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I Forge Iron

It followed me home


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Picked up a stick welder yesterday, runs on 220V. I got it from a guy a few streets away. I'm going to use it to weld up a guillotine tool and probably spring swages and the like.

It's not a big fancy machine, but I think its good enough for that. My brother who's a good welder will help me learn how to use it properly.

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~Jobtiel

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I don't have one no, I only got the hood that the guy gave with it, I've been looking and those things cost more than the machine did, so back to hunting for one of those.

It's gonna be a bit before I'm going to use it.

~Jobtiel

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 Aside from the welder, What is your vision worth? 

There are decent usable auto shading hoods out there at affordable prices. I did move up to a better higher quality one because I weld a good bit, but the cheaper ones work ok. Cheapy tool store one is around $45.usd 

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An auto darkening face shield is great but until about 5 years ago I only had a old fashioned dark glass one and they work fine, position for your weld, nod to drop the hood and ark up. 

My auto darkening one is more convenient though. 

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Yeah I have a welding hood so my eyes are protected, and I'm not planning on welding often. I'll keep an eye out for an affordable auto darkening hood. but for now I don't think I need it to weld some small things.

~Jobtiel

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Those are governed by the ISO 12312-2:2015 standard, not the ANSI Z49.1:2005 standards for welding PPE. 

It’s notable, though, that welding shade numbers are cumulative, so if you’re wearing (for example) a pair of shade 5 glasses under a shade 8 helmet, you should be good. 

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I have trouble with my glasses trying to fall off, especially if I am welding at an odd angle, but I can’t see anything up close without them. Someday I will buy a magnifier for the hood. 
 

These auto-darkening lenses are a rather new thing. When I learned to weld there were none. MIG is not hard without them, but stick is awkward. I think it would have been much easier for me to learn had they been around back then.

I can’t say the less expensive ones are worth having, but I do know that with most tools (and golf clubs) there is a price at which only someone using the tools for hours each day would really benefit or even notice the difference in most cases.

Tack welding with stick is the area where I really find auto-darkening lenses to be extremely handy. I had always hated doing it before. Now, not so much. 
 

These followed me home yesterday. Two bells and two dishing stumps. The local welding supply shop was tossing them. I said, “You are doing WHAT!!!!”  He let me have them. 
 

Being CO2 tanks, an explosion while cutting them shouldn’t be an issue to be overly concerned about?

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Depends on how you’re cutting them. If with an abrasive wheel, make sure to unscrew the valve from the cylinder first. If you’re using a torch, shut it off and get an abrasive wheel. 

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Close your eyes and tell me what you see.

If you prefer life with your eyes open and able to see, then protect your vision.  Use a couple of electric flood lights near the material you are welding to make using a shaded welding lens easier to use.  Or move the project outside so the sun shines on the area you are going to weld.

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Halogen flood lights so you can see your setup with the hood down helped me a lot with stick Currently I have to use the electric stove plug behind the propane stove we put in to weld so right out the kitchen window is a welding table...Funny I only weld when my wife will be gone for the day!   Got a 50 amp circuit in the shop for when power arrives!

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I figured I would just use a cutting disc on an angle grinder. I still don’t have a torch. 
 

I am going to remove the valves and flood them with water first.  I have been wanting to try a project like this for a long time. 

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