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I Forge Iron

It followed me home


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Billy, I still wear my boonie hat when hiking or working in the yard.  When was your dad in Viet Nam and what unit was he with?  Tell him that there is a blacksmith/VN vet you know through IFI.  And tell him, for me, "Welcome home, bro."

GNM

late of 1/C/1/12 Cav, 1st Cav Div (Airmobile), RVN, 1970-71

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I often wear a wide-brimmed Amish straw hat when working in the yard or garden. It's quite good at keeping the sun off my neck and out of my eyes, and it's lighter and cooler than my usual Aussie slouch hat.

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Glenn, wow that is pretty cool just from a posted image. 

The photos themselves are not in bad shape i am just afraid to take them out of the frames and do damage to them. My images are bad becuase of the glass and plastic. 

Thanks ya'll for the advice but i am pretty much computer illiterate, lucky to be able to post a comment, so i would be better off taking them to a professional.   

George, my dad has a straw hat kind of like the one JHCC wears he uses now. I want to say he was with the 583rd engineers. I am not sure were he was in Vietnam, he dont talk much about it other than "One night we got drunk and..." He was there from 68-70. In 68 when they were drafting my grandfather, he was a tanker in WW2, told my dad to enlist so he did not end up drafted into the infantry. So he did, along with my uncle on the buddy plan, and chose to be an engineer. He told me once that about a week before he was to report to boot camp he got his draft notice in the mail. May have dodged a real bullet there. 

 

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I made a stop at the local scrap yard a couple weeks and found this;  It just hummed when I plugged it in but I found that end cover on the motor was dented preventing the motor fan from turning.  I removed it and spent a little time with a hammer and fixed it.  It now ran but the cylinder didn't move so I put a new charge of hydraulic oil in it.  I was able to crush a 1.5"square .125" wall  piece of tubing with no issue.  I need to reconfigure it so that there is some pass through ability and make some dies.  Sadly when I went to pay at the scale, I was told no more picking!  They had a new insurance company or policy and no pickers allowed.  I also snagged this large eye bolt on that last trip - hammer is for scale.

            

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At least your last trip scored big! Very nice. Risk aversion is ruining us. I'm not saying we should all work without PPE or not use common sense self preservation, but the bureaucratic group think that all risk is bad is stifling. "Land of the fee, home of the risk averse" 

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They have shut me out before and have always have let me back in after some amount of time.  They did close it up to pickers through 2020 because of covid as well.  At .20 cents a pound, it is my favorite place to shop.

 

Here is another new treasure that came from a Craig's list ad.  It required a little work as the nut was loose and the jaws would move back and forth about an inch.  Easy fix.  It is a Parker and is about as heavy a thing that I would want to lift.

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33 minutes ago, TWISTEDWILLOW said:

I wonder if you offered to sign a liability wavier if they would let you?

The lawyers can probably answer this better, but my understanding is that unless liability is limited by law (e.g., Ohio's "inherently dangerous activity" laws about being around horses), then even a signed waiver does not take away the right to file a lawsuit that the company would then have to spend time and money defending against. With lawyers' fees ranging into the hundreds of dollars per hour, it's just not worth it, even if they manage to defend successfully. 

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John is correct.  A liability waiver is a defense in a law suit, not proof against the filing of a lawsuit.  The plaintiff can argue that the waiver is an ineffective defense on various grounds such as it was not "knowing."  That is, the person who signed it didn't really understand the rights they were waiving or the danger they were accepting.

Waivers of liability are most effective as deterrents against someone filing a lawsuit if they get injured.  They figure that they can't successfully sue (sometimes that is true) because they signed a waiver.  So, it never gets that far.

No one is required to accept a waiver of liability.  Sometimes it is a requirement of a liability insurance policy.  In Gazz's case the insurance policy may state that only employees are allowed.  To allow others ("invitees") would mean a higher insurance premium.

Or, the junk yard may have a sole source buyer.  That is, by contract, they can only sell to a certain purchaser and no one else.

There are some legal areas where a person is required to accept liability such as, as John mentions, equestrian activities (in many states) or skiing (in CO and maybe other states).

Also, there are some areas where you cannot waive your rights.  These are usually federal or constitutional rights such as a person's civil rights or, say, their rights under the Fair Labor Standards Act.  So, a woman can't validly waive her rights to be treated equally regarding pay in exchange for a job and anyone can't agree to work extra hours without being paid overtime or "off the clock."

I would suggest that Gazz try to offer a liability waiver but don't be surprised if the offer is declined.

Another tactic might be to become a "business customer" which means that you get a sales tax license and, at least theoretically, you are reselling what you buy or using it in the course of your own business.  There is some hassle to do this but it often has enough advantages to justify it.

"By hammer and hand all arts do stand."

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Not as good a work around would be to get a  worker to keep an eye out for things you might like and  put them to the side and bring them out to you.  Tipping the yard a dozen doughnuts each time you go to look over the finds can help.

As for liability fear; I think I got in good with my local yard when their dog bit me and all I did was to tell them about it and borrow some hydrogen peroxide to rinse the bite and bound it up with my bandana.  The don't worry about me doing something stupid and suing! 

Nice lifting ring, rings from ring and pintle tow hitches make good dishing forms as well.  I have a selection of rings by my screwpress to use for bottom dies and more that have 1" sq pieces welded to them for use as dishing forms on my anvils.

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I've brought donuts to the yard more than once. Showed up with my six year old in tow once (this was more than a few years ago),  they said 'keep her close to you and it's fine'.  Her small pink work boots, overalls and safety glasses might have had something to do with it.

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The scrapyard is a funny place.  One guy is always complaining about something I'm doing, parking my truck where it's in the way which is everywhere it seems or for making piles of stuff I want to pick up when I am done picking since I have to park the truck somewhere else.  This guy would not care where you were when he was running the big magnet crane and would swing that thing feet from where you were even if you were trying to stay out of his way.  Another guy there is very nice and points out good stuff that I might miss and even suggested that I bring a load of scrap, weigh in, dump it, fill up on pickings, weigh out and only pay for the difference in weight.  It's a family owned and run business.  I tried the donut thing and the beer thing but got a no thanks.  There is another yard I can go to but it's a 45 minute drive and the place sells stuff considering what it might be worth as a useful thing and not by the pound.

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Das that is pretty cool. 

Went to the AAMCO i used to work at yesterday and brought this home. The kid that saved it for me, i stop in once a month or so, me and the guy building transmissions are still good friends, said i have to make him a sword for it. I replied that i am not a bladesmith, never made a sword but what the heck may be fun to try. 

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Das, I'll be giving that a try. There is a video of dog being made from one.  Just wondering if anyone has had any luck reforging one into a handled hot chisel.

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A quick trip to the industrial surplus place netted a 32” three-speed shop fan and a dozen+ pairs of Kevlar gloves (the latter for less than what folks were charging for a single pair at Quad-State).

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The chisel actually started out being an ax. Then i burnt off the claw end some so lopped them off, flattend for a striking surface and took the curve out of the bit. Works quite well. The punch same just drew the hammer down to a taper.

JHCC, i am jealous of that fan.  

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