Glenn

It followed me home

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Also, a not so fruitful garage sale haul, I ended up with a couple of pieces of bar/round stock. One 5/8” x 7’ and one 1” x 66”. Wouldn’t be so bad but they are SS and also mystery steel. Give me some ideas on what they might be used for.

Hawk

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2 hours ago, picker77 said:

Good haul from the FM! Cut the tines off that pick, future tools there for sure!

Thanks Picker.  Looks to me like those tines will make good drifting tools for hammer heads.  I've plenty of jack hammer bits for a lifetime of punches.

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1 hour ago, hawk18 said:

Also, a not so fruitful garage sale haul, I ended up with a couple of pieces of bar/round stock. One 5/8” x 7’ and one 1” x 66”. Wouldn’t be so bad but they are SS and also mystery steel. Give me some ideas on what they might be used for.

Hawk

I'd make punches out of the 5/8, and drifts out of the 1"..............of course that's dependent on what kind of steel they are.  Cut a 6" piece off each and run some tests.  Start with quenching in air, then oil and then water.  Check'em with a file to see which one "skates" the file and you should be good to go. (or at least that's what they tell me.)

(Just listen to me.................I actually sound as if I know what I'm talking about!) :lol::D:wacko:

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But THAT isn't a pickAXE Chris, it's a PICK, and the most common use for one is breaking up hard soil to make it easier to dig. A pickAXE had a pick(spike) on one end and an AXE on the other and are popular for demolition or clearing stumps and such. A Mattock has an Adze end and either an axe or pick on the other. A pick mattock is most often used for digging or loosening soil, the spike breaks hard soils and the adze end is used to pry up rocks and move soil.  An axe Mattock is another good demolition tool but is favored for rooting and often has the axe offset to one side for close work. 

Yeah, I know the difference between a pick and a pick axe but had to exercise a little YohooFu because I know Mattocks are a lot more complicated. 

Other good use for pick heads is as medium high carbon stock for: impact, pry, clamp, etc. tools. 

If they're cheap enough they're on my "to buy" list garage, yard, etc. saling.

Frosty The Lucky.

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Of course you are right, Frosty.  I know better........just wasn't thinking.

$3 for the Pick.  I figured that was pretty good when the price tag said $15.  :D

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5 hours ago, JHCC said:

I’m out right now, but I’ll try to remember to post a photo when I get home. 

As promised:

3B3E25DE-AA06-4508-8A2A-47247E8F0EDA.jpeg

(With two hammers I used it on.)

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Sorry Chris, sometimes my brain just sticks on terminology. Decent price.

Frosty The Lucky.

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JHCC, thanks. I don't know why I read drift and pictured a handled punch, but it got me thinking about making a handled punch.

Pnut

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I just picked up two pickaxes at a barn sale. I might try that with one of them. 

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I tried explaining to my co workers one day the difference in a pick ax and a mattock just could not get it to sink into them. 

All the mattocks i have ever used the ax side, the blade was usually only about 2" wide and was more of a wedge than a cutting edge. 

My cousin one day had to dig a small trench from his house to the barn he chose a mattock to do the job. His dad came out and the boy was sweating and wore out. My uncle looks at the mattock and the adze end was bent into a nice scroll. Oh i may mention my cousin is about 6'5" 325#. He is in college right now on a wrestling scholarship, Iowa state i think. 

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3 hours ago, BillyBones said:

I tried explaining to my co workers one day the difference in a pick ax and a mattock just could not get it to sink into them.

I've had dogs that were easier to explain things to than some of my old coworkers. They'd just look at me like I was crazy when I took a draw file to a spade or shovel blade. THEN say I was LUCKY my spade or shovel worked better and easier. Same guys who made fun of me for reading rather than knocking down a half rack of beer after work would state with confidence I was lucky I know so much. 

Unfortunately I can get to rambling about details like this and irritate folk. Then again I enjoy irritating SOME, I'm evil like that.

Frosty The Lucky.

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Okay, I put the monster (to me) spring in the fire pit today after church.  It is now completely covered in hot coals.  I'll just leave it until Wednesday.  Ought to be cooled by then.  I caught a glimpse of it when I was putting the last batch of wood on it and it looked red to me.  Didn't try putting a magnet on it, but I'm sure it's hot. 

Do I need to do the same thing to the pick?  Didn't think of it until just now.  Could have done both at the same time. :wacko::rolleyes:

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You should be golden Chris.

Frosty The Lucky.

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Depends on what you want to do with it. When I made my drift, I just cut it off with the angle grinder. If you plan to cut it with a hacksaw, bonfire-annealing it first wouldn't be the worst thing (unless it's air-hardening, of course).

Getting back to William Blake for a moment, I remembered this morning an outgoing message my brother used to have on his answering machine, inspired by Blake's "The Tyger" (with a nod to Robert Frost):

Telephone, telephone, ringing bright,
In Bill's apartment, up three flights.
Which of William's hands or ears
Could still thy fearful cacophony?

In what distant deep or hall,
Lurks the maker of this call?
What impels him (or her) to call Bill,
And get no answer, ringing still?

Yet if some strange and subtle art,
Should frame a message in thy heart,
Leave it when you hear the beep,
And I'll call back before I sleep.
And I'll call back before I sleep.

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Well an anvil almost followed me home a couple days ago. It was a 100lb peter wright in very good condition for 60$ on craigslist. Unfortunately, someone beat me to it, and then less than a day later it appeared back on craigslist from its new "owner" for $375. :(

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1 hour ago, Chelonian said:

Well an anvil almost followed me home a couple days ago. It was a 100lb peter wright in very good condition for 60$ on craigslist. Unfortunately, someone beat me to it, and then less than a day later it appeared back on craigslist from its new "owner" for $375. :(

That kind of stuff makes me madder than all get-out!  Profit seekers getting the great deal when some aspiring blacksmith searching for an anvil that may last his lifetime is left in the dust.  Can't really fault a guy looking for a profit, but dang!!!!!  Just isn't fair,  in my mind.

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What are you going to do with it? I've never used a pick for stock so I'd have to know what I wanted to try and experiment. Picks are tough and impact resistant so you know they're not likely to shatter as they come from the maker. Doing your own heat treat might cause it to become brittle but determining that is the reason for the mystery metal evaluation process; "Junkyard rules."

I'm thinking they'd be good candidates for my garage/yard/etc. sale short list, like: crow, pinch, spud, speed, etc bars are now. 

Frosty The Lucky.

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No. I'd put it on the stock shelf, I have a number of various pry, spud, etc. bars in my "high" carbon stock and have used a couple speed and one small wrecking bar with satisfactory results. I may have a couple pick heads in the moderately high carbon bucket, I'd have to look. 

Picks are good stock, even relatively known material but like ANY time you repurpose something you need to be more careful than if you'd purchased new stock and knew exactly what you were getting.

Frosty The Lucky.

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A very experienced smith (over 50 yrs. exp.) of my acquaintance has done a LOT of restoring of pick (axes, mattox, etc.) for folks.  He usually hardens in water, then tempers to blue/purple on the end 1 to 2 inches on the point.  I don't know how he heat treats the other (bladed) ends, but I would imagine much the same.

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In the "Didn't follow me home" category, my local industrial surplus place listed a 6 ton fly press for $299 first thing this morning, and it sold before I could line up the funds to put a hold on it. Grrrrr....

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