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7 hours ago, JHCC said:

Spotted this interesting-looking hunk of steel next to the road a few weeks back and finally stopped to pick it up.

I just looked more closely at the photo of your mystery object, and I noticed that it appears to have a sleeve in it. The object is rusty and dirty enough that I can't tell if the sleeve is slid, pressed, or welded in place. Pressed-in sleeves are common in many equipment types, since the sleeves can be replaced when worn, and I've replaced a few over the years. If it were cleaned up a bit, there could be a few more clues. In any case, there are a lot of similar-looking constructions on heavy equipment...it's definitely not from a Volkswagen. Hinges/pivots, bucket linkage parts, machinery mounts, etc., are a few possibilities.

I have a backhoe with some similarly-shaped features that have a few different functions, so I think BigGunDoctor's mention of a backhoe is in the ballpark.

Arkie, as far as a heavy-duty clevis-type tow hitch goes, that idea crossed my mind too, until I noticed the sleeve, which sort of dampened my enthusiasm for that idea.

JHCC, did you ask Lola's opinion?

Al (Steamboat)

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It was more than half buried in the dirt when I grabbed it, so no surprise that it's filthy. I'll knock off some of the crud and try to get a better photo. There is some sort of sleeve connecting the two tabs.

2 minutes ago, Steamboat said:

JHCC, did you ask Lola's opinion?

Yes: her appraisal was that it's probably inedible and therefore uninteresting.

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JABOV

Just a box of vermiculite.  got a big bag that fills a 16 inch tool box.  

 

and some testing files.  I've heard various opinions on them but the seller took an offer so I gave them a try.  I used them on a few tools and knives that have a stated hardness.  I see that once you get the feel of them they could be quite useful.  

 

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Well, I'll have to modify my terminology a bit. The thickness of the "sleeve" suggests that it's not really a sleeve but an integral, cylindrically-shaped part of the object that was designed to bear a heavy load. It looks like something was designed to latch onto that part of the object it in order to move/lift/secure whatever this object was once welded onto, or perhaps the other way around (I'm assuming that this object was 'welded' on to something, since it sort of looks like a weld at its base). I'm guessing that the weld or substrate failed, and it broke off from whatever it was welded to. Someone is probably unhappy about that.

As to what it was once welded to, don't know...could be a lot of things. It also looks like there are some black marks on that cylindrical portion of the object from whatever latched onto it, and maybe the remnants of some grease. I can only speculate what it was once welded to. Snowplow? Truck dump bed? Road grading equipment? Large dumpster/skip? or who knows? Maybe it could temporarily be called a "coupler" until some better idea comes along.

That's about all I can think of at the moment...

Al (Steamboat)

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I think Al and I are on the same page with this one, it's so generic it's almost impossible to say WHAT it came off. With that size bearing surface in the sleeve bushing(?) it's intended to take a LOT of moving force. Maybe an attachment for an excavator arm or similar. 

I don't know what I'd do with it were I so blessed but I'm sure it's good for something. 

Frosty The Lucky. 

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2 hours ago, MotoMike said:

...and some testing files.  I've heard various opinions on them but the seller too an off so I gave them a try.  I used them on a few tools and knives that have a stated hardness.  I see that once you get the feel of them they could be quite useful.  

MotoMike, the testing files should be very useful. With gentle handling they should last you quite a long time and get you pretty close on the HRC number.

Al (Steamboat)

 

35 minutes ago, Frosty said:

I don't know what I'd do with it were I so blessed but I'm sure it's good for something. 

Frosty, I can relate to that. My wife says that she doesn't know what to do with me, but I must be good for something.

Al (Steamboat)

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19 minutes ago, JHCC said:

The ID of the “sleeve” is about 1-3/8”, and the OD is about 2-1/8”. 

So the "sleeve" or cylindrical part is roughly 3/8" thick. That's a little thinner than I thought it might be, but still fairly hefty. At 3/8" it could either be an integral part of the object or a replaceable sleeve. I think that the way to tell for sure would be to clean it to bare metal so that you can see if it's a separate piece of metal. The fact that you found it next to the road suggests to me that it broke off in use or during transport, since in most cases if someone intentionally burned it off with a torch, they probably would not have done so while on the road somewhere. Of course, it could also have fallen off of a load of scrap metal. The marks and grease that I think I saw in the photo suggest to me that something had been latched onto the exterior of the cylindrical area, whether that area is integral with the object or a removable sleeve. It would be interesting to see it after it's cleaned up.

That's a lot of mental speculation for a rather prosaic found object, but minor mysteries are fun to try to solve.

Al (Steamboat)

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Hi All,

Finally the acorn-ish table has followed me home from the cutter shop! It weighs over half ton, 4' long, 2,5' wide, 2 1/4" thick plate on 6 3/8" (160mm) H-beam legs. 

I have found out some ways to use it even more than originally planned: I will attach the post vise (2nd pict, on the left in the background) to one of the legs - the vise gets more stability, and I get more shop space. Also a machinist vise and a smaller shear will get mobile platforms. That way it will be possible to just drop one of them in the holes and use it. After use just lift it out and put it somewhere else.

Unfortunately the sensor of my welding helmet died on me so no welds today... Luckily I have other things to do, too ;)

Bests:

Gergely

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Gergely, that's a great table! Even though I don't have enough room for one like that in my shop, I'd find room somehow!

JHCC, I would not mind having a nice compact belt grinder like that. I like the small footprint. It looks like there's a custom jig on the table, which I assume is held on by a couple of easily removable screws. If it's a 45-degree jig, it could come in quite handy...an added bonus. Have you attached a cord and fired it up yet?

Al (Steamboat)

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That’s right: there is a jig in place. It looks like this was permanently set up to grind the corners off something. The jig is made of a 1/2” thick micarta-like material, so I might use that for knife handles. 

There’s just enough cord left to attach a 3-prong plug, so I’m going to dig one out and put it on. I’ll keep you posted. 

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HOLY MOLY Gergely, that is a gorgeous table! Now I'm suffering acorn type table envy! I'd even clean.

Good news John, sweet score on a working belt grinder.

I'm really feeling the need to find something good somewhere. <sigh>

Frosty The Lucky. 

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Gergely: May I suggest that you mount the vise to the table in such a way that it is easily removed when you want to use the entire table top as a flat surface. One way is to weld 4 pieces of angle iron to a flat piece of plate, each piece of angle iron going into a hole on the table. Then bolt the vise to the plate using studs welded to the plate for the holes in the vise attachment hardware. To use, put the vise and plate onto and into the holes on the table. It can then be lifted and removed when you want a full flat table surface.

Find a pipe diameter that will just fit into the holes. Cut it a bit longer than the thickness of the table and screw or weld a coupling to the pipe so it does not fall through the hole.These will be the dogs for the table. Make several. If you need taller dogs, then screw another section of pipe into the coupling.

Next project is to make a hold fast for the table. The table tools will become as handy as hardie tools.

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This showed up at my door yesterday. 

Poor mail lady... :rolleyes:

It needs a little refining in the divots. No big deal. The price is right. Excited to get it how I want it and test it out.

And a possum..... ;) they sure are cute critters...

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IMG_21092018_200658_(18_x_14_cm).jpg

Photos Not in order mentioned lol. 

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The mail lady would have the easy job of delivering it, I feel sorry for the person who packed the live possum for shipment. 

Very nice swage block, looks smaller than most I've seen here in the anvil/swage desert of the California gold country, and I'm sure it cost less, even with the shipping

Gerg, that is an awesome table, you should get plenty of years of workout of it

I went to our local re-store to try and find some chimney for the forge I'm building... No luck on that front but I did find a couple jackhammer bits and something to turn into a mandrel.(5gal bucket for reference)120649865_IMG_20180921_1742214792.thumb.jpg.6a1d1c8e9b8dbaf3680d211210bce256.jpg

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And there's Das thinking the cone is a log splitter. I agree, see if it has the same bolt pattern as a 6 lug pickup. I wish I had one, they're fast and safer than a hydraulic slitter by a long shot. Just don't get your foot under the end of the wood block. 

Frosty The Lucky. 

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