Glenn

It followed me home

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Here are a couple of things I got at Trades day this weekend.
The handled hammer appears to be homemade as the facets are not very even.
My wife found the handless hammer for me in a pile of junk! That and a used rasp destined to become a snake cost $3. The vendor then gave my wife the homemade ladle she'd been admiring even though it had a price of $6 on it.
Does anyone recognize the trademark on the hammer head?

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Well it is a nice one!
Could use a new handle (just read your hammer post Frosty, so might try a 'slab' handle) If I had the facilities and skills to reforge hammer heads there would have been a whole flock of ball peins following me home.

Btw, I missed a sack of coke off the list.

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13290.attach

13291.attachI guess I am a little late posting this but this is my circa 1900 mill and circa 1964 lathe.
The lathe was hauled home as a freebie, the mill was a trade.
Took me a couple of years to get the lathe in working shape, the mill should be making some chips soon.

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Well it is a nice one!
Could use a new handle (just read your hammer post Frosty, so might try a 'slab' handle) If I had the facilities and skills to reforge hammer heads there would have been a whole flock of ball peins following me home.

Btw, I missed a sack of coke off the list.


You have an anvil and a hammer don't you? All the more you need would be a fire, tongs, a file, sandpaper and some quenchant.

Pretty short darned equipment list don't you think? ;)

Frosty

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1950's Craftsman Vertical bandsaw. It was my grandfather's. Needs new 'tires' Hopefully I can setup some pulleys and run it slow enough for cutting metal.

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found this small post vice at the scrapyard today when i was dropping off some junk basicly the guy there threw it in the back of my truck and said go weight out so i got the post vice and still got 40 bucks for the scrapmetal missing the spring and the mount but at that price i'll take a few more

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How's the screw?

Making a spring and the mounting plate, yoke and wedges or a more modern mounting plate is no big trick. Remaking the screw is a bit more of a challenge but still doable.

Good score.

Frosty

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So did I,

Picked a really nice post vice yesterday, (I think it was a bargain). Excellent condition, all complete, it has the nice chamfers etc.

Ok I dont need two right now, but Ive got to plan ahead havent I?

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frosty

the screw is in peferct shape when i pulled it out of the pile it turned and opened closed with out a problem it does have a slite bow in the leg but not bad easy fix . the pile were it was looked as if some on cleaned out a barn on a farm .there was a lot of old tractor parts there with it i'm sure ther was other stuff but the pile is 20 feet high and i didn't see anymore tools laying there but i'm thinking to go back monday to look a little more

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also i beleave the vise is from the 18 century also after reserching it some the mount and spring holder is a tennon mount so maybe i'll redo it the right way i'm amazed that the screw is perfect after all those years

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I gave mine a quick clean with a wire brush today, it didnt need it, but I found stamped on the box:

Peter Wright, Patent Solid Box - Have enjoyed reading up on the history.

It is also stamped with a large letter 'B' - any ideas??

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found this small post vice at the scrapyard today when i was dropping off some junk basicly the guy there threw it in the back of my truck and said go weight out so i got the post vice and still got 40 bucks for the scrapmetal missing the spring and the mount but at that price i'll take a few more


I'd say that guy there deserves something hand made in the smithy. Folks like that are handy to know. Next time, might be an anvil, post drill, pan forge, etc. Sounds like he knows you are looking for smithing tools to me. Good score!

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Oh yeah, be sure to make him something nice for putting you onto the vise. Heck, I'd visit regularly and bring donuts.

Frosty

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Yeah, it followed me home. Only it just turned out to be the money I could be saving with geico. Sheesh!

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Some time ago I posted these pics of dies I got at an auction, since then I picked through them and took out about 20 I could use, sold some for cheap, gave some away for a wedding present, and just had a guy come over and pay me 200 bucks for the rest, which is exactly the price I paid in the first place minus the auction comission, must be a good day! Oh yeah, I kept the good steel cart they came on!!

Edited by divermike
forgot somethin

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Had a good friend (non smith) who went to an auction and picked me up a cone out of a pile of scrap, a small one good for travel, so I made a tool for it to fit in the hardy hole if I wanted it to, the top cone was missing, so maybe at some point I'll hammer one out, bit I don't think I'll need it, he owed me a favor and would not tell me how much he paid, and would not take a dime, he just knew I be tickled, well how right he was, sheesh, what a pal!!

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It was large item week in my home town. Liberty, Mo. I had set alot of crap out onthe curb, then the wife ask if I was going schrounging? No I have to much inventory now. (Refering to all the junk behind the garage.) My son came over and he was looking at some of the stuff the neighbor's set out in their yard. I told him not to drag anything over. When he did come over, I ask him if there was anything good over there? He said there were a bunch of whitsh burnt bricks. I went over and sure enough about 50 or 60 used fire brick, all in good shape. Yep I got the dolly and shuffeled them home. They came in handy used some, traded some, still have some.

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Coming home from Tannehill earlier this month I found a recycling center. They had about 18 old wagon rims for sale. Picked up a few just for something to spend my money on. Got home and cut one of them in half. Broke it apart and it was wrought iron. Went back and bought all 15 that were left for a really good price. So far out of 9 that I have cut up, 7 of them are wrought iron. This really surprices me because I was always told that rims were not wrought iron. The last photo shows the metal that was not determined to be wrought iron. I will spark test it and do a water quench to try to figure out what type of metal it may be. The size of the rims is 2-4 inches wide, 3/8-1/2 inch in thickness and the smallest rim I found was a minimum of 9ft 6 inches in diameter.

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Edited by wassomeoneelse

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Wrought Iron Tires were usually made from the poorest grade of Wrought (it wasn't hammer refined) as this was a costly and time consuming process. In the past I have used a lot of Wrought tire iron to repair old Woodworking Tools for others, because if you use material similar to what the tool is made of and forge weld it, like would have been done in its day. It does not take away any of the tool value.

One thing I have found, is that if you bring it to a nice Orange color and work it from both sides under a power hammer lightly, it refines it somewhat and you can do with it what you want. Just DON'T bring it up to Welding heat and hit it hard as it will more or less explode. And don't work Wrought when its too cold or it will split on you.

If you have never worked Wrought before, you will be surprised at how soft and easily it works when its at an Orange or a little hotter.

Enjoy

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