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I Forge Iron
Glenn

It followed me home

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No photo, but a cool story: my mechanic lets me pick through his scrap bin, so I stopped by yesterday to see what he might have. One of the other mechanics saw me, said "There's the guy I wanted to see!", and handed me a box of bolts that he had saved for me (they had been used to bolt some heavy gear into its crate). Nice!

(I shall make him a bottle opener.)

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Stop at an estate sale yesterday and pick up a Millers Falls bench grinder for $12.00 has nice solid tool rest. Tried it out this morning and it runs smooth with very little vibration. Vintage tools are great. Need to add some safety shields from my old grinder. 

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Told my boss I had to get to a store before it closed and so crossed the border a bit earlier than usual and high tailed it to the steel distributor to buy stock for my class on Saturday.  They were running low on 1/4" CR sq stock so when they went to fill my order they came up short of full length pieces but had some odd ball lengths and 1' short one and a "damaged" (bent) piece.  I told them I would be perfectly happy to take it in pieces that were off sized and they ended up cleaning out the stock room for my order.  I paid for 72' and they tossed in the rest to make up for it being oddball/damaged so I got 91.5'...I guess giving the office staff an example of what I was doing with their steel paid off big time!

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Finally had some free time today and decided to hit the flea market. Spent all of $20 (my WHOLE budget) but got a few items.

A Nolvex file and 3 Nicholson rasps (they look rusty but I would bet that if they were ever used it was very little. They're still sharp), an adjustable that's stamped "Diamond Calk Horseshoe Company" (never heard of that one), a small pair of cutters that are Maun Industries England (good shape and no nicks in the cutters) a few clamps that I already figured out something to do with, and a good Easco hacksaw handle.  Also a couple of old Stanley squares, a punch and a pry bar (also Stanley)5650fb7b9b546_FleaMarket.thumb.jpg.d4833

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Not sure what these are, but it's a lot of decent flat bar in there, probably mild steel. Picked up by the side of the road.

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Panzer, those clamps are for holding a camper shell to the bed of a truck.

The curved tooth files are excellent to have.

Diamond is a well known tool company. Calks are used on some horseshoes for better traction.

JHCC, looks like you need your nails trimmed....

Those are some interesting items, can you post some more pics from different angles?

 

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JHCC, those look like brick carriers for masons. Line up a row of bricks, and the upward force on the handle gives you the leverage to keep them clamped while you carry. Up a ladder, scaffold, etc. Set them down on a flat surface, push down on the handle, and they stay put. Unlike trying to deal with a vertical stack of bricks.

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John McPherson, that's what I thought at first glance, but they're not quite the same. I'll try to get a better photo later.

BIGGUNDOCTOR, that's one of the pit bulls.

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16 hours ago, JHCC said:

Not sure what these are, but it's a lot of decent flat bar in there, probably mild steel. Picked up by the side of the road.

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Those are scaffold brackets to hang off a pair of ladders. You run an expanding plank between two ladders and can walk and paint between the two . When I was young, my Dad was a school teacher and during summers, he painted houses. We had several sets in the garage.

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Eujeankilt hit it right on. I still use those at times, painting, changing windows. I quickly hung one on a small ladder after I cleaned out my outdoor boiler to give you an idea how they work. They are handy if you do any carpentry or painting.

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Hmm...now to decide if I want to use the steel or sell them and use the money to buy something else.

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Make a couple of large trammel hooks for pots with them!  Throw in a large tripod and you would be ready to cook a cauldron of stew!  (google trammel hook and look at the pictures and you will see why that came to mind...)

I went to the fleamarket today and got 3 large USA forged steel C clamps---largest one is at least a foot inside the C (Proto)  for about $6 a piece I did have to go directly back to the truck as they were too heavy to carry on with...Then a fellow had a bunch of old hand forged real wrought iron wagon trace? stuff plus a lifting eye (good for dishing ladles into) and an old drilling hammer needing to be reforged and a piece that looks like it will be a good cresting stake---$7 total and he threw in a cloth bag as plastic wouldn't hold it! (It was good exercise carrying it the rest of the way through the fleamarket)

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I'm actually thinking pot rack for the cast iron frying pans.

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Just scored 400# of 1 1/2'' and 1 3/4'' cold rolled round bar in 20' lengths for 30 cents a pound.  Light rust on the outside , but forges nice under the big hammer. 

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a beatiful Caber drill press. it's a professional, hi quality, hi precision piece. this model was made in italy between 1955 and 1968. It is perfectly preserved with the sole exception of the drill table which was slaughtered. but the mechanics are perfect due to the exceptional build quality. all the components are original. I'm estatic.

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Ironmonger there is a 2 part epoxy called PC7 that i used to patch the table on my walker turner and it has held up quite well for over a year of oil and hard use

the stuff is sandable and drys to a dark grey

the one thing is make sure it gets warm enough for a good cure or it will stay slightly soft if

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On 11/22/2015, 10:01:42, JHCC said:

I'm actually thinking pot rack for the cast iron frying pans.

And here it is.

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So I finally went to the flea market for the first time. Here is what I got. All this stuff was $18. How'd i do for a beginner? Also, is that a hot cut or cold cut chisel? And any recommendations on what to make? Im planning on a few knives with those files, and maybe a punch with the square on, but any other ideas would be great.

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That's a "cold" chisel.

The hammer with the square face is for sheet metal work.

And one of the things that files are good for, ... is that they make excellent files.

It's my personal opinion, that "modern day" files, do NOT make good knives.

Maybe, "once-upon-a-time", ... back when files were essentially made from high-carbon tool steel, ... they did, ... but the addition of Vanadium, Cobalt and Chromium in today's files, makes them very difficult to heat treat.

If you want to make a tough knife blade, ... start with an old lawnmower blade.

Just my opinion .....

 

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I would keep the curved tooth file as is, they are excellent for soft metals. I am with Smoothbore, if the files cut , leave them alone. There are plenty of fully worn out files out there. New files are pricey, used up ones can be free. Take a file card to them, and clean them up a bit, then try them out. At work I have a couple of fairly dull files that I use for breaking the edges on some parts since they are not that aggressive, and do not remove a ton of material. 

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I agree with the above, a file is a tool you will get lots of life out of even if it's seen better days when you get it, you can't have too many files........clean them up fit handles.

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