Glenn

It followed me home

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right, I had to buy the whole drawer or none, I was mainly wanting the wrenches, file, and a few other things for some blacksmithing projects.

                                                                                       Littleblacksmith

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25 minutes ago, SmoothBore said:

On the other hand, Potato Forks are quite useful, ... but conjure up unpleasant memories of sweating in the garden.

Fortunately, it can be "re-purposed" into something less traumatic.  :P

I saw it as a good source for some smaller diameter spring steel.:D

 

                                                                                                    Littleblacksmith

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I use to use speed handles when I worked at the automotive lift company for doing in ground lift seals. One of the young guys was WOAH! what is that? 

The Simplex jack is a nice find. I have a pair of 15 ton cap. that I use for trailers, and my forklift. 

 

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about the railroad simplex jack. Do any of yall know how it got its name? I tried to do some research on it, and found that it was used for peir and beam homes and barns, but how does it relate to the railroad??

                                                                                                 

32 minutes ago, BIGGUNDOCTOR said:

I have a pair of 15 ton cap

I think mine is a 5 ton.

                                                                                                    Littleblacksmith

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Before the 20 to ton bottle jack, has do you think they lifted train cars that became derailed or needed wheel or axle service? Not to mention repair/replacement of wooden tressel posts? 

Spead handles, particularly long ones are handy for spark plugs, as well as auto transmition work. Pre air wrench and ratchet they whet certainly faster than a wrench. I have a 1/4", long 3/8 a standard 3/8 a long 1/2 and a standard 1/2", I can use the long as a lever to turn the short, to break loose things like lug nuts when dragging out the air hose and impact isn't practical. 

One can also use adapters to fit screw driver tips, this makes driving wood screws so much easer with out a Dewalt or 1/4" impact. Adapters can also me made to drive old school drills. So don't discount the speed handle, learn to use it and you will find that maybe fighting that air hose just isn't worth it (besides its hard to twist a bolt off by over tightening it with a speed handle)

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Well, tmy9966 check your thread in a little bit, I told you I would try to source something for you!

I confess, on a more tragic note, I have an addiction, a vise vice. Yes I am a Viseaholic. One is never enough. This one scored today in Goleta, California, USA.

Cheers, Robert Taylor

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53 minutes ago, Charles R. Stevens said:

Before the 20 to ton bottle jack,

mine is only a 5 ton jack, so what would it be for? I guess though it could be used for the tressel posts maybe.

 

                                                                                                         Littleblacksmith

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My wife and I decided to hit a few yard sales today and I found a couple goodies. I'm almost embarassed to say I didn't negotiate the prices any but I feel like it was good buys. I have to make sure the suspected tool steel really is since I need a few more puches. I payed a total of $7.50 for all I got today. I ended up with about 20 taps (several 1/4-20, three 1/2, three 3/8, and several smaller ones including some metric), two hand drills I believe are called star drills, a large chisel, and a nice pair of scissors. I'm thinking the scissors are hand forged but I'm unsure so I need to do some more examining. I do know they are made in China, it's says so on the side and it's also marked with Chinese lettering. The taps are from various makers and the chisel and drills are unmarked as far as I can tell at this point.

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Went out to get milk, first thing i know i lost one hour driving around for garage sale. Everything for around 35$ .

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Loaded rail cars, locomotive engines and unloaded rail cars all need different jacks, a empty car corner can be lifted by a 20 ton, but a 5 ton will lift it so much faster. The boys in the shop wouldn't want to spent more time than necessary (or atleast the shop boss) to lift an empty car to service the bearings.  

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So I finally figured out what the Chinese writing on the side of my 'new' scissors say. I hate that I wasted as much time as I did to simply find that it says 'Made in China.' Here I was thinking it might've been a clue as to age or a location of manufacture (more specifically than 'China') and was disappointed.

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I've seen some like them online in several places for prices ranging from $3US to $23US for one as well as a few set in the upper end of the same range. They need a little cleaning to remove the rust as well as a sharpening and after all that might need a tap on the rivet. As they are now they cut fine. I bought them so I'd have an example in hand when I tried to make a pair, something I've wanted to do for some time now.

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On 2016. 06. 04. at 1:30 AM, Takeru691 said:

Went out to get milk, first thing i know i lost one hour driving around for garage sale. Everything for around 35$ .

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Hey,

That knife looks pretty much like a Marttiini filleting knife from Finland. - I may be wrong though...

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I was off today and decided to haul off some junk and I found myself a new beauty layed over and smiling at me from the edge of the pile. Unfortunately there was an estate sale 'expert' who told the guy who was going to sell it to me what it was worth. They usually sell stuff for about 25 cents a pound but I didn't get that deal. I payed $50 but I think it was worth it since it works and looks to be complete. Now I just have to relocate the discussions about cleaning and restoration and put it to work.

 

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If the screw/screwbox is in good condition you still got a deal; That's a lovely vise; straight leg straight handle looks beefy---how wide are the jaws?

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No, this didn't follow me home, but I sure wanted it to.

Hay Budden, prolly about 36" long. Never seen anything quite like it. Real thin face with long heel. A guy who owns a rather large rigging company has quite a collection of old stuff. He's having his guys build him a display room for some of his select pieces.

Im going back there soon, gonna ask the owner if I can get some better pics, just so I can wish I had it :D

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1 hour ago, ThomasPowers said:

If the screw/screwbox is in good condition you still got a deal; That's a lovely vise; straight leg straight handle looks beefy---how wide are the jaws?

Jaws are 4.5 in wide and it's 40 in tall minus the little nib on the bottom of the foot. Weight is about 60 lbs. It has very smooth operation so I won't do much beyond clean up grease dirt and rust that's accumulated over the years. Only thing I see that's not right is a small piece broken off the screw box. But the threads in the box and on the screw are in great shape and are well greased. I am curious about the amount of play between the screw box and the leg. When you loosen it beyond the springs push limit the screw box gets loose in a hurry. That may be normal since I've never run one out that far before.

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That's a nice little haul. I'm always on the lookout for those type of wrenches. The pawn shop guys save them for me. Got two rather large tubs full of them, might make something  out of them at some point. The small ones make great business card holders.

Have fun with the new stuff :D

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Do you have a picture of a business card holder that you could share? I've been trying to come up with a design for one, but haven't found on that I like.

                                                Littleblacksmith 

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On 4/16/2016 at 9:52 AM, JHCC said:

Okay, change of plans. After an overnight soak in vinegar, it looks like that sledgehammer head is actually wrought iron. 

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Not sure what I'll do with this, but at least it's good material.

Just occurred to me that maybe I should simply put a handle on this and use it for punching, cutting, etc. I'm guessing it might have been a stonecutter's hammer in the first place, so why not keep using it for those times when you don't want to damage (or cause damage with) a hardened hammer face?

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Today was a good day, easy work and lots of good finds. I have a 'new' 1.5 hp motor that I have to test to make sure it works, another electric go cart frame, and a Marlin .22. They all came from a dumpster on a job site and I was given permission to dig in. I also scraped together about 50lbs of stoker coal from another job site. I also was given the chain from a garage door opener. I'll share pictures if anyone is interested.

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Joy.  Traded even for a fabricated portable forge and blower.  BIG railroad forge.

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Yaggy it is a champion forge table and legs with a buffalo blower good score both ways.  

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On ‎04‎/‎06‎/‎2016 at 1:20 PM, SmoothBore said:

Just my opinion, ... but I've found there are few things in the world, as useless as a "speeder" wrench. 

Everybody has a couple laying around, ... and they're NEVER worn out ..... :D

 

On the other hand, Potato Forks are quite useful, ... but conjure up unpleasant memories of sweating in the garden.

Fortunately, it can be "re-purposed" into something less traumatic.  :P

 

.

For the most part that's true; but they're great for heavy aircraft maintenance, as part of a group for pulling/installing major panels and floor boards. A couple of the crew starting removal/insertion with screwdrivers followed by others with the speeders. Saves time, wrists, and stripped screw-heads compared to air tools.

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