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Frank mentioned that since the early iron used in Santa Fe started in Spain, travelled by sailing ship to Vera Cruz Mexico and then went up the Camino Real by Oxcart to Santa Fe, it was used *very* sparingly and many things that were wrought iron in Spain were done in wood in Santa Fe---like window grills.  (IIRC a good rate of speed for Oxcart on the Camino Real was 1 mph and don't forget time spent on watering and grazing the oxen!)

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Fleamarket report: 1 ballpeen, 1 crosspeen hammer US$1 apiece, 4 soldering coppers $5, small rockbreaker digging rod $3

Yesterday I helped a fellow smith pick up a band saw from an old junk filled garage, and this is what followed me home, some letter and number punches, and some old tractor drags or something, not sur

I have a smallish spalling hammer I "converted" into a straight pein and the balance isn't good. the Face side is too heavy making it darned tiring to use. I have given thought to cutting the face sid

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6 hours ago, M.J.Lampert said:

where do yall get those books, i am wanting a few

eBay, mostly. Occasionally I’ll purchase directly from the publisher (such as Lost Art Press or Blue Moon Press) for things that aren’t available elsewhere. I also keep my eyes open at used bookstores and antique shops. 

Also, stay in touch with people. I recently got a major haul of books and magazines from a smithing friend who was simplifying his library. 

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I've been looking for a reasonably priced copy of Early American Wrought Iron by Albert Sonn. I thought I hit the jackpot and found a copy for $43.80 unfortunately I misread it with the decimal in the wrong place:o it was actually $438.00.

Pnut

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Stopped by the tranny shop i used to work in to say hi and scored a few things. 

An out put shaft for a 4T65, a pump shaft for a CD4E, 5/16" hex, a couple brackets to hold torque convertors in during transport, pins, a hand full of engine lifting eyes, 2 big tow hooks, and a Honda power steering pump. The pump runs off of the speedometer gear in Honda transmissions, you can hook a drill up to the little shaft end and they make great fluid transfer pumps. 

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pnut, you looking for the earlier individual books or the later version where all three volumes were combined into one book?

eBay has one of the latter for $75 OBO. 

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I bought my copy of Sonn (the 3-in-1 version) for $20 in an antique shop in Buffalo, NY. It really does pay to keep your eyes open.

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I was seeing a couple raptor claws and some skeleton parts, Scott.

I'll have too see if I can find a Honda power steering pump for cheap, a cable drive, drill motor powered, transfer pump sounds REALLY handy. 

Frosty The Lucky.

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  Jerry, I would tear that pump apart.  I'd wager there's some positive displacement gear "eyes" in there somewhere....  Hopefully not plastic.  :)

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I would like to have the three separate editions but I'm not picky. I'd be just as happy with the 3 in 1 edition. I'll have to start keeping a closer eye on eBay. 

Pnut

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You could be right Scott but how would I get my neo-prehistoric classic raptor peeing in the fountain to do it's thing? A boy doesn't want to mess with a raptor's plumbing you know!:o

Frosty The Lucky.

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  I'll have to get back to you on that one.  I'm drawing a complete blank.  Gravity feed maybe?  It might dribble a bit!

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Posted (edited)

A post vise followed me home on Monday. My boss also plays with hot iron and had a spare sitting in his shop. It looks a little rough but is functional. For $50 USD, I’m certainly not going to complain about a little rust and flaking paint. I figure a couple hours with a flap disk and some new paint will have her back turning heads again. 
 

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Edited by Bantou
Forgot to include the price
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7 hours ago, Nodebt said:

I'd wager there's some positive displacement gear

The pump is an internal gear pump. It has one small drive gear with a larger internal toothed ring gear running eccentric to the drive. like a Ford transmission pump. I believe what you would want is an external gear pump where it just has 2 gears squishing fluid between them. Honda transmissions do however use that style of pump. 

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5 hours ago, DHarris said:

Wire wheel is better than a flap disk. It only removes the rust and not the iron. 

Thanks for the tip. I’ll pick one up today. 

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A buddy of mine just replaced the forks on a 10000lb telehandler forklift.  Dropped off both the tines and all the hardware to secure it.   Each fork took 3 of us to get it off the truck.   Now I guess we need to start chopping it up into hammer blanks. 

Suggestions? 

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There used to be a nice webpage on making an improvised anvil from a 180# fork lift tine; total cost was US$25 for welding...Unfortunately it looks like that website has lapsed and is no longer around.

AHA!  Found it on the wayback machine:

 http://web.archive.org/web/20090620002021/www.marco-borromei.com/fork.html

 

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BillyBones,

 check to see what the tow hooks are selling for. The ones for second gen Dodges are going for upwards of $100 a pair.

 

BillNelson,

the forklift manufacturers that I contacted and got replies back from said 4000 series steels like 4140, and 4340 were used for the standard forks, while the "larger" - not stated as what large meant - were a different alloy.

You can make a post vise out of a pair of forks and a screw type house jack.

 

Well, the boat made it home, and I stripped the old rotted plywood decking off yesterday. Did some measuring, and along with some research, confirmed that I was waaaay off on the fuel capacity. 34" in diameter and 21' long. Same length as my 72 Olds ambulance. It looks like they are most likely centerline tanks off of an F-4 Phantom. This would make sense since I am near Nellis AFB, a fighter base.

Along with the boat is a trailer made from 3" channel iron that can be utilized for other projects. No paperwork on the trailer, and the axle is no good, so material it is.  May be an image of outdoors

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16 hours ago, Bantou said:

Thanks for the tip. I’ll pick one up today. 

Be careful with it. PPE is essential and always be ready for it to catch and kick off at an odd angle. Of all the dangerous tools we use, a wire wheel is right up there with the worst of them. If you have an apron, wear it. If not, expect to be pulling wires out of your legs and belly. 

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Yes, be careful with the wire wheel.  Years ago I used on to remove paint from a metal cabinet.  As worked, I could feel the wires coming off and hitting me, mostly in the legs.  Tough it out I thought, just a little pain.   Later that night when getting undressed I found that pants would not come off easily, they were pinned to my legs!  One of the wires was deep under the skin on my shin and was there for years until it finally dissolved.  I have found the cup type wire wheels a little friendlier to use.  With either, protect your eyes!

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Gazz... I don't think it dissolved. It's either still in there or it came out without you noticing. Good point about the wires though. Those little buggers are like tiny spears and like to find squishy things to embed themselves in. 

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yeah those wire wheels can do a great job but I am always spooked when using them.  A few weeks ago while removing the rust from my new to me post vice I didn't notice our 8 year old daughter had walked outside ( I went out to the driveway to keep the rust cloud out of the shop) and was standing at my 4 o' clock.  I quick discussion on PPE and letting her feel the sharpness of the wheel with her fingers was enough to get the point across. 

 

So she then proceeded to ride her skateboard down the driveway and faceplant in the street.... thank goodness for helmets..

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Almost all of the wire wheeling I do is with my cordless Black and Decker, it tops out at like 750 rpm, so the little missiles don't have quite the velocity to become embedded in skin.  Safety glasses are still a must, the eyes are too precious to risk injury.

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