Glenn

It followed me home

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Had a phone call from a friend a while ago, the place he worked at were having a clear out and bining anything they don't use.
One of the things going was an old anvil - would I be interested if they let him have it?.......... is the pope catholic?
Anyhow he turned up with the 'old anvil' - a 152kg/3cwt Vaughns cast steel one complete with stand, no damage to the face, all the corners sharp and the paint hardley scratched, just a surface layer of rust on the face.
The anvil was free, gratis, not a dime......I owe him big time!

WOW!! Nice to have nice friends. Ok, enough of the tease....where are the pics!?!?

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Out walking around the other day and a couple of things followed me home. By the tracks was a pin of some sort 1.5" thick and 14" long which has letters GB on top. A chunky piece that looks like it fell off a caterpillar 2" diameter and a tool that I paid for. Don't know what it is. Looks like the end piece is copper.

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That last tool is a blowtorch heated soldering iron. When I say "blowtorch" I mean white gas pressure torch kinda like a Coleman lantern. The end is heated while resting on the top of the torch, there were hooks to rest it on built into many torches. Then it is used to solder whatever you need since it will hold its heat a while. It's for tin, lead, and silver solders. They were used for tin and copper smith work and for electrical power distribution work. I know a jeweler who sometimes uses one for repairs to match workmanship on older pieces.

That example is in good shape. I have a couple that are much worse off. The head looks tight, and the wood is in good shape. Clean it well if you want to use it.

Phil

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mary did some community work at the library, and brought me home,"the recycling,use.&repair of tools" by alexander g. weygers all that for .50 cents...i told here to do more "good"

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That last tool is a blowtorch heated soldering iron. When I say "blowtorch" I mean white gas pressure torch kinda like a Coleman lantern. The end is heated while resting on the top of the torch, there were hooks to rest it on built into many torches. Then it is used to solder whatever you need since it will hold its heat a while. It's for tin, lead, and silver solders. They were used for tin and copper smith work and for electrical power distribution work. I know a jeweler who sometimes uses one for repairs to match workmanship on older pieces.

That example is in good shape. I have a couple that are much worse off. The head looks tight, and the wood is in good shape. Clean it well if you want to use it.

Phil

Thanks for the excellent information! I've learnt something today.

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Soldering coppers were originally heated with charcoal fires before blowtorches and still are for some uses. I have a friend who does upscale copper roof work who prefers his coppers to be heated with charcoal up on top the multi-million dollar homes he works on. Some smiths forge them into wizards or cowboys, etc as the copper is easy to work.

The longer pin may have been used in RR car couplers was it found near the tracks? (It might be a 4140 steel and so hammer making stock!)

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Also, with the soldering coppers, they were sold as a pair, heat one and as you were using it the other one was heating. You would trade the back and forth til the job was done. I have approx 25 of them from 1/4"DIA X 1"long to the big one at 1 1/2" x 4". I enjoy collecting them and have used several in the past.

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If it comes out ok here is a shot of the anvil, on the stand it is about 5inches too low for me so I will have to build it up with blocks.

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a miller deltaweld 302 and 22a feeder stuck its hooks in me,

I swear I couldnt escape it I tryed but it had to great of a hold i had to submit to its will

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they all look fantastic donations, and im sure ill find the room somewhere....:D


im pretty sure your canoe would sink before it left from the shore

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I answered a craigslist add yesterday for some copper chasing tools, and lo and behold, it was a past acquaintance of mine who was listing all kinds of stuff, so when I got to his place he told me he had been laid off and was downsizing his tools, looking to change careers. He showed me a jewelers set that made me want to get into jewelry, and so much else. So as we talked, he kept pulling out more and more, stakes, power hammer tooling up the wazoo, and a pitch pot for backing up your chasing work, even a few chunks of 4140 tool steel, I got so many power hammer tools, I'm not sure what they all do, feel free to speculate on the pics, you might help me figure out what they do!! My brother used to say to me, I could fall into a pile of doo, and come out smellin like a rose, well for today, I'll buy that!!

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... I got so many power hammer tools, I'm not sure what they all do, feel free to speculate on the pics, you might help me figure out what they do!! ...


Most of the power hammer tools shown in the photographs seem to fall into the categories of flatter, fuller, and texturing. The different size flatters and fullers are for flattening or fullering different widths and lengths of spots on a hot bar under the dies. Most of the powerhammer tools shown seem to be ones that are either easy to make or such that you are not likely to use them.

If you are short on funds, then purchasing a few flatters and fullers should be enough to get you started. You could always weld some blocks to the ends of handles for other sizes as you need them. Some texturing tools could come in handy.

My recommendations is to first focus on which tools you may have need for, and can afford. Skip any tools that are easy to make unless you have deep pockets. :D Edited by UnicornForge

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On the chasing tools, do any of them say Craftaid on them? If they do you can find them on the Tandy Leather website. A couple of them look like pear shaders to me. I also do leatherworking, and a lot of the leatherworking stamps could be used on soft metals like copper.

I just found out how to enlarge the picture, they don't appear to be shaders, but you can still check into them if you get into this type of work.

Edited by BIGGUNDOCTOR
saw a better picture

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I take it by the spray of your shop colors you already succumbed to the temptation. Excellent score, good for you.

The three stakes in pic three are from left to right: A sinusoid stake for forming compound curves in sheet. A Button stake and a Mushroom stake for use in a vise. These are used for backing inside hollow forms while working the outside.

I see a number of texture dies, the one with the really strong array of pyramid shapes would be good for patterning damascus billets. The one with all the ball bearings welded on would make a hammer mark texture like we learned to make with a ball pein in shop class.

I also see bark and what might be a wood grain texturing dies.

Then there are a number of flatters and what appears to be a set top tools, The big cone could be for any number of things from a really big counter sink to flaring pipe to make vases or some such.

I see what looks like textured fullers similar to a hack too. I think the curvy one is used on edge or maybe it just got caught in something and scrunched up some. ;)

Then there are a bunch I'd have to ask the maker about. Plenty to modify to your own uses without having to make something from scratch too.

All in all a really useful acquisition Mike.

Frosty

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I spent a day with Brian Brazeal and his family yesterday. Ed, Brians brother, Karen, Brians wife, And Clint, a fellow blacksmith and friend of the Brazeal brothers. What a wonderful day! Brian and i made a hand forged hammer. Brian Sent me home with a bunch of 4140 tool steel, and a mind full of information. I just thought i would post Brians generosity. He just kept handing me material! I think Brian is gonna post the pictures of us making the hammer, as i got to strike for Brian while we made my hammer! The Brazeal Brothers and their family are a very generous group of people. Brian gives so freely of his time and technique. Thanks again for a great day Brian. He even gave me a hot cutter and chisel. A few coil springs, a bunch of leaf spring, and a ton of 4140 in all differrent lengths and sizes. enough tool steel to keep me busy for a long time! http://www.iforgeiron.com/forum/images/attach/jpg.gifhttp://www.iforgeiron.com/forum/images/attach/jpg.gif

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Wow! Was that the same rusty machine a few pages back? looks like brand new! post a pic of what the inside of the dies look like. I have 15 different machines, and alot of dies. if I knew the dimentions of the shafts, i might be able to get you some die designs. I know this post is older, but let me know if your still looking.

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Hello,
Here is the finished results! All thats needed to finish the beader is I need to get my wood lathe restored so I can turn a new wooden handle for it. I'm also looking for any dimensional drawings for dies. I've got a set of Ogee dies right now, but need to turn out some of the others on my metal lathe. Some of the dies I could figure out pretty easy, but some would be dificult. Anybody have a manual for one of these? Enjoy the pics!

Thanks
Richard

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Sorry, this is the post I was replying to. Still learning how this site works

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I spent a day with Brian Brazeal and his family yesterday. Ed, Brians brother, Karen, Brians wife, And Clint, a fellow blacksmith and friend of the Brazeal brothers. What a wonderful day! Brian and i made a hand forged hammer. Brian Sent me home with a bunch of 4140 tool steel, and a mind full of information. I just thought i would post Brians generosity. He just kept handing me material! I think Brian is gonna post the pictures of us making the hammer, as i got to strike for Brian while we made my hammer! The Brazeal Brothers and their family are a very generous group of people. Brian gives so freely of his time and technique. Thanks again for a great day Brian. He even gave me a hot cutter and chisel. A few coil springs, a bunch of leaf spring, and a ton of 4140 in all differrent lengths and sizes. enough tool steel to keep me busy for a long time! http://www.iforgeiron.com/forum/images/attach/jpg.gifhttp://www.iforgeiron.com/forum/images/attach/jpg.gif


Looks like he fixed you up pretty good. .Thanks for sharing with us.

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