Glenn

It followed me home

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I have a couple of hours work with my chainsaw and the three bars and the saw blade are coming home with me.

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“Inherited” a couple of cross cut saws. One is 49” and the other is 55”.

What do you do with those?

....:..besides cut trees. 

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Cut trees? :unsure: 

They're usually in the medium C range and make good kitchen knife stock as is. I have one and for years have wanted to use it in a pattern welded billet. I don't make blades though. 

Frosty The Lucky.

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Well, I got married due to one; it's stored in the house behind the study door now.  The scrapped ones I use for layers between BSB in billets.

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Gentleman said he got it new in 1980 and didnt use it much. Looks like I can still see cosmoline on it. 

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It’s better than most new drills.  That is a serious score.

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Boy. That blows my little craftsman out the water. Total drill press envy

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Thanks again!! All I can say is wow!

I have never owned (or used a drill press before) and I drilled a 1/4” hole in a RR spike in about 15 seconds with pretty much the weight of my hand on the handle. 

Wheres this been all my life :-)

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That's how I felt when I got my 2x90 belt grinder. It's a wonderful feeling!

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I know right. I just cant believe there isnt at least one xxxxxx  mark on the table since Jimmy Carter was POTUS

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I've been using my close out tools drill press since the mid 70s and there isn't a drill mark in anything that isn't supposed to have one. Pay close attention to what's below the work that the drill bit is going to contact when it passes through. My drill vise doesn't have drill marks in it either. It does have marks from rotary files on the edges of the jaws.

There's another important rule for you. Do NOT put side pressure on the quill! The quill is what the drill chuck is attached to and turns the bit, they are NOT made with thrust bearings, side pressure will wear the bearings out surprisingly quickly. A drill press is NOT a mill, don't use it as one. 

I realize I was just talking about applying side pressure to my drill quill but it was VERY light running a rotary file on a thin, 3/16" bronze guard for the Seax I got from Theo.

Frosty The Lucky.

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Wow! Nice score Pedro!

Stopped by an auction today and saw a guy carrying out his pallet full of goodies. Asked if he’d sell me the oil rag can. He looked at me like I was crazy and said to give him $10 and a hand. I gladly obliged. Stopped by my local body shop and picked up an empty laquer thinner can. Cut the top off and presto, a 10 gal. quench tank with a lid. Now to decide what to fill it with. 

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10 hours ago, Rojo Pedro said:

Thanks for the tip Frosty. 

Im going to search for more drill press knowledge tips and mods

You're welcome, my pleasure. Here's a rule of thumb for rotation speed. Better too slow than too fast. 

Here's a HARD rule. Always secure the work: Clamp, vise, toggle bolt. Hand holding the work is a good way to find out how the bologna felt in the slicer. 

WHEN a drill bit snags in a hole do NOT lift up on the feed lever!!! This just chips the edges on the bit an dulls it. Hold the handle down and turn the drill OFF, then turn the chuck backwards and ease up on the handle. The bit will free right up and be none the worse for the experience.

Bits jam most often when you break through the far side. With practice you'll hear and feel as the point of the bit starts to penetrate the far side. Back WAY off the down pressure and let it ease through. It only takes a second but makes all the difference and you'll get nicer holes.

There are text books about using drills of all kinds. Get a drill bit sharpener, I know how to hand sharpen bits but sharpeners do a better job. 

Frosty The Lucky.

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Picked up a couple of die and holders last night at the auction house. They had been laying in dirt and crud for who knows how long. A little go juice and a wire wheel and they seem to be in good condition. One is a Champion Blower and Forge. 

 

 

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Beaumont Metal Works 2x72 grinder. Got it for free. Guy said it pops his breaker every time he turns it on. I'll see what I can do with it. Can anyone suggest some good belts incase I get this working?

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I had a couple of cutting edges from a road grader follow me home a while ago. (sorry I didn't take pics of them) does anyone know what alloy they might be? Or have any fun suggestions of what a guy should do with them? I'm thinking a guy could make a mean meat cleaver out of them. 

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AR steel; not a great blade steel.  There was a fad for making turning wrenches from them. I usually use them for the square holes as adjunct hardy holes.

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