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I Forge Iron

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Agreed. A fuel cylinder or an O2 cylinder would certainly require flooding, as fuel fumes or extra oxygen plus a spark or two could make things sporty.

With a cutting torch, I think it was Frosty who pointed out that combustion products and uncombusted fuel building up inside a cylinder could also cause problems, regardless of what was previously held in the tank.

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I did find an auto darkening helmet for 10 euros second hand, so like you guys said it should be easier to weld with it than without it. Once it arrives I'm going to start a bit of practice welding.

~Jobtiel

 

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Some auto darkening helmets have batteries that need to be replaced occasionally and others have solar panels to keep them charged. I have both and like the solar ones the best. 10 euros (11.57 US) sounds like a good deal.

BTW: If it doesn't come with an operators manual, most are available as a download online.

Edited by Irondragon ForgeClay Works
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Even the solar powered ones have batteries, which are not always designed to be replaced. Mine was unfortunately in this latter category, but with a replacement battery from the store and some creative bodging, it now works great.

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Found this on the clearance shelf at the TSC near me for $4.99US. Figure I can use it for some hot rasping and when it's worn out use it for a tomahawk.  Never heard of the brand before so I'm somewhat skeptical of the HT.  Have to find out if it's case hardened or fully hardened.  First new farriers rasp I've ever had :)IMG_20211013_142825.thumb.jpg.35c7bfa5d49f6925fc62b93c046f3da6.jpg

Pnut. 

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I got these at the flea market. The first three pair were hoof nippers that i forged into v bit tongs. The third pair are flat bit tongs that i bought pretty cheap, and the last two are twisting wrenches i made from old adjustable wrenches.

20211013_145002.jpg

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A tip on the auto shading welding helmets, they have replaceable inner and outer lenses to protect the main shading lens.  Keeping them in place and clean or replacing them when too far gone will help your vision while welding and keep the main lens safe. 

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The old auto darkening welding shields without  batteries were "outlawed" as there was a slight lag between arc light hitting the solar panel and the shield darkening, not to mention those times when your arm or part of the work blocks the arc light from the panel. 

Welding supplies carry the plastic lens covers on the shelf, I get them in packets of 10 IIRC. Then I tried using motorcycle helmet "peel offs" stick on clear plastic lens covers intended to peel off when your motorcycle helmet face shield got muddied up. Those are okay but not great, I stopped using them when I ran out.

Frosty The Lucky.

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2 hours ago, USANewbie said:

twisting wrenches

Those old Ford (monkey) wrenches do make great twisting wrenches. I have also converted old nippers into tongs. One really old pair made out of wrought iron, is now a pair to hold RR spikes by the head. You did a nice job converting all of them.

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I recently picked up a ford wrench cheap as the moving jaw had the tip broken off, plenty of meat to hold up to 1/2" stock though.  Trimmed the top jaw to match the lower one and will be using it for my students who seem to have trouble seating stock to be twisted at the back of the jaws to be closer in line to the torque.

USAN, nice set of mods, I once picked up an incredibly ugly home made set of quite large nippers, (had the end of the bits steeled!), and made them into a set of "Hot Firebrick Tongs".  Very useful around my propane forge with stacked firebricks for the door!

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The guy said it still works, it's a cheapish brand and still quite new, so I'll see if it works good enough. If not I'll toss it. 

I'll keep check on the replacables and see if I need to change them occasionally.

Thanks guys!

~Jobtiel

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Kubotas are great. Just keep it well maintained because replacement parts are not cheap. Not sure what year it is but some old ones are hard to find parts for at all. 

Mine is a 3cy. 4wd Diesel as well. They are tough tractors. Not overly powerful but powerful enough. Like a tank. 

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Not sure on the exact year yet, it’s a b1550 they were made from 88-97 

ive worked on a few for people an ive owned a couple little kubotas over the years, and your definitely right the parts are pretty steep,

I had a customer bring in a kubota diesel zero turn mower awhile back, he thought it had a blown head gasket but when I torn it down I found a hairline crack on the number 2 cylinders exhaust valve seat that went into the head, the new head came out to $1800 an all the gaskets came out to another $500 

this ones gonna need some tlc, It hadn’t been run the last 5 years before I got it, an had been setting out in the weather, 

I evicted the mice an redwasps and spent an afternoon going through it, and finally got it running agin, it’s gonna need a thorough tune up an I’ll have to fix some hydraulic leaks an make some repairs here and there but overall I think it’s gonna be a pretty good little tractor when I’m done with it, 

 

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