Glenn

It followed me home

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3 hours ago, notownkid said:

Was this stuff in a flood? 

I didn't see you post earlier, sorry. All I know about the stuff was it came from some estate and of the furniture from the same estate was from the 70s with some older pieces.

Thanks, coldiron. The wife wasn't as impressed but she wasn't upset so that's a good thing. :) 

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3 hours ago, notownkid said:

Was this stuff in a flood? 

I didn't see you post earlier, sorry. All I know about the stuff was it came from some estate and of the furniture from the same estate was from the 70s with some older pieces.

Thanks, coldiron. The wife wasn't as impressed but she wasn't upset so that's a good thing. :) 

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Michael, at a guess the little T hammer looks like an old combo of an iron workers alignment bar and a chipping hammer of sorts. 

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About twelve feet of 4" x 8" I-beam, salvaged from a demo job between home and work. Thank goodness they had power, so I could plug in my angle grinder to cut it to fit my van!

I'm thinking anvil stand....

IMG_20160203_124438193.jpg

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JHCC, Get a roof rack, next time there may not be power available and one long length is more useful than a few short ones anyway......:D

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12 minutes ago, Smoggy said:

JHCC, Get a roof rack, next time there may not be power available and one long length is more useful than a few short ones anyway......:D

True enough, but (A) I'm planning to cut it up anyway, and (B) I was working alone and not entirely confident in my ability to get the thing on top of the van without taking out a window!

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7 hours ago, smfg_mendo said:

Old Snap On KRA21C Hip Gable Rook tool box

IMAG1273_zps43jy8sxi.jpg

IMAG1274_zpst33ngrsw.jpg

IMAG1276_zpslsxkqnlb.jpg

This reply is broken for me, I cant see the pictures. Is this just me, or do other people have this bug? Is there anyway to fix it?

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4 hours ago, JHCC said:

True enough, but (A) I'm planning to cut it up anyway, and (B) I was working alone and not entirely confident in my ability to get the thing on top of the van without taking out a window!

Keep in mind things can go UNDER the vehicle as well as on top, especially if you don't have very far to go, as long as it's secured well. Clamps( especially bridge clamps) work well for adding tie down and attachment points for straps and so on.

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1 hour ago, DSW said:

Keep in mind things can go UNDER the vehicle as well as on top, especially if you don't have very far to go, as long as it's secured well. Clamps( especially bridge clamps) work well for adding tie down and attachment points for straps and so on.

My father in law has told me several times about tying rebar under the truck to take it to a job site where they were havin a footing done for a house. He's the only person I've ever heard of doin that before now lol.

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1 hour ago, DSW said:

Keep in mind things can go UNDER the vehicle as well as on top, especially if you don't have very far to go, as long as it's secured well. Clamps( especially bridge clamps) work well for adding tie down and attachment points for straps and so on.

Now you tell me!

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Several times doing concrete we had to take 20' pieces of rebar to the job with the pickup when the truck with the overhead rack was down say for inspection or repair work.  Light weight stock I've lashed to the passenger side of the pickup truck as well, using 12" bar clamps clamped to the top edge of the bed front and rear with the stock laying on those and the mirror up front. I've opened the hood and pulled the stock tight to the body with a strap if need be all the way up front.

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....."under loading" there's an interesting concept! I have known of some item being carried below a motor, (spare wheel, fuel cans, fire extinguishers etc) but always with a dedicated mounting, not sure of the legality here in the UK!

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Most times as long as something is securely attached to the vehicle, and doesn't look too stupid, most cops don't give it a 2nd thought. Some times I wonder how they let people out of places Like Depot etc with them simply holding sheet goods to the roof by hand etc. The cops do get cranky if things come loose however. All ways plan for the worst like some idiot cutting you off so you have to make a panic stop, and be sure to flag anything so they don't ram the thin hard to see piece of steel if it sticks out past the vehicle front or rear. Figuring out how to secure something is usually the real key no matter where you load stuff. Steel is slick and often oily and slippery and can be hard to secure in small bundles. 

 

Nasua 357 duct tape is one of my favorites. It's one of the strongest duct tapes on the market. If you ever see the Mythbusters shows on duct tape, that's what they use to suspend the car, build the bridge etc. It's almost impossible to cut without a knife.  We used to wrap small bundles of rebar with that stuff to make one"unit" that was easier to strap down. It also worked great for securing it to the side rails on the overhead rack. Depot used to carry Nasua 357 tape regularly, but I had a hard time finding it last time. I got a roll of their 557 tape that seems to be just about as good, though not quite as sticky.

Learn how to use "chokers" That's another good way to secure stuff. The harder you pull, the tighter the choker gets. Ratchet straps can be wrapped like chokers if need be. Hook the one end say near the middle of the load to the truck, wrap around the load and pass back under the strap to "choke" it, and secure forward and ratchet tight. The load won't shift, especially if it's all taped together 1st.

As mentioned clamps are really useful. You can use them to support a load, create an attachment point to stock, or use them as a place to tie off on a frame rail etc.

I personally hate bungee cords.if I can pull it over to secure it, chances are it can move enough to get loose. "pull" type friction straps aren't too bad for light weight items and I keep a selection on the truck to secure many things. Ratchet straps are my favorite though. I have a good size selection of both 1" and 2" straps on the truck at all times.

 

Hmmm. Makes me wonder, have we had a thread on ways to load/secure stock here before? Might be worth it's own thread if not... Probably a good subject for those that aren't regularly familiar with securing loads like many hobbyists.

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Fergy, just remember to lube the strap so the driveshaft can spin freely......

My Dad told ma about doing that years ago. He remembered back in the 30's how long ladders were hauled under the old trucks.

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5 hours ago, BIGGUNDOCTOR said:

Fergy, just remember to lube the strap so the driveshaft can spin freely......

My Dad told ma about doing that years ago. He remembered back in the 30's how long ladders were hauled under the old trucks.

Remember that a lot of the old cars and trucks had closed drive shafts nothing spinning out in the breeze like todays cars

 

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I recon if this chap knew about tying stuff to the underside he could have got much more on!

Fully-Loaded-Car-Funny-Overloading.jpg

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actually he's decreased the undercarry room by quite a lot there; I'm betting they don't have the 90 mph wind gusts we saw the other day where the road crosses the mountains in a gap.

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On 2/3/2016 at 3:54 PM, Smoggy said:

JHCC, Get a roof rack, next time there may not be power available and one long length is more useful than a few short ones anyway......:D

As it turns out (in a most fortuitous happenstance), the three legs of the anvil stand I'm making will fit precisely into the longer of the two sections of I-beam. Taking the top piece from the end of the shorter section will leave a 59" section for other uses. Lucky me!

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