GoodThing Factory

was this vise repaired or made this way

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Wondering if anyone can tell me whether the way the mounting plate on this vise is original or the product of repair who knows how long ago? i've looked at a ton of images and can't seem to find another example of the mounting plate being secured to the shank via a wedge and hole in the shank and spring. 

Also, curious if anyone knows manufacturer and approx date. 

Thanks

 

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Looks to be original. I have one like that and have been told it is an earlier design.

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Tennon and wedge was an earlier (in the USA) style.  OP one looks loose so perhaps a retrofit or frankenvise.  80% of the vises I've seen are unmarked, style and proportion can be an indicator of manufacturer but...

Frank Turley knows an awful lot about these.  Go thru and read all of his old posts on vises if you want to learn more.

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Mine is clearly stamped H.LOSE but the body on yours is shaped differently. I'd follow Judsons advise until maybe someone else that knows more posts. 

 

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3 hours ago, Judson Yaggy said:

Tennon and wedge was an earlier (in the USA) style.  OP one looks loose so perhaps a retrofit or frankenvise.  80% of the vises I've seen are unmarked, style and proportion can be an indicator of manufacturer but...

Frank Turley knows an awful lot about these.  Go thru and read all of his old posts on vises if you want to learn more.

 

2 hours ago, Daswulf said:

Mine is clearly stamped H.LOSE but the body on yours is shaped differently. I'd follow Judsons advise until maybe someone else that knows more posts. 

 

thanks guys ... just curious if anyone happened to know the make.

mine is ready for a rebuild ... the tenon snapped on me and when i took apart i found some pretty half baked welds where it's been repaired at least once. i'm thinking the way to go is forge a new mounting bracket assembly and collar from some wrought iron i've got 

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3 hours ago, Daswulf said:

Mine is clearly stamped H.LOSE 

At least it's not "U. LOSE".

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When I repaired mine it had been brazed. I thought it might have been broken but removing the braze it must have just been loose since it wasn't broken. I have heard that this style is a bit less strong then the modern brackets but it all depends on how you use it. Good luck with the repair. Be sure to snap some pictures of the repair. 

Mine is awaiting my new work bench to be put into action. 

1 minute ago, JHCC said:

At least it's not "U. LOSE".

Lol. To be honest, in grinding out the braze I got a sliver deep in my eye( while wearing safety glasses) it was close. 

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Remember, there's nothing that says you have to remount it this way. If you're forging a new bracket, just make one that wraps around the post, as usual.

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2 hours ago, JHCC said:

Remember, there's nothing that says you have to remount it this way. If you're forging a new bracket, just make one that wraps around the post, as usual.

yup, that's my plan. the tenon and wedge doesn't seem as sturdy. thanks

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Check the screw and screwbox; the tenon mount vises often have the screwbox made with the thread brazed inside the screwbox.  (one of mine shows the screwbox being a forge welded tube with various ornamental rings forge brazed to the outside and the thread brazed to the inside.  Of course this is a more fragile set up and repairs or replacements of the screw/screwbox relatively common.

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2 hours ago, ThomasPowers said:

Check the screw and screwbox; the tenon mount vises often have the screwbox made with the thread brazed inside the screwbox.  (one of mine shows the screwbox being a forge welded tube with various ornamental rings forge brazed to the outside and the thread brazed to the inside.  Of course this is a more fragile set up and repairs or replacements of the screw/screwbox relatively common.

interesting ... it def looks like the screw box was replaced or repaired and brazed onto the interior threads. the box itself is in pretty rough shape  - could be age or maybe not the best job to begin with but it's solid and functioning fine. from the way it fits into the shank it seems like there should be a flange on the box to prevent it from slipping in the hole when the screw rotates - maybe there was a shim / wedge which is long gone. 

you're spot on about the repairs ... having taken it completely apart you can see it's been fixed quite a bit. but with exception of the tenon on the mounting plate which wasn't welded very well all the parts seem to be consistent with the tool's age - no modern bolts or washers  & aside from the spring it's all spark testing like wrought iron. 

never ceases to amaze me how i'll get a 5 yrs out of a modern, "decent" quality power tool but something made prob 100 yrs ago will last another 100 with a little maintenance. 

btw, any downside to replacing the tenon mount with a collar and bracket?

and ... the spring is also a bit rough, can it be replace with a piece of truck spring forged into a flat bar?

thx

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It would probably be stronger with that style bracket but you might not want to beast on that vise with the way that screw and box are. 

Whats wrong with the spring? Couldn't it just be re bent to how you need it? I have heard that mild steel will work just fine to make a spring. I just happened to have some smaller trailer leaf spring handy when I made a few and they work great.  

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7 hours ago, ThomasPowers said:

Check the screw and screwbox; the tenon mount vises often have the screwbox made with the thread brazed inside the screwbox.  (one of mine shows the screwbox being a forge welded tube with various ornamental rings forge brazed to the outside and the thread brazed to the inside.  Of course this is a more fragile set up and repairs or replacements of the screw/screwbox relatively common.

you may want to check it again for the tube being forge welded..   Most the early vises up till they started making solid boxes or cast iron boxes were all forge brazed and then turned in a lathe.. Or parts were made in a lathe and then brazed depending on the MFG.. 

Even the part that looks like a forge weld is more than likely just a lap scarf for the brazing joint..  Edges thinned and lapped..

Guys and Gal's, Don't discard the brazed screwbox as being inferior.. A good portion of them have standard screw counts based on standard square wire sizes and this makes a brazed box one that is fairly easy to fix if you can forge braze. not only that. a brazed box will have reinforcement at the base of the thread something lacking in cut boxes.  

When the old wound coils are worn.. you heat the screw box up till the brazing just starts to let go and then yank out all the old threads.(you can drill them as well but you still have to clean out the box completely.. . 

To rethread the box you take a new sq threaded screw, wrap wire on it tightly.. screw this into the cleaned box and then unscrew the threads (you bend a notch on the end of the wire outside the screw box).. Now heat up and do a new braze and boom. you have a brand spankin new screw box ready for another 150years of use.. 

The only problem is most screw vises have square cut threads..  They are designed to be able to handle a higher load than ACME threads while under pressure and still slip. More surface area and since the threads have flat face against flat face it's about perfect for a vise.. 

Most Machinists today don't know how to cut square threads and will avoid them like the plague as it's not cost efficient and takes some re thinking as well as multiple passes with each with wider and wider profiles unless you have a really stout lathe.. 

It's actually a pretty neat process and its funny now to think it was common place 100years ago vs today where acme is the standard and sq threads for anything is forgotten.. 

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Sorry JLP but when I said forge welded I meant forge welded. I doubt they would hammer the scarf deforming it like a forge weld for a braze and leave no trace of spelter when the piece is well coated with it other places near joints.

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1 hour ago, ThomasPowers said:

Sorry JLP but when I said forge welded I meant forge welded. I doubt they would hammer the scarf deforming it like a forge weld for a braze and leave no trace of spelter when the piece is well coated with it other places near joints.

Just checking since it can be easy to miss if not aware of the difference.. I wasn't only posting for you as you are a bundle of knowledge but also for newer people who might not understand there can be a difference.. 

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