Glenn

It followed me home

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Oooh! MUCH better than getting bills! A happy visit to the mailbox John, congratulations.

Frosty The Lucky.

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I bought a cheese grater at the scrapyard yesterday.  Well that's what I called it. It's a 3/8" thick steel target with a large number of through and through holes in it leaving both a "splash rim" on the front and the punch out rim on the back.  What surprised me was that the holes were fairly small. It's hanging on the wall of the shop; a student of mine suggested adding a sign "Tool Thieves will be considered new targets"

Also a 4# sledge head, may have been through a fire; but as I was planning to forge it anyway...

US20 cents a pound.

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2 hours ago, ThomasPowers said:

"Tool Thieves will be considered new targets"

That's a good one. Deb came up with one a few weeks ago in reaction to our new, uber predator drive, dachshund, "Rhonda". The new doxy motto is, "If I care enough to chase you, I care enough to kill and eat you." ;)

Frosty The Lucky.

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Down here we have to watch out for the Chihuahuas; luckily a good set of snake leggings will work against them.

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16 hours ago, Mr Moose said:

Frosty, I think I am going to steal that one. LOL:D

Sorry you can't steal it, we offer it for free use. Deb will be happy about other folk liking it enough to use it. It was one of those spontaneous things we're wondering about having a stack of signs made for sale. When Deb said it in reaction to how unrelenting Rhonda was when she caught scent of a rabbit we both just stopped, looked at each other for a bit.

Frosty The Lucky.

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1 hour ago, Chris The Curious said:

Wow, those both look like really interesting books.

I've read the McNaughton book before, and it is quite fascinating. There's a lot of really interesting stuff in there both about smithing in particular, but also about the role of the blacksmith within the traditional Mande society, culture, and religion.

The "Colonial Ironwork" is chock-a-block full of photographs and measured drawings, many of them from buildings near where I used to live as a kid (maybe that was an early influence on my becoming a smith? Hmmm....). It's a reprint of a book first published in 1930, so some of those old buildings don't exist any more. In my old neighborhood, lots of them were torn down for "urban renewal" projects in the sixties and seventies and replaced with modern townhouses. (Some of which have interesting modern ironwork of their own; see Dona Z. Meilach's Decorative and Sculptural Ironwork.)

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Not smithing related but today I had two Structural Concepts Encore series refrigerated display cases given to me, and I bought a US Range commercial stove griddle grill oven combo for $40.

They said the cases didn't work, so I will take a look at them - they don't have any mechanically inclined folks at this thrift store, and it may be a simple fix. Even if they don't I can still use them. They use 404a refrigerant, so I should be able to get them running unless the compressor is toast, then it will be a budget check. These are the first cases that I have seen where the one piece curved front glass opens up.

The stove will get converted to propane as there is no natural gas in my valley. The top has around a 36" griddle, and 4 burners on the right with the oven below those. I found grilling inserts in the lower left opening, so I may make it a griddle , grill combo and use the pot plates on another US Range double oven I have that is mostly hot top, and only two pot stations.

I would like to open a small place out where I live, and that is why I am jumping on equipment as it comes up. 

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6 hours ago, JHCC said:

The "Colonial Ironwork" is chock-a-block full of photographs and measured drawings

A sample:

DA7F742A-395D-47E3-B301-621A67C37F6E.jpeg

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To add to the summer reading list, here are a couple I received recently from Abe's online used book store for about $3 each... Catching the Fire tells of Philip Simmons, a famous blacksmith in the Charleston, SC area. In addition, Simmons was the first well known black blacksmith in that area, and he created hundreds of the historically significant artisan wrought iron works extant in that area. Some of his work is in the Smithsonian. In addition to original artistic work, Simmons rescued many of the original old wrought iron works done by very early smiths in the Charleston area. Until he came along, the wrought iron craft was dying out in the area, and many of the beautiful wrought iron gates and such were in seriously deteriorated condition for lack of smiths who knew how to repair and maintain them. Includes some photos, but it's mostly the story of Simmon's early life and how he got started as a total newbie/apprentice.

The other book was (to me) the most interesting. The Craft of the Blacksmith is a fairly detailed overview of the blacksmith's craft and traditional tools, along with a detailed record of the restoration of an original English smithy, Llawr-y-glyn, a Montgomeryshire smithy from the 1860's. The Llawr-y-glyn has been carefully restored and is now part of the "living history" portion of the Welsh Folk Museum, which is likely operated in a similar fashion to Virginia's Colonial Williamsburg. Many old photos, copies of business records and payment receipts, etc. Photos of some tools I had not seen in use, such as wheel iron bending and installation tools, etc. Intensely interesting reading to a newbie like me, especially since the wife and I visited England earlier this year, although I'm sorry to say we did not visit Llawr-y-glyn.

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Craft of the Blacksmith had caught my eye, but I wasn't sure if I wanted it or not. Based on your description, I've ordered a copy; thanks.

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Stopped by my steel supplier to check out the drop bin; grabbed a few chunks of 1/2” x 1-1/2” bar, just right for heavy-duty tongs. 

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There was LOTS of really cool stuff today. I could easily have dropped several hundred bucks without blinking. 

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The last component I've been searching for to call my shop some sort of "base level" complete was a real leg vise. I've been searching for a while but now I have it.

16.5 kg (36 pounds) and 80 cm long (31 inches). I will clean it some, coat it in BLO and then build a stand.

Also some chisels and punches that I will repurpose.

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Congratulations.  Good feeling to have an "official" blacksmith's vise, for sure.  I don't consider myself a "real" blacksmith yet, but I'll sure feel as if I'm on my way when I get a decent sized anvil and get my forge up and running.  Happy for you.

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SmedjaSlitvarg, interesting vise mount. Does it allow for the vise to be swiveled perpendicular to the workbench?

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19 hours ago, Chris The Curious said:

Congratulations.  Good feeling to have an "official" blacksmith's vise, for sure.  I don't consider myself a "real" blacksmith yet, but I'll sure feel as if I'm on my way when I get a decent sized anvil and get my forge up and running.  Happy for you.

Thanks! I don't really call myself a blacksmith yet either. I'm someone learning to be a blacksmith :) 

28 minutes ago, BIGGUNDOCTOR said:

SmedjaSlitvarg, interesting vise mount. Does it allow for the vise to be swiveled perpendicular to the workbench?

I didn't think of that, but you are right. The bolt in the back that locks it only has one position, but it should possible to release it and turn it.

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Got 2 of these today. I know it is anthracite and not ideal, but that is what i mostly use becuase that is what is available locally. Mostly though the price was right. $6 for 2, 40# bags. Cant beat that with a stick.

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Nope you sure can't. Personally I like anthracite for everything but welding maybe. I have been trying to get the local TSC to carry it again without much luck. In the last few years every retailer within an hour or so drive has quit stocking it due to lack of demand so it's charcoal or corn for me.

Pnut

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Billy, if you can take a field trip to southwestern Pa, with a pickup truck or something to haul, I can get you loaded up with some good bituminous coal this fall. (He's only open fall through spring.) 

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This little beauty jumped in my truck this afternoon. 

Threads are in great condition (to my eye), screw box is looking okay. A little bent. Jaws are good. Everything came apart with no issues (except the thrust washer on the screw box, the slot has been shrunken/bent, but the washer moves freely). 

Overall very pleased and excited to start cleaning with the wire wheel. 

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Cheers, 

Zach

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