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Show me your anvil stands


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Oh, that sounds wonderful..   At one of the farrier customers they make soap.. and as an added bonus they supply me with the wonderful soap..  They will make me pine soap, Mint, eucalyptus its amazing just how nice it makes the skin feel and the smell is so refreshing.. 


here are the methods I have used in the past.. There are other variations but the heavier ways always work the best for me.  The last picture was maybe my most brilliant. 

 

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I agree. It conceptually , I thought was a master stroke of genius.  

Lol.  It later dawned on me, the last example would offer all the same strength in a much simpler, faster way of doing it.

Photo 9  is in no way as classical or inducing that "say what " vs number3 but..  ;)

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Yes, but Number 9 satisfies all necessary application criteria in its elegance.....

There is a Stand Pipe (water tower) still standing in San Diego, I will dig up those images. when you see them, you will understand my what I finnd so appealing about Number 3...!

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Eucalyptus comes in many different flavors, our yard in S. Cal was surrounded by Blue Gum and it smell was similar but not quite the same as a eucalyptus cough drop. When the RR road was really opening California up Eucalyptus was brought in from Australia to make ties. There were problems they couldn't get around, first it's really stringy and tough, clogs rip saws so making lumber was a major problem. Then it tends to warp like crazy as lumber.

Then there were the long term problems the stuff didn't have natural enemies and it's darned fast spreading. For a while they were using it for wind breaks but . . .

Don't place any bets on that, it's the story I recall from my time in S. Cal.

Know where Lake Nacimiento is Robert? I used to have a lot there but sold it right after discovering I wasn't leaving Alaska soon enough to go fishing there again.

Frosty The Lucky.

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Pretty spooky Jerry. Lake Nacimiento and vicinity is on my Cinnabar Tourist List for the Klau and Buena Vista mercury mines upstream. They are said to be Superfund sites. It is further said that the fish in that are no longer safe to eat!

Had just started searching in SLO when I got laid off.

I do not know a red gum from a polka dot zebra, but have read that Eucs like to eject rail spikes, as well.

 

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All the gold country in Cal has high mercury content. Dad worked for an outfit making gold extraction equipment and we used to take the demonstrators around and test folk's concentrates. We also panned everywhere we went stream fishing. At the time $9/ton was break even. Folk with gold fever only seemed to look at gold content, sometimes silver. It was rare for us to extract less than $15/ton in mercury sometimes it was crazy high. Gold miners wanted to see gold and not much else counted. 

We'd put a little mercury in the pan with a squirt of detergent nitric acid water mix. If there weren't any nuggets in the pan we'd put the mercury in a vial. At the end of the day we'd extract the gold from the mercury, precipitate the mercury back out of the nitric acid and weigh both. 

We weighed everything in and out. Always came home with more mercury than we took and we were almost always panning and fishing at the same time. Fish till they stopped hitting, do some panning and move up the creek.

Potable water at the lake was brought in, I don't think there were any wells in use. We water skiied more than fished. Dad and I were into stream or deep sea fishing. 

Frosty The Lucky.

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I have a 1943 # 10 Vulcan 110 pounds that I use a lot and really like it and it's been in use since the early 80s in our shop even though we have 3 other anvils it's still my favorite. The other side is marked 43 for the year, a year younger than I.:)

I thought it had a thick plate until someone  pointed out, although the plate looks thick it really isn't, just the way Vulcan welded the plates on. You can see here after I did an etch to remove the rust/patina where a miss strike chipped it the actual hardened plate is rather thin. You can see the line below the chip that I was told it was a thick plate but the hardened plate is the smooth area above the cast iron break. Still a good anvil in my opinion because it is so quiet.

BTW Welcome to IFI...

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As you can see my Vulcan has been happy all those years on it's oak stump.

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  • 2 weeks later...

Here's my new stand. I complained the glue wasn't really heat-resistant (the hot scales tend to give the previous one a epoxy-resin smell); they told me to mix some fine white sand in the glue; and when curing; spray it with ashes. And so I did. The block of wood is 20 year old dry larix (hard woord). The block is glued to the floor; and the anvil is glued to the block. the straps are for security (the other one doesn't have straps) and preventing splitting. This anvil is a solid one piece really tool steel, and it used to be a real ear-buster; with the absolute immobility towards the ground; it has become very dead; even in the horns. You do feel it in your feet when you are whaling away at it with a sledgehammer; probably the concrete below transferring the shock. I added a pic of the glue itself (check the actual use-case of that stuff :D ). and I added a picture of my upsetting block; which is mostly in use because of it's nice square corners.

The beer is optional :D

 

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My idea is a steel frame, 1/4 inch thick material, welded together with a base. Capped with a removable 1/4 inch plate/box, the anvil "footprint" cut-out in the plate should captivate the anvil. The anvil will contact the wood, with hold-downs threaded into the cap plate. The hold-downs should pull the anvil into the wood and steel frame. 

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Well, it's taken far too long, but I can finally show my anvil stand.  The anvil is recessed into the top of the stand 3/4".  Stays there without tie downs...........for now at least.  This is my 50# Vulcan.  Hope to have a larger anvil some day and will tie that one down.

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