Glenn

It followed me home

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UF,
Find out if the fasteners are threaded or pressed in proper installation, then use a center punch and drill for using an easy out if threaded, or remove the peened area and core out the press fit ones then use something like a scratch awl to collapse the remainder.

Not much fun though. I have removed a few broken studs and bolts that were pressed or threaded this way, but I am talking 1/4 to 3/8 inch diameter.

Phil

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UF,
Find out if the fasteners are threaded or pressed in proper installation, then use a center punch and drill for using an easy out if threaded, or remove the peened area and core out the press fit ones then use something like a scratch awl to collapse the remainder.

Not much fun though. I have removed a few broken studs and bolts that were pressed or threaded this way, but I am talking 1/4 to 3/8 inch diameter.

Phil


I appreciate the advice. Both are no more than 1/8" diameter, possibly less. One (the pin that holds the back shaft to the eccentric bushing) is press fit "Taper Pin", and I believe the other, that holds the rear gear guard on, is threaded. Do they make easy-outs that are 1/8" or less? Edited by UnicornForge

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Saturday I bought an electric heat treat furnace, commercial build but old school from a retired (87 year old!) machinist. Has a thermocouple and temperature set. I may need to look into more advanced controls for it someday. I also picked up 60-70 pounds of mild steel for 15 cents a pound. He's selling down and a friend who went with me picked up 400# of steel---again!

He has some lovely multi hundred pound pieces of tool steel but wants more like a dollar a pound for it. Lovely piece for a tire hammer or treadle anvil and a large hunk of D3 etc. (and a piece of semi round over a foot in diameter and a foot long that I haven't cleaned the mud off the markings yet)

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Friend is closing his lead foundry after 35 years. Among the many things that he gave me were 3 working Eclipse blowers plus 6 burners !!!! Just when I had decided to make a ribbon burner forge......Made in Canada about 1982

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A friend of mine just stopped by and dropped of an old forge blower that his son got with a Lot Bid at an auction. It has no name on it, but does have "S4" cast into the case. It is 12 inch diameter, 3 inches wide with a 3 inch discharge and has a squirrel cage type fan, inside. I asked what I owe him and he said nothing. Price was right, that's for sure. I have pix of it, but can't get them uploaded onto my gallery. Any idea what make blower this might be?

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One of the added benifits of doing demos is people come up and ask "Do I know anyone that would be interested in one of those" as they point at the anvil, forge, postvise or other equipment. Sometimes they pan out. Picked this up today from a fella that came and watched me demo this weekend. It's about as complete as they come. The only thing it needs is a rod on the ash dump. Christmas came early.


John

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CurlyGeorge,
Funny, I thought of him when I saw the forge sitting in the driveway. If you get some pic's loaded of your new blower maybe we can id it for you.

John

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Speak of the devil and here I is.....

Nice rig John and I am real happy for you. Now I have to watch for 1 of those fancy hood scoops like you have!

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I have an old down draft forge that a previous owner had used the hood off a volkswagon beetle as the "scoop".

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I have been very fortunate. My great uncle was a rancher and did his own smithing out of necessity. He has since passed and his property was recently sold off. The new owner graciously gave me the only remaining piece: A 600 pound work table made from a complete piston from an old steam locomotive. My uncle had hand drilled and tapped the side to accept a steel vise. Our county judge donated an 1899 Fisher anvil that used to weigh 155 #, but which had the end with the hardy hole knocked off. This week, I was the proud recipeint of what appears to be an all steel anvil of 156 #. I've yet to find any identifying marks. both anvils were used in farm shops, so have some damage from welders and one has some melting near the step (I suppose from a torch). Both are far superior to the 30 # railroad track I was using, as you can imagine.

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That was nice of them to donate the the items to you especially the old work table for your uncles ranch. Yes either anvil would be superior to the RR track anvil you were using. Post pictures when you can.

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this brown sharp #OY followed me home today for 100 bucks i had offered the guy a month ago or so as he kept listing it on craigslist for a few months for 300 and when i picked it up he also threw in all the tooling for it that i didnt see listed so i feel it was a good deal :D

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thanks for that link unicorn its in a working state as it is but i think it may have ran off a line shaft at one time but a previouse owner had modified a car tranny on top of it insteed of the upper cone pully and its missing the power gearbox for the table feed it will be the winter project as i'm allmost done with my logan so as soon as thats done i'll start looking for the missing parts to put it back to as close to new as i can get it

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Hopefully I've figured out how to attach photos...Here is the forge setup, work table with vice, and my two anvils. I'm told the table is the piston from a steam locomotive. It weighs about 640 lbs. My forge and tools are modest, but I've cobbled them together since I started in October of this year.

Mark

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Edited by New2BS

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I believe that the "piston" may actually be the end cap for a boiler . The holes would be where the boiler tubes would have been swaged into.

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this brown sharp #OY followed me home today for 100 bucks i had offered the guy a month ago or so as he kept listing it on craigslist for a few months for 300 and when i picked it up he also threw in all the tooling for it that i didnt see listed so i feel it was a good deal :D


Sweet deal brother, I'd give a hundred bucks for it if I had to mow lawns to afford it.

You lucky dog.

Frosty

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