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That would depend on the refractory, the thickness of the refractory (yes, you did say 1 inch thick), the temperature, the relative humidity of the local atmosphere, and many other factors.

Do you need a certain percent of moisture that your looking for? What is your definition of dry?

Lots of details needed filled in to properly answer your question.

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If you've already got it in your forge you may as well try it and see how it holds up.  It may turn out ok, but if it starts to crack badly or deteriorate quickly you'll want to use something more suitable next time.  It's usually best to do a several step process before trying to bring it up to forge heat to avoid major cracking and/or spalling.  I'd recommend air dry for several days, then put a light bulb or something else relatively warm inside for a day or so, then a couple minutes of low flame.  If you get a lot of steam, cracking or spalling stop and let it cool. Gradually use more heat for longer times until you can safely get to forging temperatures.  Once you get all the moisture driven out of the lining it's as good as it will get.  No matter what you use it will deteriorate over time, but some materials hold up a lot better than others. I had a less than satisfactory experience with a different brand of refractory mortar, but I still used it for several months rather than go through the hassle of tearing it all out. Now I use Kastolite 30 for that purpose.

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Nope. Look up Wayne Coe (I think that's his name) on google. He sells Kastolite-30 that's what you should use. But don't layer it over the other cement, wait till the other stuff come's off. Also you should cover the Kastolite with an IR reflective like Plistix (also sold by Wayne Coe). Now keep in mind that I haven't built a gas forge (hopefully I will soon), But this is what Frosty and Mikey seem to recommend I'm sure they will reply also, hope this help's :D 

 

Dylan Sawicki

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If you've already installed the stuff let it dry thoroughly, at your humidity I'd hang a light bulb in it over night. After it's dry, fire it for 10 mins and watch for steam. Let it cool give it a few hours to drive out hygroscopic moisture and fire it again for half an hour or so, let it get red and let it cool, over night maybe.

Should be good to go next day. For what that material can take that is. The label on the bucket says 2200f. and that's pretty far below good forging temps. However it might hold up, if so use it till it dies and do a better job next time. I'm thinking there are plenty of good learning projects you can practice on that will sell for enough to buy better refractory for the next build.

I have a number of early gas forges collecting dust in the shop, we all have. Think of it as the education fund or as the old timers call it dues. This happens to all of us one way or another and it'll happen again.

Frosty The Lucky.

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If you can, I'd return it. If it turns out to work well you can always buy more. I recommend you contact Wayne Coe he sells reasonable quantities of the good stuff for a reasonable price.

Frosty The Lucky.

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