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Glenn

It followed me home

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It was Sale Saturday at the industrial surplus place, and while the 4150 press brake dies at $0.50/lb were gone by the time I arrived, I did get three pairs of elbow-length industrial gloves (for those formal hazmat occasions), a fire extinguisher for the kitchen, a toaster oven for tempering, and the steel lid from some kind of tank. The last is 15” in diameter, and I think it will work well as the base for some kind of stand. 

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This load didn’t follow me home, it was just delivered by my buddy who works in the equipment department of Home Depot.  He scouts for me and the stuff headed for the dumpster finds it’s way to his truck.  Bonanza!

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Those jack hammer bits are beefy!  

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Double pun!  Seriously though, I have no excuses for not having the tooling I need.

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The collars on the big bits are a great headstart for making hardy tools. 

Here are four tools from one bit:

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Handled round punch (in progress), 36 oz long rounding hammer, hot cut, 20 oz doghead hammer

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I figured you’d be going home with one if you are able to visit.  Parting gifts!  I fully plan on making a bunch of handled tools with some of this.  Thanks for the reminder.  It wasn’t on my radar when he handed that lot to me.

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I picked up a few worn jack hammer bits at my local Home Depot, even at $5.00 ea. they are a deal. Here's a thought for you. The bottom die either for the hardy hole or on my swage block I use the most is the Hex swage. They're perfect for profiling the edge of a Brazeal, punch, chisel, slitter, etc. for that purpose just driving one corner of one of those bits into a block would be perfect. No need for 3 sides when all you need is one corner to profile to Brian's design.

A screaming HOT block of steel and a striker to drive it in. Heck, it'd be a decent first swage to make from one of the bits. Hmmmmm?

Frosty The Lucky.

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I have just need the just of steel and the striker to do it.  Both are actually possible.  I’ve always planned to make a standerad 1” square swage block when I had the chance.  I’ll have to add that the The formula.  Just need to go and buy the chunk of steel to make the striking anvil.

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stevomiller I have just seen this, I have just looked up the yorkshire pattern and it does look like a perfect match and would make sense as we are in the heart of North Yorkshire.

I just find it interesting there is no pritchel or hardie hole, it rings like a bell so I might add some magnets under the square horn and see if it helps.

Cheers

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That’s not a hammer....THIS is a hammer!  I wouldn’t allow that beast near my anvil....

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Sixteen pounds. Twenty-six is a bit much, even for me. 

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Aww cute.

I had to shave down a heavy pick handle to fit, sledge hammer handles are too small.

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My hammer is bigger than yours! :) Very psychological turn of events around here... ;)

Bests:

Gergely

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naw just that a 16# isn't all that rare---or usable for most of today's smiths save as a small anvil...Now I talked with an old timer who had claimed to have use a 32# sledge all day long breaking rocks for a road in the CCC when he was in his late teens and there was a hardware store or two selling 20# sledges that I remember from around 35 years ago.

Every body knows it's not so much the size of your hammer as how you use it. And a really large hammer may be too big for your anvil.

(back to smithing...) When I teach, I often use a hammer less than 1/2 the size of my "smithing hammer"  just so I don't finish the beginner's project before they have gotten past step 1. It also shows them that a smaller hammer can still do good work---encouraging when they can't swing a larger one.

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Not sure why he made it, but Brent Bailey just recently posted a picture of the 50# cross peen he made.  Not sure if the link will work.  It isn’t sitting next to his 4.5# cross peen.

 

It worked!

 

Lou

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some odd stuff followed me home today

a tig welder

a blue point gas analyser

a firebasket

a few small tools

tried the welder and it works fine

paid 20 uk pounds ( about $25 us

Edited by the iron dwarf

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I have a better anvil than this one but  couldn't pass it up for free.  Its a Vulcan #12 and some will say thats all it's worth but maybe I can trade it for something.

 

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