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I Forge Iron

It followed me home


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A friend briefly mentioned doing something like that with it. I told him I didn't know if it would work or not. I do have a cheapy metal chop saw with a busted switch tho. Might be a lil safer to fix that one. This one will get cleaned up and hang out until I find a use for it or find someone else that needs one since I already have a nice newer miter saw. 

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  • 2 weeks later...
On ‎6‎/‎7‎/‎2016 at 5:04 PM, 7A749 said:

No, this didn't follow me home, but I sure wanted it to.

Hay Budden, prolly about 36" long. Never seen anything quite like it. Real thin face with long heel. A guy who owns a rather large rigging company has quite a collection of old stuff. He's having his guys build him a display room for some of his select pieces.

Im going back there soon, gonna ask the owner if I can get some better pics, just so I can wish I had it :D

image.jpeg

Hey, new to IFI here. I actually created my profile so I could respond to this post...seven months later... but anywho. Since so much time has passed you may have already gotten an answer but if you haven't, that a wheelwrites anvil right there! From what I have been told they are pretty rare. That is the kind of anvil I learned on (at a living museum) and we would have collectors come by and offer to buy it about once a week. I hope you were able to grab it! Greetings from Austin Texas!

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I had some tongs arrive at my home this morning so they didn't follow me home they found a home anyways.

A former School buddy 1st through 12 grade 1952-1964 saw these being thrown out at the HS in town and grabbed them stuffed them in his truck and told the people "I know someone who can use these".  Cost me a cup of coffee and we had a half hr. chat catching up.  I'll bet 2/3s of what I have in the shop came to me from other people seeing them or finding them or having them they didn't know what to do with.  Tell everyone you know your looking for blacksmith or anything for that matter tools.  Best to  have 25 sets of eyes looking for them than just yours. 

I have 2 pictures but one will not up load tonight.

DSCF1725_4542.JPG

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My thought as well Dave. 

The shock inside the strut has oil inside and all warnings on them state contents under pressure. I don't mess with shocks. The risk is not worth the reward. If the mechanic had a spring compressor it would have been best for him to disassemble them. be safe, potential harm/death/damage is not worth scrap, and I doubt it would cost more then $10. For a mechanic to disassemble them. 

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Ditto not messing with struts unless you KNOW what you're doing. If you were LUCKY the oil would bust out in a jet, if it burst the case you'd be looking at a close up of a BLEVE. Fuel air explosions are not nice neighbors.

Frosty The Lucky.

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I had four bronze bearing sleeves measuring 3" long, 2" od and 1.75" id. They had some numbers on them (283224) that has me running circles to identify the alloy. Looks like a lead free bronze alloy, SAE 851. I'll be doing some more looking before I use them for anything but if anyone has any suggestions as to where to look feel free to let me know.

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2 hours ago, Michael Cochran said:

I had four bronze bearing sleeves measuring 3" long, 2" od and 1.75" id. They had some numbers on them (283224) that has me running circles to identify the alloy. Looks like a lead free bronze alloy, SAE 851. I'll be doing some more looking before I use them for anything but if anyone has any suggestions as to where to look feel free to let me know.

Over here that number describes Oilite brand or sintered brass bearings. Compressed brass or bronze powder which has oil in the interstices.

It is quite difficult to get anything else...I have been trying to find some plain/solid phosphor bronze bearings but nobody seem to stock anything but the oil filled sintered bronze.

Alan

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5 hours ago, the iron dwarf said:

you can easily buy a piece of PB and make bearings

:) define easily.

The finished mass produced bearings cost very little over the small-quantity-premium on the raw material cost and delivery and maybe even less...and then you have to set to and machine it..to paraphrase Mrs Beeton...first buy your lathe!

I recently had to buy a solid bronze bush for the Telehandler axle drive shaft guide tube. It came from Italy via the importer via the local agricultural dealer and still only cost £50 odd pounds with their handling shipping and mark up. It would probably cost more (in time and money) than £50 to order the material, and machine it (complete with oil thrower groove)  even if I knew what the press-fit tolerance was...the old one and its housing was distorted...and I was able to carry on running the machine until the new part had arrived.

But all of the online bearing suppliers that I could find were only stocking Oilite bushes no solid Phoshor Bronze. But such is the temptation for saving money, I probably spent more than £50 worth of time looking!

I do have a lump of hollow bar left over from another project, but unfortunately it is too large for the bearing required.

Alan

 

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1 hour ago, Alan Evans said:

:)

..to paraphrase Mrs Beeton...first buy your lathe!

 

But all of the online bearing suppliers that I could find were only stocking Oilite bushes no solid Phoshor Bronze. But such is the temptation for saving money, I probably spent more than £50 worth of time looking!

 

Alan

 

I love the original Mrs'Beeton.s  book great laugh if you just read it ie'Gin to clean mirrors ect

Ánd Alan my friend part of the"" blacksmith Culture" is being a skinflint:D

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15 minutes ago, JHCC said:

Would that be the sinter of rotation?

Only sinister if it was rotating anti-clockwise, and only then if in the Northern hemisphere.

 

26 minutes ago, ianinsa said:

I love the original Mrs'Beeton.s  book great laugh if you just read it ie'Gin to clean mirrors ect

Ánd Alan my friend part of the"" blacksmith Culture" is being a skinflint:D

We must have had the paperback edition...we only ever used vinegar and newsprint for cleaning glass.

 

Alan

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Just now, Alan Evans said:

Only sinister if it was rotating anti-clockwise, and only then if in the Northern hemisphere.

"Sinter", not "sinister". And don't bring the northern hemisphere into it, unless you meant to be polarizing.

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16 hours ago, the iron dwarf said:

they will have oil inside so watch which way the jet of burning oil goes, you dont want to be in the path of that

Thanks for the replies.

 I know they have oil in them, where I burn brush at work is a large open area and I only burn when it is wet I will read the old thread. Maybe I will get out my spling compressor (have to find it) and take them off the proper way.

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