Glenn

It followed me home

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Followed me to work technically. A bday gift from my sister with another pair on their way from another sister. 

They are Caliburn small vbit bolt tongs. 

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On 10/13/2019 at 5:08 AM, pnut said:

. I used to have a friend who had a prop business in North Hollywood. I never knew what I might see when I'd stop by. It was one of my favorite places to visit. I sold quite a bit to him also. Good find. Any time a prop business is selling it's inventory it's worth a look.

It was a crazy place to wander around, here are some pics of the inside.  That same day I went to the sawmill and bought some nice pieces of hardwood (two maple legs, a maple stretcher, and a russian olive top) to make a side table for my bed.  I'll have to think about forging some hardware for it. 

 

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Found this by my barn today. I was looking through some rocks for a piece of flint. Looks like some clinkers and some coke or almost coke coal. The house is old enough that there was most likely a forge in the barn for what ever reason. 

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Or it was a good place to dump the ash and clinker from the coal furnace in the house.

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Followed me home from the festival demo today. I couldn’t pass up the price, especially considering the condition.

 

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I was very pleased! Same blower that I was using for the demo, but much more smooth and quiet. Pan and fire pot are in great shape, just some work to do on the kinked breaker, the assembly. I’ll probably have to make a frame with casters to make it more mobile. (I have to move it out of the garage to forge and with a 3/8” cast pan, this thing is heavy!)

David

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Couple of history books from the college library:

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Which "Irons in the Fire" is that? There is one on down hearth cooking and another on cowboy stuff with that title, (IIRC I have both). I believe there is actually a third book with the same title as well.

"Bond of Iron" is a bit dry, I wonder if it was derived from a thesis?  It's about an iron smelting business in VA between the Revolutionary War and the Civil War. (Got that one too.) Not much about the technology; more about the social/economic aspects. Like they used to rent slaves from their owners to work there; preferred them to the Irish as they didn't show up for work drunk...

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1200# of what i think TSC would call nut coal. KY bituminous. Now just to get it unloaded. 

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Irondragon,

Should I really clay the fire pot? On all of the solid fuel forged I have used (at demos or othe IBA members forges) that have manufactured/cast fire pots have not been clayed. The only warning I have ever received was not water into the pot when shutting everything down.

David

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33 minutes ago, ThomasPowers said:

Which "Irons in the Fire" is that? There is one on down hearth cooking and another on cowboy stuff with that title, (IIRC I have both). I believe there is actually a third book with the same title as well.

This is similar to “Bond of Iron”: a social and economic history of an iron-smelting and plantation-owning family in colonial and  pre-Civil War Virginia. 

25 minutes ago, BillyBones said:

1200# of what i think TSC would call nut coal. KY bituminous. Now just to get it unloaded. 

TSC nut coal is anthracite, not bituminous. “Nut coal” proper is simply a measurement of size, where the lumps can fit through a screen with openings no bigger than 1-5/8" x 13/16". 

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OK then that is the third book with the same name.

I got BB's joke and wish I could get some of that coal! We've been using the Sewell Seam stuff I'm accrued over the years and I've gotten spoiled all over again. At a demo once Frank Turley showed up with a couple of lumps of coal that size and borrowed my forge and was forge welding in the fire they made. Of course as they heated up they tended to subdivide.

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IFC, sorry! Misread your post twice. (Sometime my brain just sees the words it wants to!)

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In the “it followed me away from home” department, I gave away this little drill press to the theater department at the college. It’s better suited to their needs, and a small way of showing my gratitude for the big drill press they gave me and for letting me use the welder.

 

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This showed up at my work last week thanks to a very thoughtful member here who decided to give me a deal I couldn't have hoped to find locally. Now to clean it up and put it to work. IMG_20191024_033751.thumb.jpg.477c44e9caccd01429035be4a053ff1b.jpg

Pnut

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334 pages, Historical Fiction, but seems to follow closely the story of an actual German immigrant who made his way as a youth to the Cleveland, Ohio area  in the mid 1800's to apprentice as a blacksmith in a wagon-building business. Well written and enjoyable read, but the most interesting thing to me was the apparent accuracy of the terminology. The writer (a lady) had a solid handle on the language of blacksmithing during the period, especially where wagon-building and working with wrought iron was concerned. A novel, not a technical treatise, but enough iron-pounding involved to be interesting.

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So there i was sitting outside when my mom and dad show up. My mom comes over and says to me that my aunt (her sister) found something that she wanted to give me. My grandfathers knife he carried when stationed in England. It is a WW2 issue British SAS dagger. My grandfather was in the Air corps, later to become the Air force. Anyway here it is. A beautiful specimen of history in my opinion. 

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Any knife guys with some advice on how to clean up the blade would be appreciated.

And yall W. Virginia guys may recognize Doddridge, Doddridge county is named after my moms family. Something to do with one of my ancestor working to make it a state. 

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Your knife is a classic "Fairbairn-Sykes" commando dagger used by British special forces during World War Two and beyond. I believe S.A.S. still use them today.

SLAG.

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