Jump to content
I Forge Iron

Recommended Posts

I stopped by Home Depot yesterday partly because one of the guys in the club said they were selling off dull jack hammer bits. I asked a while back and the rental manager guy thought they were worth about 1/2 new price. Yeah right.

Seems a while ago someone else said to get rid of them and now they're asking $5.00 apiece. So I picked up a couple 3" spade bits.

Frosty The Lucky.

58d59b00690e9_5jackhammerbits.jpg.99f0b578a7c24c11a407e015df6e83e1.jpg

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • Replies 12k
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

Top Posters In This Topic

Popular Posts

Fleamarket report: 1 ballpeen, 1 crosspeen hammer US$1 apiece, 4 soldering coppers $5, small rockbreaker digging rod $3

Yesterday I helped a fellow smith pick up a band saw from an old junk filled garage, and this is what followed me home, some letter and number punches, and some old tractor drags or something, not sur

I have a smallish spalling hammer I "converted" into a straight pein and the balance isn't good. the Face side is too heavy making it darned tiring to use. I have given thought to cutting the face sid

Posted Images

Fellow i.f.I. Citizens

A great source for reasonably priced beeswax, is the local plumbing supply store. Beeswax rings are placed between the toilet and the base of the toilet ring. (i.e. floor). One botched toilet repair (the second try worked out), and I was left with enough beeswax for the rest of my life. I got creative and turned a kludge into a source of said beeswax for my smithy. (& wood shop). I probably have enough left over to put it in my will.

The botched toilet ring set me back about ten or twelve dollars.

Buying that amount of wax, at a hobby store, would have required a second mortgage on my house.

Cheers,

SLAGE.

So the moral of that story is that there may be a silver lining when you botch a toilet repair job.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I searched for beeswax toilet rings only to find that they are now made of a petroleum base, not beeswax.  I even wrote to one of the major manufacturers of the rings and they confirmed that theirs were petroleum based and that they knew of no current manufacturer who used beeswax any more.

Link to post
Share on other sites
28 minutes ago, Michael Cochran said:

Mine came from a beekeeper and not a toilet. :) I've replaced those wax rings on several toilets and never knew they were beeswax. Would you mind sharing your source for that information? 

 

5 minutes ago, arkie said:

I searched for beeswax toilet rings only to find that they are now made of a petroleum base, not beeswax.  I even wrote to one of the major manufacturers of the rings and they confirmed that theirs were petroleum based and that they knew of no current manufacturer who used beeswax any more.

According to the book "Renovating a Bathroom" by Taunton Press:

"The English, who invented what has become the modern toilet, used beeswax to seal the connection between toilet and pipe. But as the newfangled toilets gained popularity, they outstripped bees' ability to make wax. Modern wax rings are made of vegetable and petroleum waxes, with polyurethane additives."

Link to post
Share on other sites

I personally replaced the toilet ring, albeit more than a decade ago, and did so in Montreal,  Quebec, Canada.

Perhaps the situation is different in the U.S.A. or manufacturers have changed the wax they use a while ago.

There still may be some old stock bee's wax rings in a smaller plumbing supply shop.

For that matter Canada did not go to limited water use toilets like the U.S. did. (thank you Jimmah Cahtah). Incidentally the regulations were changed after the Federal government discovered that many people were flushing twice, end of water saving, and their attempt at social engineering).

Bees wax has a very distinctive smell. I know it very well having worked with it for years. Also, most Christian Orthodox Churches only burn bees wax tapers, and not paraffin tapers/candles like we smell in Roman Catholic Churches. The odor is unmistakable

SLAG.

Link to post
Share on other sites

In the world of muzzleloading beeswax is an important ingredient in patch lube. I get my pure bees wax from a local beekeeper.

In the it followed me home yesterday, I took our trash to the county compactor and returned home with a truck load of various metal pieces. Another fireplace grate (smaller this time 3/8 sg stock), a square tube frame of some sort to be converted into a stand for the propane forge in progress, 2 sections of black iron pipe 6 feet long and, 3 full boxes of 13 gauge carbon spring wire insulation supports.

Link to post
Share on other sites
12 hours ago, Irondragon Forge & Clay said:

In the world of muzzleloading beeswax is an important ingredient in patch lube. I get my pure bees wax from a local beekeeper.

Aye. It is also important in the leather working world. What type of smoke pole do you have?

Link to post
Share on other sites

Since Lisa will not let me take apart any of our vacuum cleaners (including the two we inherited from her mom or our main one that we just replaced), I was rather pleased to spot an old upright that one of my neighbors put in the trash just as I was headed home for lunch. I know most folks consider vacuum cleaners to be overkill for a forge blower, but (A) it's probably less so than the shop vac I'm currently using and (B) it's certainly less noisy. Plus, I can take the shop vac back to the woodshop in the basement to help keep that area more clean.

Link to post
Share on other sites

All my fans are in boxes to hush them up a bit. The big one has a 1hp motor and a 24" fan (at a guess) and is quieter than the cooling fan on the MIG welder...mind you that is an old  500 amp beast. 

I replaced the brushes on the little fan a couple of weeks ago and took some photos of the box with its internal baffle/flue...may be useful for someone...

Alan

58db052f2e6cd_AlanEvansBlowerhousing3212.jpg.a153f919ce723a6911a7ac2fc133d158.jpg58db04f63ac9c_AlanEvansBlowerhousing3213.jpg.0daa7c0b544fe88c953ce5227d5c1390.jpg58db04f9105ff_AlanEvansBlowerhousing3215.jpg.7133c4491ccf179945829a522b182006.jpg58db04fc8fb4a_AlanEvansBlowerhousing3216.jpg.eaf54317baeaa9cc909cc1ee16666be1.jpg

Link to post
Share on other sites

a few days ago a 2.5kw induction heater followed me home from the local scrapyard, it looks complete and ok apart from the E stop button and one ferrite core, made by inductelec at sheffield for heating metal.

should be ok for small stock so will give it a try I think

Link to post
Share on other sites

It's okay for a loaner I . . . guess. It's good to see people who'd rather see a good tool in use rather than the shed. How about  putting the Lakeside on a chain and hanging it on the loaner's horn for jewelry?

Sweet score you lucky dog you.

Frosty The Lucky.

Link to post
Share on other sites

In a moment of idleness I searched on vise in craigslist and found this under "old vise": 4" jaws, shows die forging marks on it, has an Indian Chief mounting bracket and has been ridden hard and put away wet a number of times. Felt so sorry for it I offered US$40 to the fellow just to take it home and introduce it to hot steel again.  Now to find someone who wants to give it some TLC.  It's gracile and so would make a good light duty travel vise.

ElPaso4vise1.jpg

Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


×
×
  • Create New...