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I Forge Iron

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Fleamarket report: 1 ballpeen, 1 crosspeen hammer US$1 apiece, 4 soldering coppers $5, small rockbreaker digging rod $3

Yesterday I helped a fellow smith pick up a band saw from an old junk filled garage, and this is what followed me home, some letter and number punches, and some old tractor drags or something, not sur

I have a smallish spalling hammer I "converted" into a straight pein and the balance isn't good. the Face side is too heavy making it darned tiring to use. I have given thought to cutting the face sid

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Das, before you cut the bottle up, be sure that they will not fill it.  The local gas supplier here will fill the smaller customer owned bottles without question, actually they just swap them out and they are not noted for doing anything that might benefit a customer.  I have bought some of the smaller bottles at yard sales and had them filled without issue.  Nice to have a backup on Saturday or Sunday and your large leased bottle runs empty.  They are the kind of place that charges $58.00 for an 11 pound spool of MIG wire (online price $31 with free shipping or $34 at Tractor Supply) but are close enough that I use them for gases.

If you were closer, I would give you a an old bottle to make a bell out of - I have several that I picked up off the roadside after I kept seeing them there for several years.

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Gazz, it's a bit late for this one.  :ph34r: I'll keep it in mind if I find more. At the moment I have two larger argon/co2 bottles and one for straight argon. 

So right now I just need to make a clapper for the now cut bottle. 

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My buddy works at a Sawmill. He brought me these gang and bull edger blades today. From my brief research, it seems that most of these are made of 1075 or d2? Does anyone here have any experience with such blades? At least a 1/4 thick. 

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A successful trip to the industrial surplus warehouse on my way back from the airport: a nice little Craftsman horizontal bandsaw. 

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Which just happens to fit nicely on the stand I got last time I was there:

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Couple little issues, but nothing deadly. Not bad for $63.

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These are axles from an 18 wheeler trailer landing gear. Solid and 1-7/8” diameter ,16-1/2” long and 13# each. Now the idea was for making hammers. Since they were axles I would think med carbon. Anyone have input?

 

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Nice bandsaw John. Even better you had a base that fits it. :)

Killbox, I'd say cut a piece and sparktest them. As with any mystery steel you have to run through the tests.  If no good for blade steel the saw blades would be useful for art or other purposes. 

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One of my cousins gave me my grandfather's branding irons, a shoe and his nippers that came out of his blacksmith shop when it was torn down. He was a blacksmith, wheel right and farrier and made the branding iron and shoe, between late 1800 and mid 1900, using some of the equipment I am using now, He still had 40 head of cattle and one milk cow at 86 yrs. of age, but wasn't branding them anymore.

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I was once given a bunch of very large bandsaw blades with carbide teeth and found that the material used to carry the carbide teeth was 4140 - something a bit better tougher than mild steel but not really usable for knife making.  I made some large saw frames out of rebar and cut and drilled the pieces of bandsaw blade to fit.  I gave them to potters that I know as they made great soft firebrick saws.  I should make one for myself someday as it would be useful for the gas forge maintenance.  I would guess the large circular saw blades would also be some sort of medium carbon alloy so that they would maintain stiffness better.

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Whenever I was about 14 I used the bottom of a Singer sewing machine for a treadle powered scrollsaw. I had the top part of the saw but the treadle, and table were missing. I used it for a school project about the industrial revolution. They come in handy for all kinds of tools if you don't want or have electricity like wood lathes rip saws etc etc

Pnut

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