Glenn

It followed me home

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Dear CGL,

Use your angle grinder to spark test the wagon wheel.  My experience is that wrought iron has no secondary bursts of the sparks, just straight lines.  Even mild steel has some secondary bursts.

"By hammer and hand all arts do stand."

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I'm planning to build a treadle and tire hammer in the future and have been keeping my eyes open for material I can us on the build. I noticed a large plate, with "something" welded on it behind a friends shop rusting away and asked about getting a piece of the base plate off it and he said what size you need? Called me an hour later and said it's too thick for my plasma to cut, I asked him if he had a #4 torch tip and 1/2 hr. later he called back and said that tip cut that plate like butter, come pick up your plate. 2 pieces 2ft x 4ft x1inch plate loaded in my truck for a handshake and a thank you.

Plate.jpg.423bb7c1c98d3a33285f2c323a0194db.jpg

 

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My wife was stopped at a traffic light with a bunch of cars and a speeding vehicle topped the hill, saw the line and went into a skid and hit a bunch of them and kept on going. Police  couldn't find them; but my wife did, turns out they lived 4 blocks away from us.  She went to the police again and they said they couldn't do anything as he was driving without a license, was uninsured and was unemployed...How many thousands of dollars have I wasted being licensed, registered and insured!

University on a 2 hour delay due to icy road conditions; of course I was already on University grounds when the email was sent out...They were right it was pretty slick driving in from rural areas.

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Old axel. Any one know how to take this apart without damaging it? The flange holes are about the same distance as my postvise mounting bracket. It would be a great stand/mount. Picked it up for free awhile back along with two 4” OD 1/4” thick T post that we’re old school clotheslines.

thanks y’all! 

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Spindle is very likely welded on. 

The bearing may need to be pressed/pulled off depending on if it spun. 

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Got an air mattress pump at the thrift store for $3, which should be good for the planned student JABOD forge at the college. 

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You won't be seeing much burned up steel. You have to almost be trying to burn it with those pumps. I had one just like it but a different brand in the beginning. I decided it was too much like work when it's 97f with 88% humidity. :wacko:

Pnut

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Kids need to learn the value of hard work anyway!

(I jest. They work plenty hard already.)

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Didn’t follow me home, but brought to me by a very good friend of my, - a whole bunch of titanium turbine blades of an Airbus airplane and F-16 Jet fighter. In this stage there already able to grind/cut out some decent letter opener or small daggers but I like to forge them in to more body to make a serious hunting knife or kitchen knife of it. Any suggestions about quenching, hardening, sharpening or OHSAS-issues are more than welcome.   

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Aren't a lot of those titanium on the compressor side, inconel on the turbine side? 

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Any idea what alloy of Ti they are?  That will control what heat treat is needed/can be done.  Most Ti alloys are not suitable for knives as they do not hold an edge well.  Some of the duplex(?) alloys are not good to work without an appropriate respirator.  I generally stick to CP 1&2 and not worry about heat treat or possible working issues.

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According to the source, -the blades belong to the compressor side and are more valuable than the ones at the turbine side. Thanks for H&S tips, ones I grind and cut the stuff I will wear at least a FFP3 mask. For me it’s important to keep the sharpness of the blade as long as possible.

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One nice thing about working for the college is access through our subscription to Academia.edu to things like this (now downloaded to my cloud drive):

 

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A couple of explosive charge boxes from one of the ski resorts. They use’m to set off possible Avalanches. Not sure what they will store quite yet. Maybe flowers.

Aaand... a couple of military surplus mortar cans.  One will be the new quench tank, the other maybe a time capsule.

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Dang, I've been looking for one of those cans for quenching.

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I found them on the local online for $17 a piece. I talked him down to 2 for $30. Not much of a discount but they go for $25ish on the major online shops. I also had to drive 30min to get them. Not complaining, I’ve been searching for one as well. Good luck!

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I can buy them on-line for about $25-ish as  you say, but then you've shipping to be subjected to!  UGH!

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A friend who works for the railroad stopped by with a box of goodies. The date nails are sweet!

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On February 14, 2020 at 2:20 PM, Hans Richter said:

Didn’t follow me home, but brought to me by a very good friend of my, - a whole bunch of titanium turbine blades of an Airbus airplane and F-16 Jet fighter.

http://titanium.com/wp-content/uploads/2010/08/Material-Safety-Data-Sheet.pdf

https://www.timet.com/assets/local/documents/datasheets/safety/Alloys_SDS_6-4_6-4ELI_230_3-_5_511_2014.pdf

I don't have any specific familiarity with the compressors from F-16s, and even less knowledge on whatever is in the Airbus engines, but I would expect there to be some vanadium in the compositions. Be careful. 

Also note the autoignition temperature of 2200F in air.  Titanium will also burn in CO2 and N2. Don't put water on it in an attempt to put it out if you do end up catching any on fire. Class D extinguisher or table salt are recommended. Ti is forgeable, but it is good to know what NOT to do if something goes wrong. 

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This arrived in the mail today. Benjamin is intrigued. 

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