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Ibor

Nydam, Illerup Adal, Vimose....

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How has this not been commented on yet?!

I'm a little dumbfounded to be honest. They're all really nice, especially considering the exclusitivity of being hammered only. 

I REALLY like the 6th one from the left, the longest one. Looks like it would fit perfectly on a 2 meter long pole as a Pike. 

Sockets have been the bane of my blacksmithing journey so far, so I commend your ability to make them. 

Great work. 

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Agreed, the sockets appear to be excellent...uniform and smooth.  I would love to see the tooling you use to hammer in the third edges.  Congrats on the beautiful collection you've made.

 

Lou

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Thank You guys!
This longest, Celtic is 67 cm.
Last weekend I was at the ancient "Dymarki Świętokrzyskie".
The event concerned the object of iron and steel industry in the early centuries of our era.
It is mainly about reconstruction of the process.
Spin the charcoal spears in the simplest furnace they could use in those times blacksmiths.
Here are some photos ..

1.jpg

2.jpg

3.jpg

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Thomas, you seem to prefer thralls over apprentices.  Are the the same thing?

 

Ibor, that event looks like a great time.  I'm even more impressed you made them "traditionally".

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You have to feed them both, but you own the thrall. I'm not sure their was anything like a formal apprentice system untile the formation of guilds, atleast not for Norse and Saxons. I would think it's more of a family buisness kind of thing. 

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For help I had a man who just does not have this picture .....
Was it thrall or 
apprentices .. here I do not know .... hahahaha ....

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Thrall was kind of a weird blend of slave, serf, and servant.  They were owned, but had a lot of rights. On the other hand, it was no big deal to abuse or even kill one as long as you paid the blood price, which I forget the name for.  They could be freed, but once freed, still didn't have the same rights as a freeman, or carl. A lot of them started as freemen that gambled their way into servitude. A lot of Vikings would bet anything they owned, including spouses and even themselves if they lost everything else.

Love the long sockets too. I don't know that he used tooling to get the "third edge."  There used to be a video of Thijs de Mannaker making a spear where he got a similar effect using the edge of the anvil to draw stock sideways and leave the middle ridge.

 

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When I was studying Athenian legal orations, one of the interesting details that came up was that under Athenian law, it was crucial to determine who bore the blood-guilt in any unnatural death. One set of orations (probably a rhetorical school exercise rather than from an actual case) concerned the death of a boy in a gymnasium who had been struck and killed by a thrown javelin, and the various orations made the case for the possible guilt of A: the boy who threw the javelin (for not paying attention downrange), B: the boy who was struck by the javelin (for running across the javelin range during training), C: the javelin instructor (for instructing the boy who was struck to go fetch a stray javelin, thus putting him in harm's way), D: the head of the gymnasium (for not paying proper attention to how the place was operating; what we would call these days "creating an unsafe environment"), or even E: the javelin itself (for not flying true). My professor pointed out that even in a case of accidental death caused by a piece of masonry falling from a building, the offending rock would be ritually condemned, taken to the border, and "exiled" with a hefty throw.

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