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20170226_171240.thumb.jpg.183758fadccb25ceb849da4871dbc8e0.jpg20170226_171210.thumb.jpg.c99309d336640d5b2d49f9e8d6366793.jpg20170226_190554.thumb.jpg.ef73eeee3b9c81284dd0f61aaa637e5e.jpg20170226_171335.thumb.jpg.06081b0ce0efc21cfea350418d508845.jpg you are correct and I was lucky enough to find this one. They always stamp the initial of the last name of the maker of the anvil maker before the weight.mine is 100 lb. Mine dates to 1902. I can't exactly quote (remember, I will call him mr. Z) you on his name but supposably he worked there from 1900 to 1940 and he could put a pocket watch on an air hammer and touch it without breaking the crystal....... yeah that's what I'm talking about. I love it and I love the soul all about it it'll be with me until I die

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Black frog thank you for helping that's hard information to find out. You have no idea how long it took me to research mine.

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Hi all,

I recently picked up a Trenton anvil. Markings read w125 and A23555 or possibly A23556.

If someone could be kind enough to let me know what year it was made?

Thanks in advance!

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Edited by Steve G
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There is a "U" stamped next to the underside of the pritchel hole and a "C" next to the underside of the Hardy. Are those the initials of people who put those parts of the Anvil together?

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New to this but have a Trenton #161 and what I believe to be the serial number 192893.  Wondering it’s age as well.  It has apparently been abused by a grinder.

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   Hey Smoke, 

  According to AIA you have a 1926 vintage. Every time I read, or post information from Anvils in America, feel like I should put a quarter in a jar for Mr. Postman. Thank you Mr Postman. 

  N.N.F.              Beautiful, Manchester, Michigan. USA  

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Build, it's less expensive, and it is an excuse to spend quality time together learning somthing. Might I recomend the pinned posts at the top of the solid fuel section as a stepping off point for quick, cheap and effective forges? In the gas forge section the forges 101 and burners 101 have both evolved in to 600 or 700 classes on forge and burner desighn and fabrication. 

Might I also suggest keeping that 4" angle grinder and any of its kin away from that anvil? Under no cercunstance are we going to grind, mill or weld on it either, especially it's face. More good anvils have become door stops that way

 

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