Glenn

It followed me home

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A profitable excursion to Sale Saturday at the industrial surplus warehouse: a nice face shield for the grinder, some kind of steel stand, a hefty steel toolbox, a box of Kevlar sleeves (some of which will soon be appearing on the Tailgating page), and a hydraulic pump assembly (2hp motor, an as-yet-to-be-determined-displacement pump, an accumulator, and some tubes and hoses, all mounded on a nice steel plate), all for VERY cheap. 

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I had a pair of sleeves very similar. They did not work well with welding or grinding. They are mainly for mechanical(reaching into engine compartments and similar to protect from cuts, scrapes and coming in contact briefly with hot parts) use. 

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51 minutes ago, Daswulf said:

protect from cuts, scrapes and coming in contact briefly with hot parts)

Exactly what I need, all I have to do is look at something sharp & I wind up bruised or bleeding. A side effect of chemo and getting older. I've been using archers sleeves which help but Kevlar is so much better.

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My very first encounter with Kevlar was from meeting a glassblower who liked to wear such a sleeve on his left arm, to keep him protected from the heat of the furnace.

Update: These are double-thickness, 24" long, with a hole for your thumb. Haven't tried it yet, but I imagine they'd be pretty good for wearing on your off hand when punching hot metal.

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I wouldn't doubt they would be useful for that John. 

IronDragon, they Would also be good for yardwork if you were clearing brush or whatnot. They are good and useful to have for the right uses.

Just a note on why I mention not good for grinding, the grindings will collect in the material and eventually they feel like you are wearing frayed fiberglass arm sleeves. Not comfortable! :wacko: They make the leather armsleves/upper cape that work well for that.

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Good haul, JHCC. Went to the scrapyard today. Wasn't much there. Looks like they have hauled a lot off. Found a few bits and pieces. Including and interesting fire poker. It's forged, but the protruding part ( don't know what that's called) is welded on, not forge welded. US $3.00

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Interesting that they had RR spikes -- lots of scrapyards won't take them, for fear they'd been stolen from the line. When steel scrap prices were real high a few years back, someone near here removed half a mile or so of disused track, tried to sell it to a local yard, and ended up paying a seven-figure fine. The scrapyard where I take stuff (which won't let me pick through the piles for liability reasons) is very clear they won't touch RR steel.

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I was kind of surprised to see the spikes.  There were more, but I only grabbed a handful. I have a bunch already. There's a town about 15 miles west of us in which there is a railroad depot in the middle of it. There are two scrapyards right on the side of the tracks. They have literally piles of spikes, track, and track plate. And who knows what other RR related metal. I'm guessing that they have some kind of contract with the railroad, being there's so much of it available. The yard I went to today, you can scrounge through whatever you want. That's wear I found my little Vulcan. The other yard down the road, you have to wear a hard hat, but you can freely pick through stuff. 

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Your lucky. The three yards near me all have single buyer contracts. It all gets shipped to China. 

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Seems to be the theme lately with scrapyards. I still have a couple I haven't tried yet. When I get a free day I'll inquire and take them some "gifts" to possibly get an in. 

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Three or four years ago, the yard closest to us closed to the public. Then not long after, they shut down completely 

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Hello all,

My wife and I spent the day with one of our friends who is getting ready to move and is liquidating most of his life times work of a collection. He has tons of things on his property and is a great fabricated/builder. He took so little money I kind of felt bad. Felt like I should of had a mask and gun. 

He has some line shaft setups if anyone would be interested. He is a great guy and I would like to see him do well as he prepares to move.

Here are a few pics of the stuff I came away with, as he digs deeper I hope to go back.

Have a great day,

W

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Even including the kitchen sink! Nice haul Steven. 

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Picked this up at an estate sale this weekend.  It works, mostly; needs to be stripped down and some gunk cleaned out.

 

 

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Chris, nice that it has the vise on it, those go missing most of the time. I have that same saw (sans vise of course) and that wagon.

 

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It was buried in the back of the barn; the barn being open was the only reason I stopped.  I've not seen one before, but it looked cool.  Didn't work the first time we plugged it in, but I fiddled with some connections and it jerked a bit.  The lady had no idea what she wanted for anything, everything was make an offer, so I offered her $50.  Neither of us knew if that was a good deal or not.  A fellow who was there helping her said, "Well it's a specialty item, only someone who works with metal is going to want it, I offered you 50 for it last week if it didn't sell".  No idea if he was doing me a favor or soaking me, but it looks cool and I'm looking forward to adding it to my list of "shop projects". 

Michael, I haven't researched it yet, but I'm assuming I can get (or easily modify) standard hacksaw blades for it?

 

 

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Yeah, it may take a little looking but reciprocating (sometimes powered hack saw) blades are still made. These have some advantages over band saws.

Frosty The Lucky.

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3 hours ago, Chris Comtois said:

Here's the link to a manual for these machines. they were made under a couple of different labels, I think the one I have is a Craftsman.

 They do take regular 12 inch hacksaw blades but they wear pretty fast in a power hacksaw. If you can get the slightly thicker Power Hacksaw Blades (one of my bookbinding buddies uses the used ones for knives) they will last longer, but the 14 inch blades seem to be more common than 12's. Great tool! very easy to set it and forget it but also easy to get mesmerized by the slow, back and forth as it cuts.

3 hours ago, Chris Comtois said:

 

Michael, I haven't researched it yet, but I'm assuming I can get (or easily modify) standard hacksaw blades for it?

 

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I’ve had a couple of the power hacksaws. Like has been said, they are mesmerizing to watch saw! I always used bimetal bandsaw blades that I got free from the machine shop. They always had some which had bad areas or broken. I cut them to the length I needed and drilled holes in them. They were tough but drillable. My biggest problem was finding one fine enough to saw thin wall tubing but, hey they were free!

hope this helps! Bill D. 

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Garage sale near home showed up on Craigslist. Picked up the old sledge hammer head and a Dayton electric forge blower, both for $10.

Had to drive the broken handle stub out of the eye, which looks like it was punched by hand. I'm guessing 6 or 7 lbs, but haven't put it on the scale yet, need to clean it up, grind out the chips in the peen  and handle it. Very compact and I really like the round notches style of these old hammer heads (I find a lot of them in garages, the narrow spaces between the garage door and the wall always seems to have a sledge or two in there)

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Another great day at the scrap yard!  Three Jorgensen "pony" pipe clamps, a Stanley drill press vise, a large galvanized turnbuckle (I have no idea what I'll ever do with it),  a pick head, a large mill bastard smooth cut file that is still sharp, bunch of small stuff like screwdrivers, surform tools etc. and the big prize, a CM lodestar 1/2 ton electric chain hoist with the trolley!  The power cable had been cut so there was doubt as to whether it would work or not but I figured the trolley and the chain and hook were worth something to me so I took the chance.  Later in the evening, I wired up a power cord to it and plugged it in (110-120VAC) and what do know, it works!  Now I really have to hang the I-beam from the rafters in the shop.  A great haul for $30! 

I drove by there yesterday and had to avert my eyes and keep driving otherwise my shop will be seriously choked with good stuff.

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