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Ethan here,

  I have bought and all days and onions 1CTW Power Hammer And I am quite happy about it.  It came off of an English war vessel, and the man who I am buying it from has rigged up a single phase system so that makes my life a lot easier ;) but too the question:  i've seen a lot of these power hammers put up on steel bases, and obviously that  would be a good idea to increase the height. But I am wondering if, to save work, if I can simply do a raised concrete foundation that would come above the floor line maybe 6 inches.  This is obviously a heavy cast-iron one piece hammer, so does it really need a heavy fabricated steel base underneath ? Anyway looking forward to the help.

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Oh man, what a nice hammer. It almost reminds me of a friends hammer, Matt, I can't remember though what he did for the base, I can check with him if you'd like. Matt did have it on concrete, and his first idea was to have it on a maybe like 7 foot deep concrete slab, but then he hit a broken water line so....

                                                                                                                            Littleblacksmith

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When I visited matt, he had his Striker bolted to a steel stand that was attached to the pad inside the shop area. I'm wondering if I can get around the steel base by simply having a raised concrete base.

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we had a sahindler, big concrete pad about 4 foot deep to floor level then new wooden railway sleepers ( ties ) on top to raise it 6" as recommended in the manual IIRC

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1 hour ago, Ethan the blacksmith said:

When I visited matt, he had his Striker bolted to a steel stand that was attached to the pad inside the shop area. I'm wondering if I can get around the steel base by simply having a raised concrete base.

oh yup, you are right. I now remember him making it, Thank you for the correction. I haven't visited him since he got it up and running, I really need to though, It seems like a fun tool.

                                                                                                                                  Littleblacksmith

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10 hours ago, littleblacksmith said:

oh yup, you are right. I now remember him making it, Thank you for the correction. I haven't visited him since he got it up and running, I really need to though, It seems like a fun tool.

                                                                                                                                  Littleblacksmith

No problem bud! It's a great hammer and I'm glad you got to see it!

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Nice hammer.

I have the foundation recomendations and blueprints etc that came with my Alldays 100 weight. 

I can email pictures of them to you if you want.(I only just got the 100 but run a 200 alldays and a 100 Pilkington (Old alldays). I am going to raise the 100 weight on new bought oak sleepers. A layer of sleepers and 50mm board on top brings the hammer to a good working height for me..

 For a one piece hammer like this ther is not the need for a seperate concrete block. I put a cast block in for my 200 but that has a seperate base.

 I have seen people waste an awfull lot of money putting weird steel bases under hammers. There would be no problem with a high strength concrete., or making a thin steel boz and filling it wioth concrete..... I am going with wood for mine, I may cut  the floor around the hammer to isolate it from the rest of the pad.

 I would love to see how you have the belt drive done as the gear on gear noise of these hammers makes thewm noisy.

I would add a spring or two to the back of the treddle as I find the weight only return on an alldays a little slow.

 Email me at [email protected] if you want me to photograph the info I have on the 100.

 

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Thank you very much. I will be sending you an email. I would probably mount the base for it on a pad or something like you said, but the trouble in my situation Is that my new shop space is dirt. So i would have to pour a pad anyway. 

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Hi Ethan

While Im far from an expert when it comes to power hammers and foundations I did an install for my 2 CWT massey and while it may be abit over the top being a two piece foundation I made my inertia block the recomended size and while it works just fine its only just enough so i would er on the side of more rather than less mass. My install is back in Jan or Feb Cheers Beaver

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If you have to pour a floor anyway, go ahead and build it up to a comfortable working height under your hammer. Isolating it from the shop floor is an excellent idea. It's not a huge hammer and being a one piece pretty forgiving to floors. Bob Bergman's Nazel 3B was bolted to the 4" slab in his shop and it wasn't breaking up under it. 

The difference can be the soils under your floor, it must be solid, hard and well drained. If the ground gets muddy then your hammer will liquify the ground and no telling how deep or cockeyed it'll end up. Have you dug any holes in your shop? What kind of soil is it? Don't worry though, I used to work for the Foundations section of the DOT geology part of HQ Materials. I spent 20 years looking at and testing soils to build BIG things on. I can give you a few tips. ;)

If you want good conservative overkill. make your forms say at least 1' wider and a couple longer than the hammer foot. Give yourself plenty of room to rest your foot on operating it. Make a template to hold the anchor bolts for the hammer in position. Double up the rebar, don't go crazy but don't skimp and make sure a couple pieces cross close to your anchor bolts. Look up a foundation or piling mix for the concrete. You'll be golden.

When it gets down to forming it up and pouring give a shout I'll run through what I know about it.

Frosty The Lucky.

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Here are the oficial Alldays foundation spec:-

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it is a deep foundation and is probably optimal. I have a "proper" foundation for my 200 alldays and I dont regret it (30 man days in the instilation!). I run 3 100wt hammers mounted on sleepers (so non optimal) and I am verry happy with them for me they do not need more.

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That is a beautiful monster machine, I love it.

Now, hopefully people are still reading these threads because I need some help, if anyone has the time and patience.....I am needing to build myself a small one of these (power hammer), I have developed arthritis but I do not want to give up what I love. I want to build a small hammer. I have built myself a fine steel belt sander which I use most days, so I am competent when it comes to building and welding etc.

I have a 2 hp motor for the project (which should be sufficient for a small power hammer) and plenty of steel, I am just struggling to figure out which design would be best for me to build. Any advice would be greatly appreciated.

 

Best regards,

Peter

 

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4 hours ago, AaIma Dauber said:

That is a beautiful monster machine, I love it.

Now, hopefully people are still reading these threads because I need some help, if anyone has the time and patience.....I am needing to build myself a small one of these (power hammer), I have developed arthritis but I do not want to give up what I love. I want to build a small hammer. I have built myself a fine steel belt sander which I use most days, so I am competent when it comes to building and welding etc.

I have a 2 hp motor for the project (which should be sufficient for a small power hammer) and plenty of steel, I am just struggling to figure out which design would be best for me to build. Any advice would be greatly appreciated.

 

Best regards,

Peter

 

Knowing what you wanted to forge would really help. The power I would need may be different from the one you need or the one the next my need. 

The Ray Clontz/Clay Spencer ture hammer is a good size and it has good control.

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Small like the 2 pound ram ones that mount on your anvil or small like the 50# ram ones?  What are your fabbing skills?

Mechanical or air?

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