Glenn

It followed me home

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That mouse might look good on a shelf in a museum.  My only picks this weekend were 30# of hardwood charcoal and a dual action mattress pump.  Both from Mr. Walton's market.  and a box of screws from the big blue home improvement store.  Just gotta put that box of dirt together now. 

Didn't find any roadkill.  Wife's getting pretty pointed when I bring it home anyway.  Long story about that.  I might share it some day, but not today.

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Early Father's Day present from my local big orange box's tool rental counter. Was with the boys teaching my 7 year old what different tools were. Asked if he had any busted ones. Turns out they had just tossed them. After explaining why I was looking he found this partially used one and gave it to me. 

Hot cut hardy and several other tools here I come.

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From wikipedia: Gangbox (also gang box) is a colloquial term utilized in the construction industry, referring to a toolbox or workbox that can be accessed by multiple workers. 

From me: usually sturdily built with provisions for lifting by crane or forklift and lockable to keep tools safe overnight/weekends.

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2 hours ago, MrTMichaud said:

My only picks this weekend were 30# of hardwood charcoal and a dual action mattress pump Both from Mr. Walton's market. 

Did you get the pump with the hose on the handle or on the bottom. If you got the one with the hose on the handle it's okay for smaller stock but might be a struggle to get up to welding temps with anything larger than 3/8 or 1/2 inch. I have the one with the hose at the top.

Pnut

 

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I didnt even think of hammers. May try a dog head hammer. Was gonna use the tapered end to make a hammer eye drift. But even with that and the hot cut there's a lot of steel left. I didnt realize they were as large as they are. :D

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Naw, that Williams wrench is a great wrench to use. The one I have is a lot tighter than the new ones. Very well made.

 

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My favorite hammer eye drift is just one side of an old pickaxe, cut off right next to the eye and straightened. Perfect taper, perfect cross section.

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Good to know. I have a pickax head in my misc steel from around the property pile. :)

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33 minutes ago, MrTMichaud said:

I believe it has the hose at the bottom.  Haven't dug it out of the box yet...

That's the larger one. The store by me doesn't stock that one.

Pnut

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Some of the recents.

solid metal casters, 3/4” threaded rod, some kind of axel/shaft, and a heavy duty tripod of some sort.

all from the metal bin in park city Utah 

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Well, I'm totally cross-eyed!  I just finished going through 375 pages of pictures....................didn't read all the posts, but poured over the pictures.  Only thing I can say is I'm sick and tired of all those beautiful anvils jumpin' up in the back of your pickups and followin' you home!  Sure never happened to me!  But thanks.............all the pictures were fun to see.

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Wasn't sure as to put this here or at the pets page. 

The mouse may not be in a museum, but he now occupies a spot on a shelf in the shop. 

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Aus, i forgot to say no, my dad did some construction work but not much. He is retired Army. Most of that stuff was most likely my grandpa's. He was a construction worker. Kind of a jack of all trades. He could build cabinets, as well as he could lay a foundation. Could roof a house as well as build the walls. He was the first person i ever seen smithing. He was not a black smith but if it needed fixed he could fire up the forge in the barn and do it. He could lay brick and pour concrete. He fought a Sherman in WWII ( the reason i served on an Abrams) and could shoot the eyes out of a rattle snake at 100 yrds in a sand storm. He could grow crops and raise live stock. He taught me so much, when he was not dropping hammers on me. (3 times, once from the hay loft)  My grandpa was just an old KY hillbilly that grew up in the 20's-30's when you had to do for yourself and he taught a lot of that to me. He taught me how to shoot, how to hunt, pound a nail, sharpen a knife, skin a rabbit, melt lead into shot, plow a field, cut tobacco, plant a tree, wire a socket, level a board, etc., etc. 

If ya cant tell, my grandpa was my hero. 

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45 minutes ago, BillyBones said:

If ya cant tell, my grandpa was my hero.

Yeah, we can tell. I wish I'd been able to spend time with my Grandfathers. My paternal Grandfather, John Frost died in the flu pandemic that ended WWI within a year of coming home from the war, a couple months before Dad was born. My maternal Grandfather Guy Beede was a federal circuit court judge, I remember sitting in his lap. He tweaked my CHEEK!:o 

I learned a little about them but nothing from them, except I didn't like my cheek tweaked.

I grew up in S. Cal which was booming new industry so I learned modern trades rather than some of the old by eye and hand ones. Dad wasn't pleased I was interested in blacksmithing at all, he and Mother always said I should learn a paying trade instead. I didn't want to do it for a living I just like playing with fire and hitting things with hammers.

I found out years later, right after picking up my 50# LG that during the Depression Dad had a job paying something like $1.25 a week sharpening plow shears on a 50# LG. He wasn't big enough to hold a real job so he worked for a blacksmith sharpening plow shears. Explained why he was so dead set against blacksmithing. My Uncle Fred is who told me about Dad and the smithy, when I showed him my LG he laughed out loud and told me Dad would've had a canniption just looking at the pic.

Sponge learning where you find it.

Frosty The Lucky.

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I grew up on a farm where the whole family lived. We got indoor plumbing in 78'. Until then it was an out house and a wash tub. But we all had to pitch in to help. Whether it was throwing hay in the loft, sloppin the hogs, picking beans or what not. I was taught at an early age how to make due. May dad retired from the Army, but he also did a lot of construction. He is better at things like building roads and bridges though. The most important thing my granddad taught me though was do not give up, there is no cant do it. 

That was my dads side. My moms side my granddad died 2 years before i was born. He was a colonel in the Air Force, my grandmother died when i was 4, she was a piano teacher. They were kind of lower upperclass types that were world traveled, imagine my moms shock when my dad came home from Vietnam and we moved down in the sticks from DC. 

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39 minutes ago, BillyBones said:

down in the sticks from DC. 

I can't imagine her dismay! I don't know if I could stop anywhere downhill from DC with the kind of . . . stuff that flows out of there!

Ewwww!

Frosty The Lucky.

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The tripod head looks like one used to lower equipment and personnel down into areas. Or possibly stage rigging.

I was also going to say steering shaft.

 Re-shoot the all thread with an F22 aperture and look at the difference in how they come out..

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The higher the f  stop/ aperature the greater the depth of field. More of the picture will be in focus from fore to background. The shorter the lens the more distortion around the edges though. Too short and you get walleye vision like looking through a peephole on a door.

Pnut

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13 hours ago, pnut said:

vision like looking through a peephole on a door

Stopping your lens down means you see process servers and bill collectors when you look through it?! :o

 :rolleyes:

Frosty The Lucky.

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I guess it depends on what kind of mischief you've been up to.

Pnut

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