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How big an anvil?  What type of smithing do you do? I have 2 I made from a mine timber---I'd have to measure their exact dimensions---that have worked well for me with 165# anvils.  I added the handles as they are part of the travel kit.  Been using them for about 15 years so far.

anvil_stumps.jpg.d1bde56ab70b71d5c30d63cdba89a176.jpg

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My anvil sits on a 12"x12" block just like that. It isn't secured to the ground with anything, but sometimes when working on the horn it does rotate around (block and all) a bit. But I'm not chasing it around anywhere. How heavy is your anvil? If it's lighter than 150#s you may have more trouble with it moving around on you. 

864469833_IMG_2019-12-09_17-53-55(2).thumb.jpeg.6bb516889a96c66a5bec201b17a30a16.jpeg

 

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The anvil is 100lbs. I haven’t done any smithing yet, I am in the process of setting up. I plan on starting with the basics, practising proper technique before moving on to blades or various art projects when I improve. Everybody makes knives so eventually I would like to make more unique pieces. 

 

It does have 3/4 inch holes at the feet. Should I bolt it to the block or use that flat bar or chain to secure? 

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Use what you have to mount it down. It doesn’t need to be anything special, just so long as it pulls the anvil down tight. The tighter it is the lower the ring, which your ears and your neighbors will appreciate. Of course a good bed of cheap silicone caulk makes a dig difference in the ring also...

I just used rr spikes in predrilled holes for mine. (It’s what I had and got me to work fast. It’s not going to be fun if I ever want to remove it from the stump though!)

David

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16 minutes ago, Goods said:

 Of course a good bed of cheap silicone caulk makes a dig difference in the ring also...

David, and anyone else, any thoughts on placing hockey pucks between the anvil and the base, as well as at the bottom of the base? Would this increase the sound or absorb sound? Would it absorb energy or return energy? 

 

Further, here is a pic of the anvil on the block, unsecured until I figure out the best way. 

B20B1604-98A5-4C4B-B490-92A73A30B72C.jpeg

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4 lag bolts, one for each hole at the foot, would work.  Predrill the holes for the bolts to make things a little easier.

Cut two half circles from 2x something lumber, put them into the curves between the feet and screw it into the stand.

It does not take a whole lot to keep the anvil from falling off the stump.  As mentioned, depending on that you are doing, the anvil and stand may want to twist.  

As the stand is starting to split, so placing a metal band around the stand will support and hold the wood together.

 

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The bed of caulk will do a more to kill the sound than hockey pucks I imagine. It will be in contact with the whole bottom rather than just in a few spots. You could always test that first though by checking the ring with nothing between the anvil and stand, then checking it again with the pucks in place. If it helps then go for it (I would add the caulk too though). 

Are there holes through all four feet of the anvil? If so a lag bolt through each foot and maybe a couple straps around the waist for good measure should be plenty to get that thing mounted.

P.S. As a fellow hockey fan who's your team?

Note that this may affect the quality of the advise I give from this point forward... ;)

Edit: Glenn beat me to the punch.

Edited by Frazer
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On 9/14/2020 at 2:19 PM, Frazer said:

P.S. As a fellow hockey fan who's your team?

Note that this may affect the quality of the advise I give from this point forward... 

If that’s how it’s gonna be then my favourite team is whoever is playing against yours! B)

 

Oilers are the team. But as a Canadian I just enjoy the game, period. I’ll watch any hockey. 

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Painted my anvil stand to protect the metal, I also charred the wood while I was at it, then rubbed it down with BLO. I wasn't too careful with the paint so I slathered it over the anvil base and also on the end grain..

JYZ1bJI.png

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This is the beginning of my stump. My neighbor, my BIL, and I split the sides off. It's green ash (species; it's halfway between green and dry otherwise). Looking to knock just the corners off and leave the sides reasonably flat for tool holders. Couple of other acquisitions for scale. 

Followed Me Home - Resized.jpg

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  • 2 weeks later...

I've been liking this thread, lots of good ideas. 

Looking for feedback on a stand that needs to quiet down a Soderfors anvil for residential forging. I am thinking masonry sand piled into a handy scrap hydraulic reservoir I have on hand. Would a threaded system be recommended to tighten everything down, or would piling sand a couple inches above the base of the anvil be enough? Still trying to decide how a threaded system would look with sand if I go that route. Might run some lengths of threaded rod to the base, or something a little more fancy.

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A sand stand works well for quieting an anvil. You're over thinking it. A wooden box with an ID a couple few inches larger than your anvil's foot and a little higher than a good comfortable working height stand. Then make cut a board a little wider than our anvil's foot but will fit EASILY in the box and staple it to your anvil. 

Fill the box with sand until your anvil rests at your comfortable working height, about wrist height wile standing relaxed in your work: shoes/boots/sandals/etc. (sandals is a joke, good footwear is basic PPE) Once it's at the right height, it'll be stable the sand won't let it bounce and the connected wood foot will prevent it from sinking in use.

Now cover the anvil's foot with sand.

It should be as quiet as a Soderfors will ever be. Below is the stand mine is on and it quieted my Soderfors from dangerously loud to a nice blacksmitherly clink. It's a steel stand and the difference in resonant frequencies between it and the anvil damp the vibration / sound.

DARN, I don't have a decent pic of my Soderfors in her stand, this is my 206lb. Trenton. The same stand made to fit the anvil foot, the hammer rack wedges between the stand and anvil's foot securing it. The chain is connected to my engine hoist, I load anvil and stand in the pickup bed as seen in the pic. It's secure, the tripod is stable on rough surfaces and it's much more quiet. 

Of course this is just how I did it, other effective means work nicely.

Frosty The Lucky.

 

Anvil stand hammer rack0s.jpg

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Thanks for the tips Frosty! The engine hoist looks like a back saver as well. My 202 lb Soderfors is no where near portable as a 100 lb anvil. I'll post a picture up here when I am done. The scrap metal box on hand happens to be about perfect size, just need to cut it to height and fill with sand, might take about 1/4 yard or 500 lb of sand, so not likely I will be moving it around the shop at all.

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You're welcome, it's my pleasure. Oh yeah, that engine hoist is one of my best ever yard sale scores! It not only makes moving heavy stuff easy it MAKES ME clean enough room to do it. That's a win win if I ever saw one. :)

If it's a good steel box you can hook it up to the pickup and drag it where you need it. Oh okay, use a come along so it doesn't scatter stuff in its way. 

I'm looking forward to pics when you get it done. 

Frosty The Lucky.

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