty The Lucky.

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I had originally planned to make myself some hammer holders like I saw on someone else's post, hence why the offset. Could def move them over instead.

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I pulled it back apart and made it a solid piece, no offsets like you suggested. Is this what you were talking about with the stock and lag screws? I didn't have 1/4", this is a little thinner, but seems to be holding nicely. I still need to get the nuts on the back of those lag bolts, I also have a plate on the back side too where they come out. Thinking I'll drop a little silicone around the base/back of the track before I tighten it all down.

20200730_205842.thumb.jpg.d36fa560ead86066a42836e102f05769.jpg

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That's what I was talking about. If you leave the screws so you can loosen them and slip the rail out you'll be able to flip it over once you've run out of web and flange to grind into tools. More bottom tools that way. Eh?

Frosty The Lucky.

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  • 3 weeks later...

That is true mr. frost. What I should have said was "I have never used it to work hot metal only to straighten cold steel when I over bend on my press."  I do have some questions for you if you don't mind a PM.

 

Lerms the germs. :huh:

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This is my mild steel ASO, I made it about 3 years ago and have been using it ever since, after joining this forum and reading about anvils and how they work I'm aware of the flaws in this one. We use a lot of thick plate where I work so getting profiles cut is easy, the total weight not including the stand is 77Kg. I was going to make a new one last year when one of the forks broke on our large fork-truck, the broken one was scrapped and I claimed the unbroken one, it was 250mm wide and 70mm at it's thickest point. Unfortunately I had a week off and when I came back it had been scrapped. I've recently bought a real anvil which I collect on Monday so am retiring this one.IMG_1290.thumb.jpg.5694b7b3f09c44daac96b81253bd3046.jpg

The stand is made using 16mm thick weathering steel and will probably be re-used with the new anvil.IMG_1292.thumb.jpg.e221b775c792636ac494f685b651bef0.jpg

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17 hours ago, Irondragon ForgeClay Works said:

That's about as interesting of a stand I've ever seen, I like it. How stable is it with side to side pressure?

It’s very stable, the hands and feet go through slots in the top and base plates and are welded both sides. Although to be fair, I’m only doing quite light work

 I think I’m going to put a plate in at 1 end for additional lateral stability as the new anvil is considerably heavier.

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