Glenn

It followed me home

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15 minutes ago, littleblacksmith said:

 

Have any pictures? or was that back when dinosaurs roamed the earth?:P

                                                                                                                                     Littleblacksmith

The AMNH has a photo in their visual catalog; see this link.

 

8 minutes ago, ThomasPowers said:

Perhaps jammed into a piece of antler or tusk or bone...

Plenty of wood in that part of the interior.

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Thanks! that's cool!

                                                                                                                      Littleblacksmith

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13 hours ago, JHCC said:

Yes, that's it. "Tavasr" (pronounced "TAH-vahsh") is the word in the Deg Xinag dialect of Northern Athabaskan as spoken by the Deg Hit'an people of Anvik, Holy Cross, and Shageluk. "Ulu" is the Inuit word for the same knife. 

When my mother was a little girl in Anvik, they didn't use the "Indian" words for anything; this was just called a "fish knife". 

 

(This came to me unhandled; I added the cork.)

That is a very elegant blade, one of the most interesting I have seen...I feel an homage fish knife coming on, to be completed in time for the 25. December.

I can figure some dimensions from the cork or have you cut that down at all?  Ø 21mm x 46mm (Ø 0.83" x 1.8") is a cork I have here.

How do you find it in use? Is there anything about it you would alter?

The two different radii at the blade ends are gorgeous!

Alan

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29 minutes ago, Alan Evans said:

That is a very elegant blade, one of the most interesting I have seen...I feel an homage fish knife coming on, to be completed in time for the 25. December.

I can figure some dimensions from the cork or have you cut that down at all?  Ø 21mm x 46mm (Ø 0.83" x 1.8") is a cork I have here.

How do you find it in use? Is there anything about it you would alter?

The two different radii at the blade ends are gorgeous!

Alan

The blade is 4-3/4" x 3-3/16" x 3/64". The cork is 1" dia. x 1-3/4" long. Here it is disassembled:

IMG_1934.JPG

39 minutes ago, JHCC said:

The AMNH has a photo in their visual catalog; see this link.

The 1903 acquisition date for the stone knife in the AMNH is interesting; this may be from the grave goods sent to the Museum by my great-grandfather in 1903 and repatriated in 1999 under the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA). See this article for an account of their return.

27 minutes ago, ThomasPowers said:

Why not a piece of oosik or mammoth ivory to jazz it up a bit?

Here's my great-grandfather's cribbage board, made from a mastodon tusk he dug from the bank of the Anvik River. 

IMG_1935.JPG

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18 hours ago, littleblacksmith said:

 

Have any pictures? or was that back when dinosaurs roamed the earth?:P

                                                                                                                                     Littleblacksmith

This is why I shouldn't read at my desk during lunch.  Took half of break to clean up the snorted/spit coffee. 

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Don't get Frosty started on cuneiform puns; he'll just babble on. 

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4 hours ago, JHCC said:

Don't get Frosty started on cuneiform puns; he'll just babble on. 

That's his stylus.

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On ‎11‎/‎27‎/‎2016 at 5:24 PM, littleblacksmith said:

 

IMG_5344[1].JPG

IMG_5345[1].JPG

oh yeah, the piece of high carbon steel I found and the spark test-

 

any idea what the lock plate may have come off?

 

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3 minutes ago, Dogsoldat said:

any idea what the lock plate may have come off?

 

A gun?

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On 11/28/2016 at 3:25 AM, JHCC said:

Yes, that's it. "Tavasr" (pronounced "TAH-vahsh") is the word in the Deg Xinag dialect of Northern Athabaskan as spoken by the Deg Hit'an people of Anvik, Holy Cross, and Shageluk. "Ulu" is the Inuit word for the same knife. 

When my mother was a little girl in Anvik, they didn't use the "Indian" words for anything; this was just called a "fish knife". 

 

(This came to me unhandled; I added the cork.)

I must not have spent enough time in Anvik, I've never heard one called that. Fish knife or hunting knife but not Tavasr. Heck, the only time we heard one called an Ulu was from little kids saying things we wouldn't understand. Saw them Called Ulu in gift shops and such but that's about it.

Makes me think though, I'll bet "Tafasr" is a close transliteration of fish knife in Russian.

Frosty The Lucky.

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Das you got some great stuff from the demo derby guy. I race a stock car here and sometimes those races are more like demo derby events. I have a lot of broken axles, cracked diff gears and such. Those pulleys look like alloy pulleys from a band saw. The flywheels make good heavy bases for sculptures and those chains are an easy way of forging rings.

Yep, you got a nice haul there. And the chook came with it?

Little blacksmith, you dug up some treasures too. That thing with the loop on the end is for holding gates to the post. The top of the gate swivelled in the loop and the thread adjusted the height of the gate. That lump of wrought is interesting - has the real tree bark look. You'll have to forge an axe for the sheath now.

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3 hours ago, Frosty said:

I must not have spent enough time in Anvik, I've never heard one called that. Fish knife or hunting knife but not Tavasr. Heck, the only time we heard one called an Ulu was from little kids saying things we wouldn't understand. Saw them Called Ulu in gift shops and such but that's about it.

When I was in Anvik in 1987 (for the 100th anniversary of the founding of Christ Church Mission), there was something of linguistic revival being attempted, with people trying to use the Athabaskan words for as many things as possible. I don't know how much it succeeded in the long run, but I just happened to be there at a time that everyone was saying "tavasr", so that's how I learned it. 

3 hours ago, Frosty said:

Makes me think though, I'll bet "Tafasr" is a close transliteration of fish knife in Russian.

That I couldn't say. "Knife" is nozh (нож), and "fish" is riba (рыба) in Russian, but there may be some obscure term for "fish knife" that's died out.

On the other hand, the Wikipedia article on "Ulu" tells me that such knives are called "tlaabaas" in Koyukon Athabaskan and "tthamas" in Holikachuk Athabascan.

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Ausfire there is a lot more to be picked through over there. He still has a few large piles and several smashed up cars. I'll be excited to get the old manure spreader and plow. 

The chooks I already had. :) 

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4 hours ago, Daswulf said:

Ausfire there is a lot more to be picked through over there. He still has a few large piles and several smashed up cars. I'll be excited to get the old manure spreader and plow. 

The chooks I already had. :) 

ok must be a local term what is a Chook?

 

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7 minutes ago, Leon Renaud said:

ok must be a local term what is a Chook?

 

:) it's what Australians call a hen/ chicken. 

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In Canada a chuque is a brimless hat. It is usually made of closely woven wool

It is a wonderfully warm and comfortable hat, that folds into a very little space which fits in a parka, (or ski jacket). pocket

There is an Italian twin handled chopping kitchen utensil called a Mezza Luna that has a similar blade shape as an Uluh. It is usually a little larger than an Uluh. It is an excellent food chopping aid which is particularly handy for chopping vegetables. (especially salad vegetables). The knife is used in conjunction with a wooden bowl which conforms to the blade's lunate shape.

The British celebrity chef, Nigella Lawson uses it in her numerous cooking show series.

Regards,

SLAG.

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And you can find a kitchen chopping tool composed of several lunate blades spaced a bit apart with a single handle; saw one at the fleamarket last weekend...

 

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One of my next projects is going to be a new pastry blender. The fancy SS one from the kitchen supply place keeps getting bent out of shape. 

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