Jump to content
I Forge Iron
Glenn

It followed me home

Recommended Posts

thanks, frosty.  i am going to try them on a tin can tonight.

 

and it keeps coming.  so, saturday I picked up that sander/grinder.  I was joking with my friend (and blacksmith mentor) Michael that I bet the next thing to come would be a grinder to replace the one I'd traded to him for a bottle of rye whiskey (a bit before I started setting up my forge). sure enough, sunday I was kibitzing while my neighbor across the street was trying to get his car started, talking with his dad. in their little shed where we were standing there was something that looked like an old belt-driven grinder half-buried on a shelf caught my eye. turns out to be just that, left behind when a friend of mine who is a bass luthier moved from their house to the house next door (he was renting it when they bought the house). and he told me it was mine if I wanted it. of course!!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It's funny how that works, once word gets around things just seem to start showing up. I hope you have enough room for the tools and other good stuff you're going to accumulate.

 

Frosty The Lucky.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

well, we live on a half acre :)

 

Not for long, I know guys who could cover that 15' deep in a few weeks. I built a 30'x40' shop and it was getting crowded before I got the roof on it.

 

Frosty The Lucky.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Madwing, the "snips" you show in your picture appear to something made from Bernard parallel jaw pliers.   They made a few different models but I am not sure if that is one of them and most likely a shop made adaptation.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

frosty, most things have to fit in the garage, or pass muster of MLW.  so i know it won't overtake.  i just know it.  really.  i do.

 

gazz, you might be right.  i've got to pull them out and play; i didn't have a look last night due to other time needs.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Madwing, I hope MLW is easy on you and yur accumulations of 'stuff'. I have five acres here and fortunately for me, my wife doesn't care how much scrap I bring home as long as it stays out of view of the house. Happy to oblige.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

cheers, ausfire.  this is a brand-new thing.  she's been pretty good with me bringing in tons of other stuff (for woodworking, valve stereo rebuilding, etc.), but neither of those have the bulk factor.  i'm going to be making her stuff, that has worked in the past, too :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Here you go Frosty, here's my railroad anvil all cleaned up. I left the radius on the one edge and just blended it into the face after cleaning it up. I might put a horn and a shelf on it when I have more time to work on it. Thanks for the encouragement.

post-57167-0-50630400-1413348428_thumb.j

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It looks ready to go to work to me Dave. A horn can be handy but a shelf isn't much use that can't be found where the flange and web come together. If you're thinking a chisel plate make a saddle, steps/shelves/etc. aren't a must have to be an anvil. From what I see most European anvils don't have steps and they're been at it long enough to have a handle on what's necessary. <wink>

 

Frosty The Lucky.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Dave, this RR rail enthusiast would like to hear how the top was machined if you would. Did you have an indication that the top was indeed work-hardened?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

and if you are really gung-ho on RR rail anvils "The Complete Modern Blacksmith" Weygers has a chapter on making them including all the bells and whistles (horn, heel, hardy...) including how to heat treat them!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Randy Bill, I machined the face with a indexable flycutter/face mill on the Bridgeport. To be honest I'm not sure that the track is very hard or work hardened at all. It machined pretty easy, and a file left a mark pretty easy as well. From my machining experience it reminded me of machining a soft (not heat treated) tool steel like D2. So it's tough but I wouldn't say it's work hardened. I think it will work until I can aquire a proper anvil.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks ThomasPowers, I'll add that one to the reading list. I'm reading The Blacksmiths Craft by McRaven currently I'm not really gung-ho about the track anvils, but since I'm just starting out I'll work with what I have for the moment.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

3duck, beyond mcraven is randy mcdaniel's "a blacksmith's primer", and thomas mentions, weyger.  both fun reads, and inspirational.  not as much as taking a class, though!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My first real wrought iron! lol... I know it isn't huge, but it's cool to me. Especially since it was pure chance. I stopped at the bay on the way home today to look for driftwood for a project, walking along I saw a lumpy straight 'stick' in the edge of the water. Picked it up and could then tell it was metal under the clumps of rust and stuff. I whacked it against a rock to knock off some of the junk off it and saw it... the beautiful wood-grain texture.

 

Now to save it till my skill is up to a worthy project.

post-28530-0-79357800-1414630628_thumb.j

post-28530-0-82107300-1414630698_thumb.j

post-28530-0-82721700-1414630765_thumb.j

post-28530-0-67649900-1414630831_thumb.j

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
post-45359-0-52197900-1414632107_thumb.jpost-45359-0-93111800-1414632174_thumb.jpost-45359-0-19638500-1414632223_thumb.j

I was given this Canedy Otto No. 16 Post Drill Press recently if I would use it in my new shop. It was removed from a woodworking shop of an old fellow I knew. It worked when it was taken apart to move it out. I also got a post vise from there as well. It was delivered on the pallet and according to an original ad it weighs 362 lbs without the electric motor.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Aah one of my weaknesses, big boy puzzles!  :)

 

Very early in my career ( as a Manufacturing Engineer ), the Company I was working for, bought a Cincinatti "Twin Grip" Centerless Grinder, at a Public Bankruptcy Auction, of a machine rebuilder.

 

All the "rebuilding" was complete, but the Grinder was still unassembled.

 

It arrived on 47 seperate pallets, ... and i was handed a box full of Prints, and told to put it together.    :rolleyes:

 

 

About a Month later  :rolleyes:, ... it was successfully running parts, ... and I've never been intimidated by a "Basket Case" project, from that day, to now.

 

 

I too enjoy the process of resolving that sort of "puzzle". 

 

 

 

.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've been assured all pieces are there, already noted the drive belt is missing, and have located pictures of what it suppose to look like operating. I grew up in my dad's auto shop where we were always receiving engines & transmissions in boxes all apart from those who could "fix anything".

Only problem is finding time and something to lift the dumb thing to work on.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

that drill is fantastic for drilling holes in pipe slow and steady but she will get you there

i have used one for a job off the grid and now its on my list of tools to add to the shop

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


×
×
  • Create New...