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John already knows this; but for some of the new folks here:  Hex stock is often tool steel---BUT it doesn't have to be!  If you are getting scrap from a single supplier sometimes you can learn their marking system and *know* what you are actually getting. (OTOH if it's a mixed source very few different companies use the same marking system: eg "green" for one company may be 1020 and for another company 5160.)

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Fleamarket report: 1 ballpeen, 1 crosspeen hammer US$1 apiece, 4 soldering coppers $5, small rockbreaker digging rod $3

Yesterday I helped a fellow smith pick up a band saw from an old junk filled garage, and this is what followed me home, some letter and number punches, and some old tractor drags or something, not sur

I have a smallish spalling hammer I "converted" into a straight pein and the balance isn't good. the Face side is too heavy making it darned tiring to use. I have given thought to cutting the face sid

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These are clearly parts to something: all cut to the same length, cut edges deburred, and a transverse hole drilled at each end as if for a cotter pin. If I had to hazard a guess, I'd say they were previously the axles to the rollers in an industrial conveyor system and thus possibly in the 1045 area. That's my working hypothesis, and I'll see if testing bears it out. Science!

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Getting a bunch of stuff all cut to size sure prompts one to come up with projects suitable for that stock!

I once got 200+ pieces of 1/2" sq A36 22" long; drops from a project to bring an apartment complex up to meet the 4" ball railing code.  Sold to me for under scrap rate!    Slowly going through them making large tent stakes and S hooks with incised twists of various types.  I hate making tentstakes but with the winds we get out here I have never come home from a SCA campout with unsold ones!

The long term problem is that someday you will run out of pieces and have built up a demand for them and then have to go *buy* new stock and cut it to fit...

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On 3/20/2020 at 6:53 AM, Steven NY said:

I picked up this leg vise yesterday, I believe it is a true Indian Chief from what I have read.  I Think I have developed a bit of a problem, this is my fourth leg vise, I think I am addicted to them. 

Nice score Steven on that chief! I believe in the addiction. I have 4 also and very lucky they are all Indian Chiefs. Some call it hoarding but I found them all on CL and got them for very fair prices (100 usd for the 5 1/4 and 60 or less for the others) so I don't feel bad about getting them. 

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On 3/26/2020 at 12:26 PM, ThomasPowers said:

The long term problem is that someday you will run out of pieces and have built up a demand for them and then have to go *buy* new stock and cut it to fit...

There is a good lesson here for people that have intent to develop products and a customer base -- set your prices based on the replacement cost of your stock, rather than your cost. 

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Hex stock is often used as a "kelly bar" or a rotating drive coupler that has to have room to lengthen or shorten like a spline on a driveshaft / transmission while turning. 

Frosty The Lucky.

 

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A guy that my wife used to work with called her to say that they were cleaning out his late father's things.

They had found about a 100 pound anvil buried in the workshop and I could have it for $100 if I wanted it.

I was looking for one about that size to take out for demo and off-site classes.

It was 5 miles away and I was there in about 3 minutes.

I paid the money, packed it in the Cherokee, and got it home.

Got it out of the Jeep and took a wire brush to the ages of dirt and grease and said "xxxx xxxx".

Turns out it's a 230 pound Peter Wright with beautiful face and edges.

I'm a happy camper (but still looking for a small anvil, lol).

 

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$0.40 /lb.? I'd make a wise crack but nobody'd laugh. There's only one small rub, I don't see a picture so I'm having to suspend my disbelief pretty diligently here. Okay, I have it cornered and at bay.

SWEET SCORE!! You lucky dog.

Frosty The Lucky.

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2 hours ago, Irondragon Forge & Clay said:

Are you Irish? Seems they have all the luck.:)

Believe it or not the luck of the Irish used to denote bad luck or at least that's what my Irish relatives told me when I visited as a kid. 

Pnut

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Make some tooling for the platten.  Hold downs, clamps, and dogs should be close to the top of the list.  After that it is tooling as needed.  

Remember to keep under the table clean and tidy as it is a collection point for all manner of things, including dust bunnies, and flammable materials.

 

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Greetings Stash, 

      Gotch a fine tool there. I have had mine for years and have developed tons of tooling . I put some non combustible stuff under it on roller carts. As pictured I loaded it up because I was doing a demo on twisting . I also have made roll around equipment that pins down to the table to conserve floor space. Hossfield , Whitne angle notcher , etc. works great . Ya sure don’t move it easily. I also use steel flat belt pulleys from my line shaft shop to form large diameter stuff.  Have fun with your new table. 
 

Forge on and make beautiful things.

Jim

46020533-1749-46D9-A486-B59A5292B5F9.jpeg

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I was going to suggest making a "rake" to pull stuff that has fallen towards the middle of the table out.  I have one for pulling stuff towards the tailgate of my pickup making it easier to unload and have been surprised at both it's utility and the number of folks who have never seen one before.  (I learned about them from my Grandpa.)

I'm plumb envious; though I don't have anywhere to put such a thing save out in the yard.

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Yeah I have a list of stuff to make/improvise/find to get the best use of this tool. What is huge for me  is the large, flat and dead- level surface. I've been improvising for years, and this will make my life easier. Everything else is gravy. I  spent my last 2 days of shop time re arranging things around the new addition. The forging area stayed the same, but the rest of the area has a new and more efficient flow pattern. Thanks for the advice.

Steve

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Were you wearing a mask and brandishing a gun when you approached the seller?

Great find!  Practically a gift.  In that condition, they are selling for $100 each in my area.

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