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I Forge Iron

It followed me home


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On 7/13/2021 at 5:38 AM, Jobtiel1 said:

I tried to make the fire deeper with firebricks, but way the forge is build, I've been unable to do this well enough to heat hammer stock. The forge has an cast iron piece that houses the clinker breaker, and that sits up about 2 cm from the bed of the forge. With the fire bricks to make it deeper there is still not enough depth to make a bigger fire.

Jobtiel1 - I originally used brick to build a deeper fire, then I nearly set my car on fire. My rivet forge has a stamped pan which made it easier to install a sheet metal ring (see pictures). The ring is made from a scrapyard buy of some stainless steel sheet (about 28 AWG/0.7mm). I cut two pieces 6.5 inches/~160mm wide by 20 inches/~500mm long to make a ring about 12 inches/300mm in diameter. Note that I folded over about a 1/4 inch/~6.5mm of the top edge for safety reasons.

The ring is held in place with some 'L' brackets made with smaller pieces of the sheet. I used a small hand punch to make all holes in the sheet and used existing holes in the pan for securing the ring in place.

I've had continuous issues trying to insert/attach images to this post, hopefully the links to images in the Gallery work.

https://www.iforgeiron.com/gallery/image/40886-portable-forge-pan-1/

https://www.iforgeiron.com/gallery/image/40887-portable-forge-pan-2/

 

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Picked up a spring pack off a 1 ton box truck. It came back and was being held in the warehouse at the dealership for 30 until the warranty went through. Since I tend to pop in from time to time to check their scrap bin they gave it to me free of charge.

After about 10k miles the center bolt sheared off, so the springs themselves are almost new. The powder coating will need to be ground off, but I'll take that deal for ~100# of spring steel.

IMG_2021-07-20_20-34-53.jpeg.4b03e724a4156db4254a950b4a90d77c.jpeg

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Sadly no. They said they will give me a call whenever they replace some as they are more than happy to give them to me. They just don't replace them very often I guess. I did see some break drums I almost grabbed to attempt a break drum forge.

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This is the first pack of leaf springs I've come across at this place and I was just lucky it was low mileage/off one of their delivery trucks. I have had much better luck with coil springs. It really depends on the type of place and when you go. I've gone plenty of times when there were just a pile of rotors and not much else. Other times I walk out with a couple springs or something. My best advise is to be on friendly terms with one of the service guys and have them let you know when things come up. They probably can't hold them for you, but they might give you a heads up.

I don't like that everything is powder coated now though. That stuff is a pain to get off and I really don't recommend burning it off. Been there, done that, the smoke is nasty.

I tend to use rail clips rather than coil springs nowadays for round stock. I was given a whole bin of them and I prefer to straighten those & clips vs grind off powder coating.

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Frazer, if it is powder coating it sets at 300F. Heat them up past that and scrape it off. I would think it is more of an epoxy paint as that would be faster than powder painting - dip or spray compared to spray and run through a 350F oven to set it. Manufacturing is all about getting it done fast and inexpensively. Powder paint is great for many applications, I'm just not sure that springs are one of them.

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Two weeks ago I noticed what was called a 'Cobbler's Anvil' at a local Auction Hall's on-line event. The one picture for the listing had a neutral background and didn't have anything to indicate size. On a whim I put in a bid of $20 CDN. I was e-mailed last Tuesday that I'd won at $18 total cost. I haven't weighted it yet, so could still be running 4 to 5 dollars/lb.

On pick-up, I found it to be a fabricated anvil, Top plate's an inch thick, 6" long by 3 " wide. Height of 6" from face to the base with a spike going into the wood stand. Face to bottom of stand 27". The stand even has brackets to secure it to a solid floor (wood or cement, no gravel). The welds are failing on the right side, Ill have to get my son to redo them.

It's relatively small compared to my other anvils, but should be useful for small work.

C Anvil Full View.jpg

C Anvil Left.jpg

C Anvil Right.jpg

C Anvil Top.jpg

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8 hours ago, ThomasPowers said:

Find a shop that does lifts and lowers;

Also check out the local school district bus shop. I was talking to the mechanics at ours and got a call from them to come and get some bus leaf springs. All in all about 400 pounds of springs followed me home, still have a bunch left.:)

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Were they brand new or used?  Lift and Lower places often have minimally used springs.

I've found that I only need to "stock" a couple of pieces as it is so easy to find.  I do have a couple of "special" pieces---like ones with tapered ends, saves a whole lot of drawing out for some projects! Also extra heavy or extra light, again saving a lot of work rather than trying to produce extra thickness or thinness with the hand hammer.

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I hear a lot about microfractures in old leaf springs. I've made a few (very few compared to most of you) blades from some that were old and even pitted (which I realize doesn't mean it had been subjected to repeated flexure.) I didn't have a problem with them. Once you get those stress fractures up to near welding heat and pound on it, it seems to me it would either propagate, and you could see it, or weld back together and reform the crystalline structure. Is that right?

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Or form cold shuts in the material, especially if corroded.

Not so difficult to find good ones that running the possible risk of an "unknown" one makes a lot of sense.  I do know that crack issues seem to have been more prevalent up north where they salted their roads.  (But that is just my experience.) 

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Often when a microfracture propagates in a finished piece, you can see from the surface of the break what part was the old fracture and what part the new. The former will typically have some degree of corrosion, while the latter will be fresh and unstained.

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TP -You are right, of course. I was just curious. There is such a thing as chloride stress cracking but I've only seen that in some stainless steels. Once the company I worked for (a corrosion company no less) had to put a sign up on an unmanned offshore platform.  The sign fell off before the week was out because they didn't pay attention to what kind of stainless they used. 

JHCC - I've seen that in pipe failures as well. In some cases it was corrosion that started the crack and once it had a weak point mechanical failure from fatigue took over.

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"Catastrophic propagation" is the term used in my MatSci classes.  The thing about corrosion in a crack is that you can get inclusions if you forge weld it or it won't weld in the "dirty" section.

One of the most "fun" examples in that class was where a crack had initiated from the engraving of the ID number for the fancy steel and heat treat, required by the purchaser!  Unfun ones included a fractured propeller shaft at a long way to fall up in the sky (Stress corrosion cracking if I remember that one.)  That class made me try to  avoid a lot of "engineered" things for a long while  as it was full of such failures that hadn't been taken into account when engineering...

 

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Thank you JHCC, I was hoping to get the tools a little cheaper since I was buying so many but he wouldn’t budge, that being said I figured the cheaper price on the block made up for it. 
 

the guy is selling off his father’s blacksmith shop, and he had lots of other stuff but I was on a time crunch to get back to my repair shop this morning before customers start showing up, so I couldn’t stay,  and it was an 45 minute drive back, 

But I talked to him and found out he actually lives in my county and it sounds like he may bring his next trailer load by my shop before taking it to over the flea market in the next county over, 

so I might get first shot at more tools later. so I’m crossing my fingers! 

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Considering that a 3lb Harbor Freight cross-peen hammer is ten bucks, eleven bucks each for quality top tools is totally reasonable!

 Sounds like a great opportunity for getting some really good tooling. I must confess to feeling no small degree of envy!

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3 hours ago, TWISTEDWILLOW said:

But I talked to him and found out he actually lives in my county and it sounds like he may bring his next trailer load by my shop before taking it to over the flea market in the next county over

  I think you would be doing each other a favor snapping it all up.  Nice find!

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