Arthur210

Workshop Plans

49 posts in this topic

Another consideration is the sparks going up the chimney. Charcoal makes a lot of them (as Thomas mentioned) and you REALLY don't want those going onto a neighbor's porch, still hot. They likely wouldn't be hot enough to cause a fire, but it only has to happen *one* time for -you know what- to hit the fan really quickly. Some type of spark arrestor in the chimney may be a good idea, but I'm not exactly sure what you could use. I also burn charcoal, but my neighbors are bovine in nature so I've never had to consider it. They don't mind. 

Worth thinking about. 

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Code in most places with codes require spark arrestors on chimneys. Still yes definitely.

Frosty The Lucky.

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Indeed. Never crossed my mind not to install one. But a reminder to do it never hurts anyone!

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You can get the smoke out through any side wall without a stack if you do it my way.

iforgeiron.com/topic/41796-flashing-around-the-chimney/

It works quite well and gives you a lot of freedom in the design.

 

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Workshop update: The old shed is now empty and the tree has been cut down. While waiting for the crew for the tree, I started removing the old shed's siding.

 

20170602_182049[1].jpg

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Workshop update: The old shed is gone. You can see the materials I recovered from the old shed on each side of the picture. I plan on reusing most of it.

I've started digging to prepare for the concrete slab. The stakes delimitate the area where the workshop will be and the planks (which are level) show the yard's slope. The red pry bar to the left (in front of the piled-up wood) is where the left-most corner will be.

 

20170625_164309[1].jpg

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Monsieur Arthur,

This thread has a lot of good information.

Permit me to add a few extra points.

Quebec city (as also Montreal) has a long winter. So you, most probably, will be doing some smithing in colder weather.

The water bucket water will freeze during much of the year. 

A hose with the water turned up but with nozzle control should work for the warmer months.

Smithing in cold weather brings several other factors to mind. Synthetic ski jackets (or parkas), are potential fire "traps". We do not want to emulate Joan of Arc.

(not enough originality!).

Wool or leather is a much better choice for winter smithing apparel. (I bought leather jackets for very little at the Salvation Army store in Montreal for very little cost).

If you think you may be doing welding in your smithy. Use good ventilation and preferably a good cross draft. (which may need a window on the opposite side to the air intake.) Why?

Because of manganese fume poisoning. This subject was covered recently on i.f.i. and also on Jock's smithing site.

I'm sure there are more ideas but I'll get back to you if one of them pops into my mind.

Regards, and go for it.

SLAG.

p.s. You can get a ball bearing(s) from an auto repair shop, or a scrapyard for anvil rebound tests.

p.p.s. Be careful when starting smithing in cold weather. The anvil will be cold as well as the tools. Cold steel is brittle. Also condensation may be a problem, I suggest that you check out some i.f.i. threads on condensation and preventing rust.

p.p.p.s. You can buy a ball bearing(s) from an on-line seller. (McMaster Carr is one such retailer. Or perhaps a Canadian Tire store or their garage, up your way.

A one inch diameter bearing is a good size, but three quarter inch will work.

Try Thomas Power's T.T.A.T.P method for acquiring anvils and other blacksmith tools. (see i.f.i. for that).

 

 

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Salut SLAG, j'apprécie tes commentaires.

Indeed the winters are long and cold around here. But the shed will be fully insulated and I plan on installing a small heating unit to keep it above freezing temperature in the winter. I won't have running water in the shop, but will probably bring a bucket of water from the house whenever I fire up the forge. In any case I don't intend on wearing any synthetics when forging! But that's certainly good advice to anyone who reads this.

A small stick welder is indeed on my wish list and you raise a good point about the fumes. I am hoping that with the chimney and the windows being on opposites sides of the shop, ventilation won't be too much of a problem. It certainly won't be until everything is closed up and insulated, since there will be a roof ventilator. Once the insulated ceiling is installed I am hoping that the chimney can provide enough draw to get any fumes out quickly. I have a little bit of experience with stick welding from growing up on a farm, but I appreciate the warning in any case!

P.S. I'll keep scouting out the various local scrap yards over the summer, hopefully one of them will have ball bearings. In the meantime I have an 8 oz ball pein hammer that I can use if I find an anvil to test. :)

P.P.S. Work on the shed is progressing slowly at the moment. Digging through the roots of the removed tree is a lot of work. Nothing unexpected, but will hard work.

Cheers!

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A-210,

A lot of progress, looks good.

Hope this summer get the job done for you !

 

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19 hours ago, SLAG said:

p.p.s. Be careful when starting smithing in cold weather. The anvil will be cold as well as the tools. Cold steel is brittle. Also condensation may be a problem, I suggest that you check out some i.f.i. threads on condensation and preventing rust.

p.p.p.s. You can buy a ball bearing(s) from an on-line seller. (McMaster Carr is one such retailer. Or perhaps a Canadian Tire store or their garage, up your way.

Just saw those additional comments. I'll look up the subject of condensation and rust prevention.

Good idea about ordering some ball bearings online. Just ordered some. Ebay is my friend. :D

10 hours ago, Scrambler82 said:

A-210,

A lot of progress, looks good.

Hope this summer get the job done for you !

Thank, Scrambler!

A-210 made me smile. The numbers were added because the forum wouldn't let me register Arthur just by itself. That's been my name in the SCA (medieval re-enactment) for over 20 years.

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Another SCA'r!  Welcome!  (I joined the fall of 1978 even predating my start of smithing by a couple of years; still got my original membership number 4 digits starting with "2")

Are you reproducing any medieval physical culture?  I have a number of sources I can share.

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Hi Thomas! I joined the SCA in 1993 and my persona is 13th-14th century French, so this would of course be of interest to me, but I've never been strict and limited myself to a specific period and location in my explorations of the medieval culture.

I've noticed several posts where you mentioned Viking age blacksmithing, so I'm gueesing that many of your sources are from that culture. :)

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Yes and renaissance cooking as I've been duplicating a lot of Scappi's stuff for another laurel. Got a number of books on historical cooking if you are into that.  How about "Savouring the Past, the French Kitchen and Table from 1300 to 1789" Barbara Ketcham Wheaton  (of course like most the early part is much less covered than the later part...)  

"Le Ménagier de Paris", 1393, is a fascinating book on an elderly husband trying to teach a young wife all she needs to know of running a house so she will provide a good appearance after he's dead....

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I am indeed interested in historical cooking. I have a number of books, though not those you mention (even though "Le Ménagier" is well-known around here). One of the most interesting that I have is "Food and Drink in Medieval Poland" by Maria Dembinska. I found it quite interesting and tried a few of the dishes contained in it. :)

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I'm more on the making the tools for cooking side of things; a couple of others are

The Opera of Bartolomeo Scappi  (1570, great woodcuts/engravings?)

Iron and Brass Implements of the English House, J. Seymour Lindsay

Irons in the Fire, A history of Cooking Equipment; Rachel Feild, (again trending later---and beware there are at least 3 different books with this title on different subjects!)

So not all my sources are Viking.... Last year I found a copy of "To the King's Taste" on the 10 cent rack at my favorite used bookstore; now we have 3 copies...

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On June 26, 2017 at 11:52 AM, Arthur210 said:

Workshop update: The old shed is gone. You can see the materials I recovered from the old shed on each side of the picture. I plan on reusing most of it.

I've started digging to prepare for the concrete slab. The stakes delimitate the area where the workshop will be and the planks (which are level) show the yard's slope. The red pry bar to the left (in front of the piled-up wood) is where the left-most corner will be.

 

20170625_164309[1].jpg

How's things going on the Work Shop ?

 

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On ‎2017‎-‎07‎-‎07 at 10:48 PM, Scrambler82 said:

How's things going on the Work Shop ?

Sadly, not much progress as there has been a lot of rain in the last 2 weeks. I also had other things to take care of.

Weather forecasts are good for the next 2 weeks, so things should pick up again.

On the positive side, I was able to spend the better part of 2 days working with a blacksmith last weekend. My wife took a few pictures so I will post something about that when she transfers them to me.

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I don't know much of anything about smithing or fire safety, but I'd put the extinguisher on the opposite side of the shed from the door, would hate not being able to get out of there if there was a fire by the door and couldn't get to the extinguisher... which is by the door.

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 Your primary objective is to get out.  Which means more than one way out. And extinguishers should always be en route to the exit so that you're already on the way out of the building.  The window for an extinguisher to be effective can be pretty small, and all your steps in a fire situation should be towards evacuation. 

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Extinguisher by the door! If the fire is by the door you set up your shop wrong. Keep the door and exit routes clear and free of excess flammables, you do NOT want to be trying to get to the extinguisher while the fire by the door gets rolling. Typically you have a very narrow window of opportunity to extinguish a fire in a structure before it's beyond the extinguisher's capacity. You do NOT want to be standing there with an empty extinguisher with the fire between you and the door. 

You want everybody in the shop to run for the door if a fire starts. If you have the opportunity you want to be between the fire and the door, NOT the other way around. If you're not sure leave, call 911. PERIOD.Except rarely people don't burn to death, they die of smoke inhalation and taking a breath of 1,600f+ anything.

I don't have extinguishers in my shop. If a fire starts it's cardboard, wood, etc. push it to a clear spot and go take a break, it'll burn out. If the quench oil catches I toss the lids on both barrels and to take a break though I'll keep a close eye on the shop door for the smoke of an out of control oil fire, that gets 911. If one of the propane tanks starts burning it's run for the hills, calling 911 as I go and let it go till the pros with the right equipment and training get there.

Frosty The Lucky. 

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Thanks Frosty. What I meant, but far better articulated. 

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Workshop update: Some progress this weekend, despite some rain. I finished digging and leveling the area, built the form for the concrete slab and started putting the gravel that goes under the concrete.

Note that there is a slope in the backyard, which is why one end of the form is sunk into the ground while the other isn't.

20170716_185053[1].jpg

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