Charles R. Stevens

A collection of improvised anvils

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As a short safety note, dont accidentally hit an unknown metal too hard with your ballpeen hammer while looking for hardened surfaces. I had a corner of the hammer shoot off while trying my luck on a large gear, and it is now somewhere beside my bellybutton down in my fat. I am now iron man.

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the little manhole lid is what i first started banging on metal with. it didnt work very well but i managed to make a couple of rr spike knive. my uncle used to work for tacoma rail and gave me a bunch of spikes, busted knuckle pins etc along with this 24 inch of rail which im guessing weighs around 70-80 lbs.  i just set it up temperarely until i get a big round or some 4x4's and i was thinking about making the manhole lid into a swage block type thing.

 

 

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On 3/4/2019 at 9:57 PM, caotropheus said:

I wonder for how many years is this bit of railroad anvil being used?

Not much different than my setup. Side blast jabod RR track anvil but I don't have a shelter. That shop would be a step up. 

Pnut (Mike)

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That looks good, Randy. I started with a track anvil. But yours has a lot more real estate, so I bet that's nice

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On 12/11/2018 at 4:11 PM, 671jungle said:

face  9 1/2" x 2" Height 25 3/3"

have not welded or weighed it yet, i guesstimate 75-80lbs

OK safety first, lift with your legs!!!!

Second, I love it when you have the mill imprint on the rail. 

I would think this hunk a hunk a steel must ring like crazy. Do you do anything like magnets or chains to reduce the sound? 

On 7/26/2019 at 4:34 PM, Randy Griffin said:

Here's mine.

I made something like that for my nephew. If you can find some RR tie plates you can add a hardy hole. Your cut is much cleaner than mine was. 

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On 3/4/2019 at 9:57 PM, caotropheus said:

I wonder for how many years is this bit of railroad anvil being used?

Cool video, reminds me of the guys in India (or maybe Pakistan) making Kukris. This operation was at least 20 work stations for lack of a better term. I love the charcoal fired forge, that is simplicity in action.   

On 2/3/2019 at 8:57 AM, David Thomas said:

Started life as a 12"x12" I=beam drop. 5 lb 1907 Hay Budden. Still, my ALO is a good striking anvil at nearly 100 lbs even without the lead.

I have always wondered if that would work. It looks great. Is that 2/2" plate? I would assume the plate is A36 or 1018 ie construction type steel like the I Beam?

Looks great and should last for a VERY long time. 

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I have another piece of the fork in another stump for a hardy and pritchel. I just need to drill and cut them.

Mine is very quite.

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On 7/27/2019 at 7:19 AM, eseemann said:

Do you do anything like magnets or chains to reduce the sound? 

I went with this design. More mass under the work. I have thrown about 75lbs of chain on it and it only rings when hitting flat and it is not that bad. I have ground out a hot cut and some curves since this photo. It has worked well, and have made other tools as the needs pop up.  An actual anvil would be nice but this is fine for my experience level.

 1215181450.jpg

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I have been told that the Vikings used chunks of stone for anvils but I agree a purpose built anvil would be nice. 

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I like my vertical rail also. The only problem I ran into was when punching stock by myself. I had to put a log next to the rail and use a motorcycle chain hold down. I have my rail in a five gallon bucket filled with fine gravel. It's more solid than I thought it would be. The rail is only about half an inch short of the height I need on it's own so it weighs about 95 pounds or so by itself. Add the bucket of crushed gravel and it probably weighs about 130 pounds but I'm just guessing about the weight of the gravel. 

Pnut

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Pnut, 

That is not a half bad idea. I have seen people talk about concrete but that cracks but your gravel will keep shifting to fill in the voids. 

There is a guy I saw on YouTube making a fixed straight razor (as in not folding) and he was using something that looked like a 4 inch wide shaft as his anvil. 

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The Norse used both smallish wrought iron anvils and much larger stones for anvils. Working real wrought iron HOT!!! it's quite soft under the hammer; but many extant metal anvils from that period are quite mushroomed.

  Viking is a job description!

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4 minutes ago, ThomasPowers said:

Viking is a job description!

Yeah, I'm getting too old to go Viking, except the occasional Garage/yard sale on weekends. 

Frosty The Lucky.

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I chose gravel because like you said concrete will crumble and I wanted to be able to move it easier. It's down a hill with ruts from runoff from the rain. I couldn't imagine lugging it up the hill with a bucket of concrete attached to it and I didn't want to have to break it out either. 

I was worried it wouldn't be stable side to side but I haven't had any problems straightening stock on the flange. It hasn't budged. I'm sure if I smacked it on the side with a sledgehammer it would tip over but within reason it's pretty stable. I need to find something better to put under the bucket though. I have concrete paver on a bed of gravel underneath it, actually two side by side. I dug out a couple of inches layed down about an inch of gravel tamped it down and put the pavers on top. They have a void in each one though that I don't like. When I see something better I'll fix it but until then they are working. If I was going to use concrete I think it would work best for a rail in a bucket if it was left dry.

Pnut

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34 minutes ago, Charles R. Stevens said:

Steel tripods

Tripods seemed to work well enough for the martians in War of the Worlds. 

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Where are you going to find 6,000 degree rated firebrick for the firebox? Much better for foundry work if you can work out the brick problem. 

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Don't need no steenkeen firebrick with a 6,000f heat ray. Just flick it on and off. Viola! Leave it on for a couple seconds and you have your melt. 

I LOVE my tripod!

Frosty The Lucky.

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